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It's funny.  Laugh. Government Politics

Australian Comedy Group Prods APEC Security 244

Posted by kdawson
from the blame-canada dept.
ajdlinux writes "Members of the Australian comedy group The Chaser were arrested today after attempting to breach security at the APEC Leaders Conference in Sydney. Chas Licciardello and Julian Morrow were arrested, along with nine crew members (all are now free on bail), just a short distance away from the InterContinental Hotel where President Bush is staying. They had already cleared at least two police checkpoints, according to CNN, disguised as a Canadian motorcade. 'No particular reason we chose Canada,' said Taylor. 'We just thought they'd be a country who the cops wouldn't scrutinize too closely, and who feasibly would only have three cars in their motorcade — as opposed to the 20 or so gas guzzlers that Bush has brought with him.'" CNN has a photo of Licciardello, dressed as Osama bin Laden, being arrested.
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Australian Comedy Group Prods APEC Security

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  • Previous pranks (Score:4, Informative)

    by Organic User (1103717) on Thursday September 06, 2007 @07:51AM (#20493161)
    The third series of the Chasers War on Everything started yesterday. Back in the first series they did a prank with Virgin Blue booking e-tickets under the names 'Terry Wrist' and 'Al Kyder' (you can watch the clip here [google.com]). This prank should be aired this Wednesday.

    Tomorrow people living in Sydney will be getting a public holiday and the city will be complete lock down mode.
    • by sqldr (838964) on Thursday September 06, 2007 @08:09AM (#20493309)
      Their finest moment has to be wheeling a trojan horse full of greek soldiers into the turkish embassy.. (can we park this here?)
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Organic User (1103717)

        Their finest moment has to be wheeling a trojan horse full of greek soldiers into the turkish embassy.. (can we park this here?)

        Sure. Here [google.com] it is. The Australian Army actually let them into the courtyard of their base. At least then someone yelled check out the horse. But amazingly the Opera House is part of the APEC lock down yet during the Torjan Horse prank they went right past security with the horse.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by phobos13013 (813040)
      Or you can just watch all the episodes here. [abc.net.au] Now the question is, will the US pressure AU to treat them as terrorists, etc., and put them away indefinitely and levy heavy sanctions against the ABC? They should just let this one fade away, the only result of something like this will be to get the Chasers more publicity. Which actually, can be a killer in the guerilla media style they emulate.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Organic User (1103717)
        I didn't link to the ABC website because it is supposed to be for Australians only to view. They aren't doing anything to non-Australians but if at the end of the month most of their bandwidth bill is from international traffic be sure they will start ip locking it. The ABC is happy with their content being available on as many possible channels (they even upload torrents of their shows to bit torrent networks) as long as they aren't paying the bandwidth bill.
        • by pasamio (737659)
          The ABC already has this in place much like the BBC does for some parts of their site. I was in the States a few months back and couldn't get the podcast on iTunes for some reason, went to the website and got a nice message saying "Come to Australia and you can download this." Also the ABC peers onto PIPE in Australia which used to be free traffic for people, now its a rather limited set of people for who its free to disappointingly.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by unfunk (804468)

        levy heavy sanctions against the ABC?
        But... how the hell would that work, considering that the ABC is a publicly funded corporation? I'm sure if Little Johnny cut the ABC's funding much further, plenty of Aussies will be up in arms over it. It really is the last bastion of quality television journalism in this country.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by vic-traill (1038742)

        The Canadian Equivalent is 'This Hour Has 22 Minutes'. Check out the overlap between:

        The Chasers - Selling Tourism:

        http://youtube.com/watch?v=vpHGLXZ-j-Q [youtube.com]

        22 Minutes - Talking to Americans:

        http://youtube.com/watch?v=seYUbVa7L7w [youtube.com]

        Must have been colonies for too long.

    • Re:Previous pranks (Score:5, Interesting)

      by microbrewer (774971) on Thursday September 06, 2007 @11:24AM (#20495769) Homepage
      Bruce Schneier also points to one of the Chasers videos about regarding racial profiling and terrorsim on his blog .

