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RIAA Wants Student Deposed On School Day 369

Posted by kdawson
from the drop-everything-and-get-in-here dept.
NewYorkCountryLawyer writes "In a Houston, Texas, case, UMG v. Hightower, the RIAA has served a subpoena on the defendant's son, a high school student, on one day's notice, telling him to be at a lawyer's office at 9:00 a.m. the next day, a school day, for a deposition. The defendant's lawyer objected (PDF)."
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RIAA Wants Student Deposed On School Day

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  • Prays? (Score:5, Funny)

    by jakosc (649857) * on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:06AM (#18798295) Homepage
    From the Motion to Quash:

    Defendant prays that the court grants this motion
    Prays?? Is that what's necessary now?
    • Re:Prays? (Score:5, Funny)

      by FlatLine84 (1084689) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:09AM (#18798363) Homepage
      I dunno, but this excuse beats the "My dog ate my homework" line.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by aadvancedGIR (959466)
      I don't quite remember (sorry, I don't live in the USA). Isn't Texas one of the state where you can't work as a government official if you're a bloody atheist?
      • Re:Prays? (Score:5, Interesting)

        by Frymaster (171343) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:29AM (#18798691) Homepage Journal
        I don't quite remember (sorry, I don't live in the USA). Isn't Texas one of the state where you can't work as a government official if you're a bloody atheist?

        i don't know about the 'bloody' part, but article 1 section 4 of the bill of 'rights' of the texas constitution states that people may not hold office if they don't "acknowledge the existence of a Supreme Being".

        the full text is:

        "No religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office, or public trust, in this State; nor shall any one be excluded from holding office on account of his religious sentiments, provided he acknowledge the existence of a Supreme Being."

        my source is here [state.tx.us].
        • Re:Prays? (Score:5, Informative)

          by Elemenope (905108) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:44AM (#18798987)

          And while I'm not sure if that segment of the Texas con. has specifically been challeneged, but other states that have similar provisions have had them struck down unanimously by the USSC [Torcaso v. Watkins (1961)]. The Article VI language preventing religious tests or oaths for federal office was ruled to apply to the states.

          • Re:Prays? (Score:5, Interesting)

            by hax0r_this (1073148) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:50AM (#18799087)
            Yes, I did some research on the topic last year and it seems that Texas doesn't enforce that clause in order not to dirty their image. If they were to enforce it they would be challenged, and if they took it all the way to the Supreme Court they would lose there, so rather than going through all that they just keep the clause for the warm fuzzy feeling it gives them, but don't bother to enforce it.
            • Re:Prays? (Score:4, Funny)

              by BrokenHalo (565198) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @02:17PM (#18801669)
              I knew a Texan once. He was so big that when he died, no-one could make a big enough coffin to bury him in.

              So they gave him an enema, and buried him in a shoe-box...

              *ducks* :-D

          • Re:Prays? (Score:5, Interesting)

            by ameoba (173803) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @12:48PM (#18800127)
            While it's great fun to argue the constitutionality of such of law, what are the chances that an atheist actually could get elected to any position of importance in TX?
            • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

              by aztektum (170569)
              Seems to me every puppe^H^H^H^Hpolitician I see on TV these days is always thanking God and going to church. The question is what's the chance of an atheist being elected to ANY national position of influence?
        • Re:Prays? (Score:5, Funny)

          by bazorg (911295) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @12:03PM (#18799341)
          he acknowledge the existence of a Supreme Being."

          Michael Jordan is real enough for me to sign that contract.

        • Re:Prays? (Score:4, Insightful)

          by Bogtha (906264) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @12:15PM (#18799551)

          article 1 section 4 of the bill of 'rights' of the texas constitution states that people may not hold office if they don't "acknowledge the existence of a Supreme Being".

          No it doesn't. Read it again. It says that people who acknowledge the existence of a supreme being are not subject to any other religious requirements. It doesn't say anything about people who do not acknowledge the existence of a supreme being.

