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Penny Arcade On NPR

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  • Grats! (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Lifyre (960576) on Monday December 29, 2008 @09:54AM (#26257229)
    I love seeing Tycho and Gabe (Jerry and Mike if you will) getting the recognition they deserve. Penny Arcade has broken ground in success and shown how it is possible to build a business model providing a primarily free product. The key is having a product people want. I just wish the great works they've done such as Child's Play and PAX had gotten more than just a mention. Perhaps some people who listen to NPR will branch out and look at the seedy underworld of online comics now.
    • Re:Grats! (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Drakkenmensch (1255800) on Monday December 29, 2008 @10:01AM (#26257301)
      These guys don't get half the recognition they deserve. They've built from scratch a gigantic charity organization that gives thousands of kids a ray of sunshine in a time of their life that would otherwise be dark and bleak. That alone needs to be given the props they deserve to get, and that's not even scratching the surface here. It's most probably because of the success of PAX that E3 is rethinking its closed-doors invitation-only no-booth-bunnies rebranding failure. (That, and the stockholders weren't too crazy about their latest idea, the "First 1000 attendees get gouged with an icepick" promotion)
      • Thousands? Try MILLIONS! http://childsplaycharity.com/ [childsplaycharity.com] and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child's_Play_(charity) [wikipedia.org] To date they have raised over 4 Million.
        • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

          by Avogadro65 (942457)

          Thousands? Try MILLIONS!...To date they have raised over 4 Million.

          So you're saying they've raised over 4 million kids? Impressive.

      • by slapout (93640)

        I think it's great what they've done for the kids. But I think part of the problem is that the comics themselves aren't exactly kid-friendly. It's like they go out of their way to include the F word in every strip.

        • by centuren (106470)

          I think it's great what they've done for the kids. But I think part of the problem is that the comics themselves aren't exactly kid-friendly. It's like they go out of their way to include the F word in every strip.

          That's sort of part of the point of Penny Arcade doing Child's Play. The strip isn't for children, just like a huge portion of video games aren't for children.

          It's a site for adults, and a partial motivation behind Child's Play was to show that there's more to the demographic of adult gamers than the stereotype of slackers who sit around playing violent video games.

          Penny Arcade has been so successful, I think, because they have managed to serve as representatives for this community so well. Gamers identify

        • by Sasayaki (1096761)

          Firstly, not everything has to be kid friendly. In fact, I'm happy if most of the world isn't kid friendly- and I had that opinion when I was 13, too.

          Secondly, they've heard it all and worse before... yes, irrespective of what ages they are. They've heard fuck before and know what it means- trust me.

        • by drinkypoo (153816)

          I think it's great what they've done for the kids. But I think part of the problem is that the comics themselves aren't exactly kid-friendly. It's like they go out of their way to include the F word in every strip.

          You should have heard me at the age of 13. For that matter, about the best kid I know was allowed to cuss at home from earlier than that so long as he didn't do it at school, and there has been nary a problem.

          These days, kids are bored with porn. Which I guess is why you can get such longevity out of a meme involving two girls and a cup.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by jellomizer (103300)

      How is this model different... They have adds which bring in revenue for their site, also they sell merchandise based on their brand. So by creating a site that caters to pleasing many people they have created demand for their crap, and their popularity has became a profitable spot to advertise. That seems the same as Hasbro's 1980's money making method. Sell toys advertise by making a TV show about them and also collect advertising revenue from the TV show.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by rob1980 (941751)
        That seems the same as Hasbro's 1980's money making method.

        Which would make sense, because most of the folks I know who read PA (myself included) were the target audience for Hasbro, Kenner, etc. in the 1980s.

        M.A.S.K. ruled so much.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Dun Malg (230075)

        How is this model different... They have adds which bring in revenue for their site, also they sell merchandise based on their brand. So by creating a site that caters to pleasing many people they have created demand for their crap, and their popularity has became a profitable spot to advertise.

        Well yeah, I think that's exactly the point. Too many 'tards out there think there oughtta be a way to put up a web site, wave a magic wand (google ads), and get rich, and then complain that providing free content doesn't pay the rent. PA demonstrates that nothing about making money via the internet is substantially any different than real life.

        • Well it generally goes down to you need to work for your money. If you offer a technology that is self running, then you may perhaps get a quick boost but then other people will copy the idea and you go down the tube as you can't be price competitive. The thing is if you want to stay in business and make money you need to work for it. Even if you are based on adds you better make sure that you are creating content that people want, and you have to keep it up. Just as installing Slashcode and allowing gene

      • by Inthewire (521207)
        Ads, you dolt. It's short for advertisments. "their popularity has became a profitible spot to advetise?" I hope you're doing this on purpose.
    • Re:Grats! (Score:5, Insightful)

      by PriceIke (751512) on Monday December 29, 2008 @11:43AM (#26258233)

      Agreed. Jerry and Mike not only know their audience but they are both fountains of talent, and their lifelong friendship gives them such a depth of knowledge about each other that they can play to each other's strengths. The result is an authentic, insightful and usually hilarious window into gamer culture and lifestyles. They've taken their wildly successful online product, which they disseminate for free, and leveraged it into not only an immensely popular (and probably highly lucrative) gamer convention but also started an eyebrow-raising global charity which has brought smiles to thousands (if not millions) of children the world over.