      "How Australian Authorities Respond to Potential Terrorists

      Watch the video of how the Australian authorities react when someone -- dressed either as an American or Arab tourist -- films the Sydney Harbor Bridge and a nuclear reactor.

      The synopsis: The Arab is intercepted within three minutes both times, while the U.S. tourist is given instructions on how to get inside the nuclear facility.

      Moral for terrorists: dress like an American.

      By the way, Lucas Heights is a research reactor. It produces medical isotopes and performs research, and doesn't produce power."

      http://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2007/04/how_ australian.html [schneier.com]

      The video can be found here
      http://youtube.com/watch?v=McB9tsabPn0 [youtube.com]

    • Tomorrow people living in Sydney will...

      There's Tomorrow People in Sydney? Does Torchwood know about this?

  • by michaelmalak (91262) <michael@michaelmalak.com> on Thursday September 06, 2007 @07:54AM (#20493187) Homepage
    "No particular reason we chose Canada" ... except for the two I'm about to mention.
  • by Alicat1194 (970019) on Thursday September 06, 2007 @07:55AM (#20493193)
    Which is why they only let them through 2 checkpoints (2 being the secret number of the day).
    • by ben there... (946946) on Thursday September 06, 2007 @08:09AM (#20493315) Journal
      According to the video, they didn't catch on until one of them stepped out dressed as Osama bin Laden. The only reason they were caught was their completely absurd attire. And the security guys pat each other on the back for that. I'm not sure which part is funniest, but I'm definitely laughing.
      • by Mordough (1104631) on Thursday September 06, 2007 @11:05AM (#20495539)
        In other news, President Bush claimed victory over terrorism with the apprehension of Osama bin Laden at the Apec Leaders Conference in Sydney today. Osama had infiltrated the Australian comedy group The Chaser, to gain entry to the conference, but highly trained security guards were able to see through the deception and placed him under arrest.
  • by objekt (232270) on Thursday September 06, 2007 @07:59AM (#20493223) Homepage
    I'd recognize that hat anywhere!
  • Major embarassment (Score:5, Insightful)

    by evilgrug (915703) on Thursday September 06, 2007 @08:05AM (#20493279)
    It frightens me that there's a very real chance that had castmember Chas Licciardello not been dressed up as Osama Bin Laden, they could have made it all the way inside.

    Of course the police are spinning this and saying that due to the arrests its 'proof' that security works and the $170 million spent on security was well worth it, despite the fact that Candian flags and fake APEC stickers on the hood are all that's required to get within ten metres of the President's hotel.
    • by Richard W.M. Jones (591125) <.gro.aixenna. .ta. .hcir.> on Thursday September 06, 2007 @08:40AM (#20493635) Homepage

      It frightens me that there's a very real chance that had castmember Chas Licciardello not been dressed up as Osama Bin Laden, they could have made it all the way inside.

      It frightens you? Why?

      Perhaps our "leaders" should not have so much security. Might make them concentrate a little more on not having policies which ruin so many lives and drive people to want to murder them, eh?

      Personally I think it's a huge shame that I can't walk up to the Prime Minister and argue with him about his policies.

      Rich.

      • by Organic User (1103717) on Thursday September 06, 2007 @09:02AM (#20493863)

        Personally I think it's a huge shame that I can't walk up to the Prime Minister and argue with him about his policies.
        You can catch up with John Howard every morning during daily walks. The Chaser did a prank about this during the first series after a school kid came up to Howard with a screw driver and hugged him. You can watch it here [google.com] (low quality).
        • It'd be nice if everyone could chat with the leaders of millions, but it can't be done-- the numbers are impossible. If the President of the United States tried to see each US citizen individually for just one second, it'd take more than 10 years to get around to everyone. You'll have to settle for arguing with the leaders of mere hundreds or thousands of people, or become a leader yourself. Or make a big campaign donation, I've heard that can work entirely too well.
      • by TubeSteak (669689) on Thursday September 06, 2007 @09:03AM (#20493883) Journal

        It frightens you? Why?
        Because when Heads of State violently die it tends to cause chaos, political/economic instability and/or wars.

