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Rotten Office Fridge Cleanup Sends 7 To Hospital 410

Posted by samzenpus
from the step-away-from-the-handle dept.
bokske writes "An office worker cleaning a fridge full of rotten food created a smell so noxious that it sent seven co-workers to the hospital and made many others ill. Firefighters had to evacuate the AT&T building in downtown San Jose on Tuesday, after the flagrant fumes prompted someone to call 911. A hazmat team was called in. Just another day at the office."

*

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Rotten Office Fridge Cleanup Sends 7 To Hospital

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  • Paaaleeese (Score:4, Insightful)

    by FredFredrickson (1177871) * on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @01:21PM (#27941195) Homepage Journal
    It's one thing if spores cause an infection- but going to the hospital cause you don't like a smell? I mean come on. Grow a pair, you know?

    Bring on the comments about how so-and-so knows somebody's grandma that was so affected by smell xyz that something bad happened. Big whoop. Unless it's literally chemicals that are affecting your health, or an airborne pathogen, you don't need medical attention.

    And please, just because you don't have a sense of smell, doesn't mean you're immune to pathogens.

    So much wrong.. must resist reference to idle section... oops too late!
    • Re:Paaaleeese (Score:5, Insightful)

      by antifoidulus (807088) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @01:28PM (#27941315) Homepage Journal
      It wasn't really the smell per se, it was the mixture of rotting food and harsh cleaning chemicals that caused a lot of the people to vomit. The warning labels on those things are pretty lengthy.
      • Re:Paaaleeese (Score:5, Insightful)

        by MyLongNickName (822545) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @02:04PM (#27941931) Journal

        Untrue. The article explicitly states that the person cleaning the fridge was not affected (effected?) due to allergies which prevent her from smelling. Allergies do not give you superhuman resistance to chlorine gas.

        • Re:Paaaleeese (Score:4, Informative)

          by FredFredrickson (1177871) * on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @02:09PM (#27942009) Homepage Journal
          You've got to be the only person here who read the article.. I picked up on that, and I'm flamebait for picking on people who don't like gross smells. If there was a truely harmful chemical or spore in the air, she would've been affected too. Thanks everybody. Not only didn't you RTFA, but you didn't RTFC either.
          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            by Volante3192 (953645)

            Smell alone can cause violent reactions. While I was in the kitchen one time, for some reason the smell of the cut tomatoes got to me and I started getting very ill.

            The tomatoes were perfectly fine, there was nothing toxic in the air, but the tomato smell was just so incredibly overpowering I was a hair's width away from puking.

            • Re:Paaaleeese (Score:5, Insightful)

              by MyLongNickName (822545) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @02:53PM (#27942743) Journal

              I think there is a difference between "the smell of the diaper made me hurl" to "the smell caused me to go to the hospital". Maybe I am wrong, but I would tend to think some folks might have overreacted a bit to the stench. Sounds to me like one person became ill, and then the programmed herd instinct took over. Then, the cynical side of me wonders how many folks wanted a day off of work.

              • by FredFredrickson (1177871) * on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @03:01PM (#27942853) Homepage Journal
                That's what I'm saying. Buck up! It's just a smell. Some people work around bad smells, they learn to live with it.

                Unfortunately, I am now officially this thread's troll.
                • Re:Paaaleeese (Score:4, Interesting)

                  by Hurricane78 (562437) <deleted@slashd o t .org> on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @04:02PM (#27943859)

                  Well, they should get a free training day as a digestion tower diver from their boss.

                  If I were their boss, I'd totally do it. :D

                  And: Yes, that is an actual job! You wear scuba gear, and jump into a 40C hot pool of shit, pee, an other "enzymes" and stuff. I think you have to have a dead nose and no wife to do that job. ^^

                • Re:Paaaleeese (Score:4, Insightful)

                  by Volante3192 (953645) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @04:41PM (#27944503)

                  Mocking medical conditions isn't really a good way to endear yourself.

                  Further, these people weren't exactly garbage men, plumbers or others who have to expect green haze during the daily grind. This is cube farm work. These people didn't expect to be drenched in the foul odor of Beelzebub's flatulence when they clocked in.

                  Finally, when you get a call about an office keeling over from smells, are you going to (a) figure out what happened or (b) make sure the people are all right? I'm not the most humanitarian person but I'm going to pick (b) and err on the side of caution.

                  The one cleaning had allergies and wasn't affected. Good. But maybe she just has a poor sense of smell through genetics? Some people can't taste broken aspirin. Others...can.

                • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

                  by Jah-Wren Ryel (80510)

                  That's what I'm saying. Buck up! It's just a smell. Some people work around bad smells, they learn to live with it.

                  If a smell makes you puke are you sure it was just the smell and not something else? How do you tell?

                  Nature has conditioned most animals, including us, to puke and otherwise have bad reactions to harmful substances. Sometimes it is simply due to some sort of genetic programming wherein our bodies know that some bad tastes and bad smells mean something is fucked up and we don't want that shit anywhere near us.