          It's a statement restricting what the government can demand of public officials who believe in a deity. It's practically the opposite of a requirement to hold office — it's a loophole, not a demand.

          It's a stupid law alright, but it doesn't forbid atheists from holding office per se, it just doesn't give them the same loophole as everybody else.

      • Re:Prays? (Score:5, Informative)

        by wesmills (18791) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:57AM (#18799221) Homepage
        I do live in Texas, and the use of the word "pray" in a legal document, at least in the American legal system, does not imply communications with a religious deity. "Pray," as a verb, has at least two meanings that are distinctive here:

        4. to make earnest petition to (a person).
        5. to make petition or entreaty for; crave

        (See: dictionary.com [reference.com])

        The legal "pray" simply is a formal way to ask the Court for an action. You will find this phrase [google.com] in many [google.com] legal filings, not just in Texas courts.

        Thanks for the slam, though; always good to see the myths and legends preserved.

    • Re:Prays? (Score:5, Funny)

      by gEvil (beta) (945888) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:28AM (#18798677)
      What, pray tell, is your problem with the word?
  • by rsmith-mac (639075) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:11AM (#18798387)
    Uhh, I hate to even sound like I'm agreeing with the MAFIAA on anything, but when exactly are they supposed to depose him if not on a school day? The school week and the work week are pretty well aligned, and forcing them to either work on a weekend or wait until he's on vacation is stretching things. Their actions are certainly deplorable, especially giving a one-day notice, but doing it on a school day isn't one of those deplorable actions.
    • by tomstdenis (446163) <tomstdenis@gm a i l .com> on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:14AM (#18798455) Homepage
      How about do it after class? Unless it's a serious deposition (bah music lawsuit != worth ditching school) it can wait till after. Or better yet, bring the lawyer to the school, do it during a lunch break.

      Why does the music industry feel it should tamper with the education of our minors just to placate some facile legal action?
      • by Mateo_LeFou (859634) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @12:24PM (#18799679) Homepage
        "Why does the music industry feel it should tamper with the education of our minors just to placate some facile legal action?"

        Dude, get a clue: these are *pirates, they don't care about education. All they care about is stealing, stealing, stealing other people's intellectual property.

        If anything is tampering with their education, it's the alien viruses in their brains, which impel them to download our songs for *nothing, thereby descrating our intellectual property. The same intellectual property provided for in the Constitution, section IV, which says

        "Intellectual property rocks. We should have lots of it."
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by rob1980 (941751)
      I suppose scheduling the deposition for after 3pm is probably out of the question.
    • by pla (258480) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:16AM (#18798497) Journal
      and forcing them to either work on a weekend or wait until he's on vacation is stretching things.

      THEY want his deposition. Not the other way around.

      Why should he suffer an inconvenience to suit their schedule?

      In the same situation, if I had to lose a day's pay to humor the RIAA, I'd feel mightily pissed off. OTOH, I have very little doubt that some hungry young lawyer would work OT on the RIAA's dollar to take the deposition on Saturday or some weeknight.
      • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:32AM (#18798743)

        Why should he suffer an inconvenience to suit their schedule?


        Because this is one of the RIAA file sharing lawsuits. Making people suffer is their primary objective. The greater inconvenience in the initial stages, the less likely someone will actually challenge them. This is the RIAA saying "We can make life miserable for you and your entire family, and it's completely legal. So cough up whatever amount of money _we_ think is fair, and we won't keep you dangling in legal hell for the next decade."
      • by hazem (472289) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:55AM (#18799187) Journal
        Or lose good money paid as tuition. Let's suppose he's paying $2000 for each class and it meets 16 times (a semester), he's losing $125 for each class session they make him miss.

        If they're going to force him out of class for their benefit, they need to pay him for his losses.
    • Lawyers work weekends as a matter of course. Asking them to put off the deposition till a mutually useful time is no injustice - giving 24hrs notice is.