        Perhaps our "leaders" should not have so much security. Might make them concentrate a little more on not having policies which ruin so many lives and drive people to want to murder them, eh?
        That's the dumbest thing I've heard today.
        There is always going to be some extreme nutters who hate the current leaders and their policies.

        Personally I think it's a huge shame that I can't walk up to the Prime Minister and argue with him about his policies.
        I agree that it's a shame, but you have at least one Representative. Talk to them. They are your voice to the PM.
        • by deniable (76198)
          And if you're in Benalong?
        • by Dr Caleb (121505)
          "Because when Heads of State violently die it tends to cause chaos, political/economic instability and/or wars."

          Perhaps if the citizens want you dead, you are doing something wrong? As you and other posters point out - you can't stop the crazies, but you can stop the regular Joes by simply doing your job well enough not to anger anyone that much.

          " I agree that it's a shame, but you have at least one Representative. Talk to them. They are your voice to the PM."

          Ahhh, to be young and naive again.
          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by Clover_Kicker (20761)

            Perhaps if the citizens want you dead, you are doing something wrong?
            Yeah, Lincoln had it coming.

            And don't get me started on Garfield.

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by cheezedawg (413482)

            As you and other posters point out - you can't stop the crazies, but you can stop the regular Joes by simply doing your job well enough not to anger anyone that much.
            What world do you live in where plotting an assasination doesn't qualify a person as "crazy"?
            • by bentcd (690786)

              What world do you live in where plotting an assasination doesn't qualify a person as "crazy"?
              I would say that depends entirely on the assassination in question. To take the lazy (easy) example, in my opinion the only thing that was crazy about plotting the assassination on Hitler was that it took them so long to get around to it.
            • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

              by Dr Caleb (121505)
              "What world do you live in where plotting an assasination doesn't qualify a person as "crazy"?"

              What are the reasons the assassination is being plotted? Voices in your head?

              I live in a world where the CIA tried to kill Castro several times, simply because he took back his country from gangsters. Castro was doing what he thought right. So did the CIA.

              Here in my country of Canada, we haven't had a Prime Minister assasinated, or even attempted. None have been worthy enough, before or since Trudeau. My Prov
              • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

                by aevan (903814)
                Are you nuts? Last guy who went after Jean got a soapstone carving upside the head. A monster I tell you!

                Seriously though, choice political attack weapon for Canada is pie...the only risk Howard would have been in was were it to have had been beef.
              • by Don853 (978535)
                The guy who killed JFK was a very unimportant person with delusions of grandeur who wanted to be relevant. There may have been people who wanted him dead, but the guy who killed him just wanted to be important. The guy who tried to kill Reagen was just crazy. Martin Luther King and John Lennon, while not politicians, were public figures killed without really doing anything wrong. Of 42 US Presidents, 4 have been assassinated and 4 more survived assassination attempts. I would certainly want protection
                • Not to wish ill-will on anyone, but I wish Ford would have gotten it just so history could record a presidential assassin named Squeaky.
        • by bug1 (96678)
          "Because when Heads of State violently die it tends to cause chaos, political/economic instability and/or wars."

          And if the world is already in chaos, political(lame duck president in US, AUS PM might loose his own seat in a few months)/economic instability(non-prime lending, reserve banks around the world trying to hold it together) and/or wars (iraq, afganistan and others that dont get convenient media coverage) ?
        • by sasha328 (203458) on Thursday September 06, 2007 @06:08PM (#20500879) Homepage

          It frightens you? Why?
          Because when Heads of State violently die it tends to cause chaos, political/economic instability and/or wars.


          This is true for absolute leaders (such as in the USA). For Westminister system democracies (UK, Australia, Canada etc) the death of a leader does not lead to instability. The party will usually vote for a replacment leader. It is the party that leads the country (with a strong leader obviously) rather than an individual.
           
          The reason I'm saying this is because in such countries, the leader, although protected, is not living in total isolation behind barricades and barriers. I've seen our leaders (in Australia) on many occasions, and I usually cross to the other side of the street so I don't bump into them.
           