          • What would you do? (Score:5, Insightful)

            by spun (1352) <loverevolutionar ... minus physicist> on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @05:50PM (#27945255) Journal

            So here you are working in an office building, when you start to smell a terrible stench of decay and harsh chemicals. You have no idea what caused this smell. You then proceed to vomit due to the smell, but you don't know that it is only because of the smell. What would you do?

            You got marked troll because you demonstrated not only an inability to put yourself into someone else's shoes, but a smug sense of superiority over those people that you can't empathize with. And then you had the gracelessness to whine about getting marked troll. Paaaleeeese.

      • Ammonia & Bleach (Score:5, Informative)

        by Anenome (1250374) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @02:24PM (#27942235)

        I think it was when they began cleaning with bleach and chased it with ammonia that did the trouble started.

        For the uninitiated: http://everything2.com/title/Mixing%2520bleach%2520and%2520ammonia%2520does%2520not%2520make%2520a%2520super%2520cleaner [everything2.com]

        "Exactly why should you not mix ammonia and bleach?

        In a nutshell, the combination produces corrosive substances in your airways that cause your lungs to fill with fluid. You drown.

        Household bleach is usually about 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl).When mixed with ammonia (NH3), mono- and di-chloramines are formed: NH2Cl and NH2Cl2. These cause respiratory tract irritation, tearing, and nausea.

        Worse, these compounds decompose in water to form ammonia gas (nasty in itself) and hypochlorous acid. This last in the presence of water forms hydrochloric acid and nascent (monoatomic) oxygen, which are highly reactive and can lead to pulmonary edema and pneumonia.

        There are several ways household ammonia and bleach can react. All of them are dangerous.

        Reaction type 1: Ammonia directly reacts with bleach to form hydrazine (N2H4, which, in addition to being extremely poisonous, can burn even in the absence of air! It explodes on contact with rust!

        2NH3 + NaOCl -----> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O

        Reaction type 2: Bleach hydrolyzes into sodium hydroxide and hypochlorous acid, which in turn decompose into chlorine gas and nascent oxygen (both poisonous). The chlorine gas in turn reacts with the ammonia to form chloramines, also very poisonous.

        NaOCl -----> NaOH + HOCl
        HOCl ---> HCl + O (monatomic oxygen)
        NaOCl + 2HCl -----> Cl2 + NaCl + H2O
        2NH3 + Cl2 -------> 2NH2Cl (chloramine)
        4NH3 + 2Cl2 ------> 2NHCl2 (dichloramine)
        6NH3 + 3Cl2 ------> NCl3 (trichloramine or nitrogen trichloride)"

      • Hysteria (Score:3, Insightful)

        by John Hasler (414242)

        > It wasn't really the smell per se...

        No. It was the hysteria. "Ohno! A smell! A SMELL!! A STRONG SMELL!!! Oh my god! We're all going to DIE!! Call 911!"

        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by iron-kurton (891451)
          It was a hybrid swine/mold flu that is now attempting to transmit itself through AT&T's network. The bit about person having allergies is clearly a cover-up. It's the only explanation.
    • Re:Paaaleeese (Score:5, Informative)

      by ShadowBlasko (597519) <shadowblasko AT gmail DOT com> on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @01:28PM (#27941323) Homepage
      There are quite a few molds and other items that can cause serious respiratory distress for those of us allergic to them. Fast acting too. When I got off the plane in Australia and was exposed to new pollens I my body had never experienced, I was horizontal on a gurney getting anti-histamine treatments within 30 minutes!
    • by meow27 (1526173) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @01:31PM (#27941351)
      vegimite..... just smelling that is good enough to go to the hospital.

      just smelling it killed my apetite for a month.

      new Zealanders eat it like as if it were creamcheese

      could have been vegimite :P
      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by Peter Simpson (112887)

        It's "Vegemite" and yes, it is an "acquired taste"

        (best acquired in childhood)

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by iron-kurton (891451)
        That stuff is bad-tasting shoe polish. And I ate shoe-polish as a kid.
    • Re:Paaaleeese (Score:5, Informative)

      by Spazmania (174582) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @01:32PM (#27941365) Homepage

      It's one thing if spores cause an infection- but going to the hospital cause you don't like a smell? I mean come on. Grow a pair, you know?

      RTFA. The fridge was full of mold. Many folks are allergic to mold, especially in quantity.

      • by Andy Dodd (701)

        Some forms of mold can be toxic even to those not specifically allergic to mold.

        A friend of mine and his wife got quite sick after cleaning out her brother's fridge, and he still has some lingering health effects from the mold exposure.

      • Re:Paaaleeese (Score:4, Interesting)

        by FredFredrickson (1177871) * on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @01:57PM (#27941825) Homepage Journal
        Since nobody read my comment, I'll reiterate-

        Unless it's literally chemicals that are affecting your health, or an airborne pathogen, you don't need medical attention.