      -GiH
    • by mass (65691) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:25AM (#18798641) Homepage Journal
      The day in question was one in which the student was required to show up to take the TAKS [wikipedia.org] test, a state-wide standardized test that's required for graduation.
    • by jedidiah (1196)
      The RIAA can infact hold the deposition anytime they like. They simply need to have all of the principals present as well as the necessary support staff. This isn't something like a trial where you need to book the relevant government building and government official.

      They could hold this deposition at midnight and call it a seance.

      They could simply hold it in the business hours after school.

      They could be accomodating and even ask the guy when would be a good time.

    • by div_2n (525075)
      Do you really think lawyers don't work on the weekends? You don't know many lawyers I take it.
      • Normally the lawyers involved schedule a deposition. You can cancel with sufficient notice, all sorts of games get played. While lawyers work weekends, depositions really need to be during the week. You need: 1) Both attorneys, 2) the one being deposed, 3) anyone from either side that wants to be present, 4) any counsel from related lawsuits if you end up with something hairy, and 5) someone to transcribe the session.

        The odds of being able to schedule EVERYONE involved except for Monday-Thursday (even Fr
    • Well, for starters, they could do it after school, rather than demanding that he skip what will probably be an entire school day. They could also have given him more than a day's notice, so that he could arrange to make up missed work and perhaps get notes for the material he has to miss.
    • by cprael (215426) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:28AM (#18798679)
      The 24 hour notice thing is called abuse of process. It goes beyond the fishing expedition aspects, and gets into "now we're going to use this to screw up your life."

      BTDT.
      • by Billosaur (927319) *

        That's the bigger concern. I think most people would agree that getting served a subpoena and having 24 or less hours notice is pretty poor sportsmanship on the part of the RIAA, but what else is new? The hole they dig for themselves gets deeper all the time.

    • by UnknowingFool (672806) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:34AM (#18798777)

      Uhh, I hate to even sound like I'm agreeing with the MAFIAA on anything, but when exactly are they supposed to depose him if not on a school day? The school week and the work week are pretty well aligned, and forcing them to either work on a weekend or wait until he's on vacation is stretching things. Their actions are certainly deplorable, especially giving a one-day notice, but doing it on a school day isn't one of those deplorable actions.

      Well special provisions are afforded to minors as opposed to adults. Also one of the objections was that the deposition would be during school hours. Certainly the plaintiff could have done it on a weekend or after school hours, but didn't do so.

      Reading the motion, it appears that the subpoena was done in a very sloppy manner which explains the short notice. It appears that the plaintiff tried to email the subpoena (not legal from what I recall) and to the wrong attorney at first. The plaintiff finally sent a subpoena to the defendants home with less than 24 hours. Now, if it is true that the plaintiff's attorney failed to deliver a subpoena in a timely manner, they should have moved back the deposition to accomodate. It appears that they didn't do that either.

    • by BlueNoteMKVI (865618) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:37AM (#18798847) Homepage
      How about some time after 3 PM? That's when school lets out around here - most businesses are open until at least 5. The motion also specifically noted that the student was supposed to take the TAKS test today. TAKS is our statewide standardized test which must be passed for promotion to the next grade or for graduation at the end of high school. If he misses the TAKS test he'll have to make it up at some point, forcing him to miss another day of school. TAKS days are only ~5 days out of the school year depending on grade level. Asking for a deposition on a non-TAKS day would be much less of a burden.
    • I dunno. Kids generally get out of school a bit earlier than adults get out of work. Why not set up the appointment for 3:30 or 4 pm if they feel they need an appointment.
    • by ec_hack (247907) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:41AM (#18798905)
      when exactly are they supposed to depose him if not on a school day?