          I remember one occasion in Perth when the defence minister (back then) walked in with his family to a food court to have lunch. No guards, no security (at least none we could see).
          That's the kind of country I want to live in.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by IBBoard (1128019)

        Personally I think it's a huge shame that I can't walk up to the Prime Minister and argue with him about his policies.

        I think there's an issue of practicality there, though. If we could walk up to our leaders (without having to pretend to be Canadians in a motorcade) then there'd be too many people crammed around them all trying to argue about dozens of different things!

        If only politicians could do what the people want, rather than what the people need.

        (I'll leave it up to the reader as to whether the previ

      • by crush (19364)
        Why?

        Think of the children you monster. If you're not cowering under the bed then ... oh why do I bother, you're obviously some sort of a terrorist or you wouldn't want to argue with your democratically elected representative.
      • by Quiet_Desperation (858215) on Thursday September 06, 2007 @11:40AM (#20496001)

        Perhaps our "leaders" should not have so much security. Might make them concentrate a little more on not having policies which ruin so many lives and drive people to want to murder them, eh?

        John Hinckley shot Ronald Reagan because Hinckley was obsessed on Jodie Foster. Public figures, political or not, are lightning rods for every type of kook under the sun.

        I'm sorry we don't live in the rosy, bunny filled universe you seem to desire, but that's the way things are.

        What's the frequency, Kenneth?

    • by SlayerofGods (682938) on Thursday September 06, 2007 @08:51AM (#20493757)
      Actually... if they hadn't been stopped he wouldn't have gotten out. Therefore they were pulled over first, which seems to indicate that the security was on to them at least some what.

      And truthfully from a security stand point this makes sense.
      You don't want to stop a motorcade at the first checkpoint otherwise an enemy (I know it's Australia, just saying) could just set up watching the check point and wait for his target to be stopped there. What they should be doing is wave an 'obvious' motorcade through the first level of security and then check them out deeper in where it's safe.

      Further the article doesn't make it clear what these check points were. Perhaps the first one was just a couple of guys on foot charged with turning away anyone that doesn't have clear business in the area, and not what everyone pictures when they think of a check point as barbed wire, sandbags, gates, guys with machine guns, ect. /Just saying
      • by ben there... (946946) on Thursday September 06, 2007 @11:45AM (#20496085) Journal

        Actually... if they hadn't been stopped he wouldn't have gotten out. Therefore they were pulled over first, which seems to indicate that the security was on to them at least some what.

        And truthfully from a security stand point this makes sense.
        Only one problem. That's not what happened [news.com.au].

        A source inside The Chaser's War on Everything revealed the team never expected to get so far. The skit had been approved by ABC lawyers but was written in the assumption they would be stopped at the first checkpoint.

        Instead they were waved through the first on Macquarie St, then a second, which had sniffer dogs, and eventually stopped themselves at Bridge St.

        "As they did Chas got out of a car dressed as Osama bin Laden and said something like 'I'm an important world leader why don't I have a seat at the APEC table?'. Apparently that was the first time the police realised it was not authentic and they swooped in and arrested everybody," the source said.
        • Only one problem. That's not what happened.

          And this is why I just said I've given up trust in most news services.

          How can they not see the difference between.

          The convoy was pulled over - IE the cops either knew something was up or were about to find out when they asked for ID.
          and
          eventually stopped themselves - IE the cops knew jack sh-t and if the cars had been loaded with bombs or a bunch of armed terrorists they could have gone anywhere they wanted.

          So it does indeed seem like the cops f-ed up and

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Rogerborg (306625)
      >It frightens me

      How many new laws and restrictions on liberty would it take to reassure you?

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by JonathanR (852748)
      It doesn't frighten me at all. The whole episode is a complete farce.