      I think of these two people as examples of the kind of rare but wonderful success that can be found when one simply does what s/he loves, and chooses to embrace what s/he is. That mixed with healthy doses of dedication and luck can have alchemical results beyond the wildest expectations.

      Toast to Jerry and Mike!

    • Re: (Score:1, Offtopic)

      by Jeff DeMaagd (2015)

      Now we just need to convince NPR to put the rest of their shows on the web in podcast form. I am not at my computer when I listen to audio shows, my time doesn't work that way. Their local FM station doesn't tune well either, static and dropouts galore.

      • by mattack2 (1165421)

        I don't know what percentage of their shows are available as a podcast, but simply searching for 'npr' in iTunes showed almost 3 full pages of podcasts. (Ironically, I couldn't find _this_ specific story in a quick search, but I was looking for 'weekend' in the podcast title since the date line also says "Weekend Edition Sunday".)

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Maybe I'm one of the few on Slashdot who "don't get" their cartoons. I do enjoy a few that relate to games I like. But I always thought they were a bit overhyped in the past. (The art is kind of meh IMHO. Topics sometimes too trendy.)

    I respect them a lot though. They have been around like a decade. They survived the "eFront.com fiasco" and Internet Bubble. (Which took a lot of backbone.) And after that they set up a nice deal with "Child's Play" charities, conventions, etc.

    Call me dumb, but I never

    • by Anonymous Coward on Monday December 29, 2008 @10:21AM (#26257445)

      Obligatory [xkcd.com]

      • Actually, I think this [xkcd.com] is actually more in the spirit of the poster's complaint.
      • by drsquare (530038)

        Well, at least he knows he's shit. Shame the same can't be said about the Ctrl+Alt+Del creator.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by samkass (174571)

      Well, no humor appeals to everyone. You're allowed to dislike their comics. I'm allowed to think libertarianism would never work. You're still allowed to post. :)

      The point is that they were one of the first independent internet comics that managed to make a living at their work, and have used their success for good instead of evil. Kudos to them.

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by feepness (543479)
        What's the -ism for your belief system so I can quickly brand it as unfeasible? Thanks...
  • Link? (Score:4, Informative)

    by kingcool1432 (993113) on Monday December 29, 2008 @11:42AM (#26258217)
    Would it be too much to expect the summary to actually link to this Penny Arcade comic? Or should I go crawl back under the rock I've been living in? :) Anyway, for the too-lazy-to-google set, here's the link http://www.penny-arcade.com/ [penny-arcade.com]
    • Re:Link? (Score:5, Funny)

      by rk (6314) on Monday December 29, 2008 @01:36PM (#26259425) Journal

      Yeah, and while we're on the topic of mysteries, can any of you guys tell me what this "Linux" thing is you all keep talking about? It keeps getting mentioned, and I hoped I'd be able to figure it out from context, but I've had no luck so far.

      You can live under rocks? Why doesn't anybody tell me these things!?

    • Question (Score:2, Redundant)

      by diskofish (1037768)
      Am I the only one who doesn't find these comics funny? I just find it to be an uninspired commentary on videogames and geek stuff.
  • It's interesting that the submitter didn't think that the radio show that aired the story was worth mentioning. (Weekend Edition Sunday [npr.org], which I used to listen to a lot before the podcast glut took over my headphones.) Apparently NPR now has a lot of listeners who only know them through their podcasts.

    That's beginning to include me, even though I've been listening to NPR since most of you were still in grade school. I used to be fanatical about their content. They seemed to cater to people with more intelli

  • I enjoy all 3 of the comics mentioned in the summary, but why does XKCD get so great of reviews? I mean I understand that it makes some really good science/math/computer/nerd puns, but there is no artistic direction, and the way it deals with love/relationships reminds me a high school Thespian Club. That being said, Achewood has some of the best writing in (ha ha funny) comics in any medium, and Penny-Arcade has created a massive charity from donations from people who are supposed to care about society.
  • by John Pfeiffer (454131) on Monday December 29, 2008 @04:53PM (#26261455) Homepage

    Just a tad under three minutes, and it's some random guy talking about P-A. I was hoping they might be interviewing the duo themselves. :( Their interviews are always quite hilarious. Then again, I guess the point was to convey what P-A is to 'normal' people, which I don't think those two can do, lol.

The first Rotarian was the first man to call John the Baptist "Jack." -- H.L. Mencken

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