      Well, it's not just any school day they picked. It's TAKS testing day - a statewide test in Texas that has to be passed to graduate from high school. They picked one of the worst possible days of the year to compel him to show up. They are either evil or ignorant, in my opinion.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by LWATCDR (28044)
      Last time I checked school ended around 3 pm. The workday tends to end between 5 and 6 pm.
      They could do it after school.
      Also I have to wonder about going after a minor at all. Can you claim that a minor understands copyright law? This going after kids gives me such warm fuzzys for the music companies to start with.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Jtheletter (686279)

      Uhh, I hate to even sound like I'm agreeing with the MAFIAA on anything, but when exactly are they supposed to depose him if not on a school day? The school week and the work week are pretty well aligned, and forcing them to either work

      Well in most places I'm aware of the typical highschooler gets out between 2pm to 3pm, and the typical work day ends at 5pm to 6pm. So there's at least a 2 hour overlap there, as much as 4 hours. Now, of course the RIAA lawyers will no doubt wish to make the deposition as lo

  • by stevens (84346) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:11AM (#18798389) Homepage
    An RIAA lawyer today tipped poorly at the diner where he eats breakfast.

    June Dawson, 43, waited on him this morning. She is a single mother of two, battling cancer. She was not enthusiastic about the tip: "He left a stinking dime. Next time I'm going to spit in his eggs."

    The RIAA did not respond to enquiries at press time.

  • Go figure. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Mockylock (1087585) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:11AM (#18798403) Homepage
    RIAA is basically becoming an automated bot nowadays, anyway. I'd be surprised if they don't show up in court as robots with brief cases as well.

    Someone needs to start doing something about RIAA's boundaries and arrogance, considering they're getting so careless with who they're attacking nowadays. How long will it be, before Judges and courtrooms are sick of these petty charges, and start only allowing the larger criminals who actually sell and distribute?

    Right now, you're paying less when distributing marijuana or posessing cocaine, than you are to host MP3's.. EVEN if you're a child!

    There HAS to be a line drawn somewhere.
    • Soon people will be selling smack to feed their music habit!

    • Re:Go figure. (Score:5, Insightful)

      by mpcooke3 (306161) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @12:00PM (#18799275) Homepage
      How long will it be, before Judges and courtrooms are sick of these petty charges, and start only allowing the larger criminals who actually sell and distribute?

      Or they could spend their time prosecuting price fixing media cartels.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Skevin (16048)
      > you're paying less when distributing marijuana or posessing cocaine, than you are to host MP3's

      I once got modded down for saying this, but I predicted that the RIAA and Rockstar Games would create a new GTA to reflect the truly heinous crimes in the USA:

      1 star: Making backups of your music
      2 stars: downloading music off the internet
      3 stars: living next door to someone downloading music off the internet
      4 stars: living next door to someone *accused* of downloading music off the internet
      5 stars: playing po
  • Wow (Score:4, Insightful)

    by EvilGoodGuy (811015) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:12AM (#18798425)
    RIAA is realy getting out of hand with their bullying. It's good to hear news about their losses, but their abviosly winning enough to keep harassing.
  • by aadvancedGIR (959466) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:14AM (#18798465)
    With their own lawyer and without giving enough time to prepare anything. There is only one possible explanation: what they really want is an intimidation session.
    Since he would not be facing a policeman but the opposition lawyer, can he simply walk away anytime he wants or refuse to sign anything?
    • by GodInHell (258915) *

      Since he would not be facing a policeman but the opposition lawyer, can he simply walk away anytime he wants or refuse to sign anything?
      No. The subpeona is issued by the court. There are limits, but deposition rules are waaay complex - generally they have questions prepared ahead of time and you have to go through them all.

      -GiH
      • by mkoenecke (249261)
        Sorry: the subpoena is issued by the lawyer, not the court. Perhaps you were thinking of a citation. IAATL (the "T" there stands for "Texas," since it's relevant).
    • by CyberSnyder (8122)
      Just plead the 5th and say nothing.
      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by serialdogma (883470)
        Quoteth the the fifth: "nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself".
        The key is that this is not a criminal case, it is a civil case.
  • What happened? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by jakosc (649857) * on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:15AM (#18798487) Homepage
    Also, I just realized '9:00 am the next day' was two days ago, so...what happened?
  • hmm (Score:3, Insightful)

    by nomadic (141991) * <.nomadicworld. .at. .gmail.com.> on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:16AM (#18798495) Homepage
    The fact that it's scheduled on a school day is no big deal. I've never seen a depo scheduled on a weekend.