      Tell me: Why can the CBD of the biggest Australian metropolis suffer a complete lock-down in the name of a pyjama-party for a few world leaders, while Melbourne can't even host a car-free day [theage.com.au] in part of its CBD? It strikes me that something is wrong with our priorities.
  • by .c (115916) on Thursday September 06, 2007 @08:05AM (#20493283)

    "Whatever you think of the humor of 'The Chaser,' the honest truth is they were clearly not going to harm anybody in a physical way," Downer said. "They presumably were, as is the nature of their show, aiming to humiliate a lot of well-known people."
    For a politician, this type of harm could be career-ending -- public opinion is everything.
    • This is Australia (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Chuck Chunder (21021)
      We already know all politicians are dick heads, we don't worship them (or want to) as many Americans seem to do.
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by lazybeam (162300)
      Not in Australia. Pollies here love being satired!
    • by deniable (76198)
      Have you seen Alexander Downer? This will help his image.

      His best moment, IMHO, was a radio interview where the headphones had a problem. "It's broken," BANG, "It's FUCKING BROKEN."
    • by apt142 (574425)
      My question then is, What could they do to make him look [bushorchimp.com] any dumber [about.com] than [youtube.com] he [youtube.com] already [wikipedia.org] is [rawstory.com]?
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by dbIII (701233)
      Not for Downer. This guy was mixed up in an incident where Saddam was bribed for over 300 million. A long string of incidents show he's a living example of why hereditary leadership is a bad idea - if his grandfather had not been sucessful he would not control a political faction and would be almost unemployable.
  • by hools1234 (789912) on Thursday September 06, 2007 @08:06AM (#20493295) Homepage
    These guys are seriously the funniest thing on Australian TV. They are extremely witty and some of their comedy is so well thought out, you really wonder where they get it from. There is some great footage of this weeks episode on Youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DxXAr0R43dQ [youtube.com] where they try to see how big a weapon they can smuggle in to a jail, including a rocket, a small canon (disguised poorly as a babies pram) and a tank! Some very clever gags about APEC also. Have they gone too far this time though? With times so security conscious, dressing up as Osama and getting that close to the US Presidents quarters, they are lucky they weren't fired upon! Funny though.
    • by garcia (6573) on Thursday September 06, 2007 @09:11AM (#20493979)
      Have they gone too far this time though? With times so security conscious, dressing up as Osama and getting that close to the US Presidents quarters, they are lucky they weren't fired upon!

      No, they haven't gone too far. By pointing out that the US has a huge and unnecessary motorcade in a foreign country, it opens my eyes to yet another fleecing of America by the douchebags in office. By pointing out that people may be arrested for nothing more than a prank mostly because it embarrassed the security forces supposedly increased for the visit of someone "so important", it shows me that the countries we live in suck compared to 10 years ago.

      Someone needs to continually point out the failures and by doing it with comedic value, a larger majority of people will pay attention.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by deniable (76198)
      That's what one of the senior cops said. Something about all the snipers on the building would have shot them. If that's the case, the snipers are a bigger threat than a terrorist.
      • by sr180 (700526)

        Dont worry, the snipers are wearing fluro yellow high visability vests, so you'll be able to see them.

        Photos here. [nissansilvia.com]

  • hilair (Score:4, Insightful)

    by SkunkPussy (85271) on Thursday September 06, 2007 @08:06AM (#20493297) Journal
    I've seen some of their clips on youtube and they're pretty damn funny!!

    Over here in the UK, the main Aussie telly we're blessed with are neighbours and home & away - I would swap war on everything for neighbours any day!!
    • by StikyPad (445176)
      That's funny.. I would swap my neighbors for war on anything.

      And for the record, I'd swap the show as well. For those who don't know, most Aussie TV, especially Neighbours, is about the quality of the 20th century BBC: low production value and weak acting. If you can get beyond that, the plots are pretty mundane as well. I just read that they apparently switched to HD for the 2007 season, but before that, viewership was severely declining. It's definitely a solid Meh, whose main purpose is to provide A
  • by elrous0 (869638) * on Thursday September 06, 2007 @08:12AM (#20493331)
    After their arrest, the Bush administration and Justice Department officials immediately hold a press conference to brag about how they've busted up another terrorist cell, ending with "See, all these new wiretapping laws are working!"
  • by Dystopian Rebel (714995) on Thursday September 06, 2007 @08:23AM (#20493443) Journal
    Guard: Where are you from?
    Australian Mimicking A Canadian: We're the Canadian delegation. Where's the hockey rink?
    Guard: We don't have a hockey rink here, Sir. [Addressing AMAC bin Laden.] Are you from the Middle East, Sir?
    AMAC-BL: Yes, from Montreal.
    Guard: Who is Margaret Atwood?
    AMAC-BL: [pause] She's the wife of Wayne Gretzky.
    Guard: Step out of the car, Sir.
  • by essence (812715) on Thursday September 06, 2007 @08:38AM (#20493591) Homepage Journal
    You can get some grass roots coverage of the protests against APEC at Sydney Indymedia [indymedia.org.au].
  • by Malekin (1079147) on Thursday September 06, 2007 @08:53AM (#20493773)
    I feel that it was utterly un-Australian to arrest these guys. It was a complete waste of police & justice system resources, and really only a pathetic attempt to legitimise the $170 million spent on the ridiculous security theatre show borking up Sydney's CBD.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Rogerborg (306625)
      Calm down, Sparky. What would be un-Whatever would be to charge or convict them. Merely detaining them and then moving them off site while you figure out if they are who they say they are is common sense.
      • "What would be un-Whatever would be to charge or convict them."

        They were released on bail after being charged under new security laws, the charge carries a maximum penalty of 6 months jail time if convicted.

        Anyone who watches their show on a regular basis knows these guys have intellegence, wit, and most importantly a huge set of balls.
    • by dbIII (701233)
      To make things worse they were arrested under a newly minted law designed for occasions like this at the conference. People should see the humor in this - earlier this year we actually changed the gun laws for Cheney the night before his arrival. We're doing a lot of pandering to a playboy King (we shutdown a big chunk of sydney so he could go for a mountain bike ride on the other side of the city) and the Prince at his right hand - how long is it before the USA gets a President again? You are doing mona
  • So those who tag themselves as the leaders of the free world are restraining their populace with barbed wire fences, armed riot police, and undemocratic bans on demonstration. Howard's use of the word `violent' (which the media has perpetuated without question) to describe protesters is a pretext to take away more free speech and freedom of assembly rights and to characterise /all/ dissent as criminal. Everyone remember Heiligendamm earlier this summer? The APEC summit will turn out the same way.
    • by mabu (178417)
      The worst part about all this is that there will probably be thousands of protesters with legitimate issues they want raised. And the news media will find the one tripped-out, bearded, hippy-dude beating on a djembe screaming "legalize meth!" and splatter that all over the television as an example of a typical activist.
  • eep (Score:3, Funny)

    by Verte (1053342) on Thursday September 06, 2007 @09:48AM (#20494475)
    Remember why the Glasshouse got axed? You can't be critical of the Liberal party's ridiculous actions! Especially when [click]
  • by smegged (1067080) on Thursday September 06, 2007 @10:14AM (#20494813)
    Just an FYI for everyone out there, the Chaser is a show which is broadcast by the ABC, a PUBLICALLY FUNDED channel here in Australia. They constantly poke fun of security, politicians and current affairs shows (among other things). They are a great example of democracy done right.

    For some interesting clips see:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xs3SfNANtig [youtube.com]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnP0snh_1cU [youtube.com]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W3grHjibNdA [youtube.com]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-BOMOVV2pf0 [youtube.com]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vc5xTZGUrRQ [youtube.com]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GViD0Zwc3Bg [youtube.com]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D-6F8GN8eXI [youtube.com]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nwJ9s1RdGhc& [youtube.com]

    Many more are freely available on youtube and other sites. The ABC doesn't mind you distributing them either.
  • Probably lucky that they were in Sydney and not Singapore. Glad to hear that no one was hurt in the end.
  • by Eevee1 (1147279) on Thursday September 06, 2007 @06:28PM (#20501117)
    $1545454.55 AUD (Take 20-25% off to get USD) per person. That's a complete and utter bargain. AND THEY'LL BE WALKING OUT THE DOOR AFTER PRICES HAVE BEEN MASSIVELY REDUCED!
  • I've been waiting for this, and then I slept in. Oh well.

    In Soviet Russia, Sydney locks down APEC.

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