    One day notice is pretty weird, though. Traditionally you clear dates with opposing counsel as professional courtesy, or you at least set it far enough in advance to work things out.
    • by dgatwood (11270)

      Unless the prosecution's lawyers found out that he had to take a critical test and decided to try to cause as much harm as possible to the defendant for daring to stand up to them....

      From their previous tactics, there is no reason to believe that their lawyers have any real sense of ethics or morality. They are like attack dogs who go after the person on whom their masters sick them. Frankly, there is more honor among personal injury lawyers. Chances are, they knew exactly what they were doing.

      Frank

  • TAKS Test (Score:5, Informative)

    by FerociousFerret (533780) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:21AM (#18798571)
    The real kicker here is not that it is a school day, but it is during Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) test week as well and the one day notice.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by soft_guy (534437) *

      it is during Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) test week
      At least he won't be missing anything important.
  • What would happen if you responded with "No, that will not be happening tommorow, you can reschedule for later in the week"
    • by Lxy (80823)
      You automatically lose the case. That's why this is a big deal, the RIAA is abusing the legal system.
      • You automatically lose the case. That's why this is a big deal, the RIAA is abusing the legal system.
        Enh, wrong answer.

        The subpeona is not to the defendant, it is to a "related" party. So you're looking at fines / bench warrants.

        -GiH

      • Re:Just say no? (Score:5, Informative)

        by Shadow Wrought (586631) * <shadow.wrought @ g m a i l.com> on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:33AM (#18798759) Homepage Journal
        You automatically lose the case.

        I may not be a lawyer, but I know this to be false. Don't give the RIAA any more power of fear than they already enjoy. Deponents can object, if a witness refuses the moving party can ask for a motion to compel, there are lots of rememdies other than automatically losing. The biggest problem isn't that the kid is going to miss school, its that they are attempting to take his deposition with only 24 hours notice. In my experience as a paralegal, again- IANAL, that is simply poor if not abusive practice.

  • there are laws against exploitation of legal system in order to suppress, intimidate, extort people.

    arent there any in united states ?
  • by t35t0r (751958) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:34AM (#18798779)
    The defendent's attorney said:

    The subpoena is being used for patently improper purpose, namely as a fishing expedition by plaintiffs'

    That sums up the RIAA's entire strategy.
  • This is news? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by eno2001 (527078) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:34AM (#18798781) Homepage Journal
    I think any legal proceedings trump private life regardless of whether you agree with the instigators of said proceedings. That's just the way it works. The only exception I can see is jury duty, where they allow you to miss out if you're in college. Usually.
  • by Rob T Firefly (844560) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:37AM (#18798835) Homepage Journal
    Quickly! Get Jones in there to make some funny noises with his voice until Zed scream incoherently and Mahoney makes one of his moving speeches!
  • His dad is obviously a music pirate, otherwise the RIAA wouldn't be bringing the lawsuit. Since we all know that pirates' sons always takeover the family business, it doesn't take a genius to see that the only thing this kid needs from school is enough math to count all the billions of doallars he's going to steal from the hard working middle managers of the music business.

    They're doing him a favor. Really.

  • by Quiet_Desperation (858215) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:39AM (#18798879)
    ...if the kid just ignored the order? Would the RIAA have the cops come and drag him out of his house in cuffs? What if news cameras were there? There needs to be a revelation of this crap to the wider public. Just ponderin'...
    • by Pi3141592 (942724) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:57AM (#18799225)
      Dispositions are required attendance, which is why a subpoena is generally issued to enforce them. If he blows off showing up, the consequences (if any) are entirely up to the judge who issued the subpoena.... who, if particularly pissed off that day, could find him in contempt of court and sentence him to jail time. Under the circumstances, though, I can't see any (reasonable) judge doing this.
  • It's intentional (Score:5, Interesting)

    by dkgasaway (468339) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:39AM (#18798885)
    I'm convinced the school-day deposition request is very intentional. They want the other kids to know the boy missed an important school day because he was in hot water over file sharing. It's all part of their perverse scare tactics.
  • Response: (Score:5, Insightful)

    by debrain (29228) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:40AM (#18798901) Journal
    Say your lawyer is busy. You are entitled to your choice of legal representative.

    Serving a notice for a sworn deposition on one day's notice is contrary to the rules of professional conduct, and can (and should) result in penalties against the lawyers' clients in court, as well as with with the lawyer regulatory disciplinary authority.
  • by kimvette (919543) on Thursday April 19, 2007 @11:49AM (#18799073) Homepage Journal
    1. Quit downloading RIAA music
    2. Do not share RIAA music (help prevent the spread of mindshare) (ugh, I hate buzzwords)
    3. Do not buy RIAA music (or if you do, stick to back catalogues from USED CD/record stores)
    4. Do not tune to new RIAA music on the radio so you can avoid being tempted to buy new product from RIAA

    By doing so, RIAA members will eventually either go broke or go independent, and the independent labels will rise in popularity as their buying power increases beyond that of the dying RIAA cartel.
    • 5. Rip 5 copies of your favorite RIAA-produced CD (or song collection from various CDs)

      6. Add a track with the following (more or less): "If you enjoy the music on this CD, please make it a point to compensate the artists, but not by buying the CD from which this track came." And add a small explanation for the boycott. Then: "Please make five copies of this CD and distribute randomly, including this track."

      7. Place your 5 copies in random yet conspicuous places, with only the phrase "Take me to your CD

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by hackstraw (262471)

      Here is a list of successful product boycotts: http://www.ethicalconsumer.org/boycotts/successfu l boycotts.htm [ethicalconsumer.org]

      The differences between these boycotts and an RIAA boycott is that the successful ones were more tied to ethical reasons.

      Nobody really wants to boycott the RIAA's artists. The problem is simple. We simply want a different product, but the RIAA people are so stuck into pushing expensive plastic disks on us that we have to then take home, possibly illegally rip them to a usable format. Trash the s
  • RIAA has been successful for one reason, they are doing volume over value yet again. Every time they can find someone downloading any music that looks like they own they go with plan 15B. Cease and desist, sue, profit.

    It's worked so far so why are we surprised that they are continuing with it? Expect them to continue this way. The subject of the lawsuit is faceless and nameless to them. Doesn't matter if it's a grandma, a 8 year old, or a athlete, they all are guilty to the RIAA. You know those adds t
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 19, 2007 @12:58PM (#18800285)
    OK - I am posting anonymously because I am a lawyer. First - When you subpoena someone to appear for deposition, Rule 30(b)(1) says you must give them reasonable notice. The Court is very, very likely to say that 24 hours notice is not reasonable notice. Second - It is extremely bad form, though not actually improper, to just notice someone for deposition without talking to them first about the date. Just leads to exactly this kind of problem. Third - RIAA is represented by lawyers who know better. Gardere Wynn is a Really Big Firm. They know better than to behave this way in front of Judge Atlas. Shame on them. Federal Court practices demands a higher standard of behavior on the part of the lawyers. Fourth - You have to properly serve the witness. Emailing the mom's lawyer in an attempt to serve the kids is not proper service. However, it does make sense to email mom's lawyer and ASK whether he would accept service so that you don't have to send a process server out to serve the kids. All in all, I would not expect Judge Atlas to be pleased with Gardere, Wynn's behavior here. Judge Atlas is a good judge. I'd expect her to make RIAA play according to the rules here. One of the great things about federal court is that the judges are generally of very high caliber, are extremely/proudly independent, and don't take no shit off of nobody. As long as you play by the rules, are prepared and don't waste the judge's time the solo lawyer with a brand new law license will be treated the same as hordes of grey haired lawyers from a mega-firm.
  • by HikingStick (878216) <<z01riemer> <at> <hotmail.com>> on Thursday April 19, 2007 @02:19PM (#18801727)
    Well, if that's how they want to play, I say the school should send detention notices to every one of those buggers. If they don't show up, call their parents!

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