        Now, from TFA:

        Authorities said the worker who cleaned the fridge didn't need treatment - she can't smell because of allergies.

        I don't think a lack of the sense of smell makes you immuned. They were grossed out by a harmless smell, apparently. RTFA.

    • Unless it's literally chemicals that are affecting your health, or an airborne pathogen, you don't need medical attention.

      What do you think odors are? They are chemicals.

      If chemicals induce vomiting, they are affecting your health... repeated vomiting can have some nasty effects (like difficulties breathing due to rib muscle injury, or major capillary damage that can affect eyesight, or aspiration of stomach contents leading to pulmonary infection).

      Never mind potential allergic reactions.

      And never mind

      • Re:Paaaleeese (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Chabo (880571) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @01:49PM (#27941687) Homepage Journal

        If chemicals induce vomiting, they are affecting your health... repeated vomiting can have some nasty effects (like difficulties breathing due to rib muscle injury, or major capillary damage that can affect eyesight, or aspiration of stomach contents leading to pulmonary infection).

        Don't forget vocal chord rupture. [progrock.com] James Labrie of Dream Theater had this happen after eating in Cuba and getting food poisoning. Ten years later, he was fully recovered. In the meantime, he had nowhere near the vocal range that he used to. (parodied in the James Labrie Action Figure [blobvandam.com] commercial)

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by DynaSoar (714234)

      Bring on the comments about how so-and-so knows somebody's grandma that was so affected by smell xyz that something bad happened. Big whoop. Unless it's literally chemicals that are affecting your health, or an airborne pathogen, you don't need medical attention.

      How about comments from the spouse of a US Army master sergeant (26 years, now retired) who can describe olfactory assault agents that cause "nausea and vomiting" (per TFA) so severe that the the target is disabled for days to weeks? The gastrointestinal system continues to react to anything ingested with physically debilitating spasms for days, and the sphincter and peristalsis musculatures is strained to such a degree that they can't function properly for weeks. Unless they are allowed to heal by providi

  • by Dripdry (1062282) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @01:26PM (#27941285) Journal
    Toys in the Attic: "So what was the real lesson? Don't leave things in the fridge."
  • Apparantly (Score:3, Funny)

    by Chlorine Trifluoride (1517149) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @01:26PM (#27941287)
    They forgot to clean out the fridge at the Michael Scott Paper Company.
  • Chemistry lab (Score:5, Interesting)

    by stillnotelf (1476907) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @01:27PM (#27941295)
    I've worked in a chemistry lab that shared space with a lab using some really noxious amine compounds (cadaverine is named that way for a reason...). Mostly they weren't hospital-toxic, just nasty. Whenever they had to open their fridge we cleared out of the room for 10 minutes to let the fumes dissipate up the venting hoods.
    • Re:Chemistry lab (Score:5, Interesting)

      by smellsofbikes (890263) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @02:20PM (#27942169) Journal

      Be glad you weren't working next to an intense lachrymator like some of the ethyne derivatives. It's amazing to watch someone open a container in a fume hood and within ten seconds everyone in the lab is running for the door with tears streaming down their faces (and retching.)

      A terminal diamine only one carbon off cadaverine is named putrescine. It's also pretty nasty. Even purified butyric acid is astoundingly horrible stuff: years later, even a whiff of slightly rancid butter (from which name butyric acid derives) makes my stomach turn.

  • I hear you can be arrested for taking pictures of an open 'fridge's innards. ;-)

    =Smidge=

  • by RedShirtsDieFirst (1549159) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @01:28PM (#27941325)
    Did they find Indy inside?
  • by SnarfQuest (469614) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @01:29PM (#27941331)

    If you can't tell what something is through the plastic wrapper due to strange color or texture, then don't open it! Nothing good ever came out of one of these packages.

    • by 93,000 (150453) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @01:35PM (#27941425)

      Likewise, when someone says 'Hey, smell this,' never, NEVER do it. It will not end well.

      That's the first rule I taught my children. Then I moved on to that talking to strangers thing.

    • Re:The main rule (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Chabo (880571) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @01:38PM (#27941481) Homepage Journal

      My last employer was decently small (~100 people), and there were strict rules to try to prevent this problem:

      If it has no name, throw it out, even if it's not yours.
      If it has a name but no date, ask the person about it, and throw it out if they don't say "keep it". If they tell you they'll take care of it, don't believe them.
      If it has a name and an old date, ask the person about it, and be prepared to throw it out.
      Every month or so, send out an e-mail saying "Everything in the fridge gets thrown out by the end of the day.", and then do it.

      My current employer is a larger company, and just has a policy of emptying all fridges at the end of every week.

      • Re:The main rule (Score:5, Interesting)

        by mmkkbb (816035) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @01:49PM (#27941693) Homepage Journal

        I worked for a company that built label printers. They conveniently placed an automatic label printer at every fridge. You pressed a button, and a label would print out with an expiration date. Anything past expiration or without a label was tossed daily.

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by shogun (657)

          I worked for a company that built label printers. They conveniently placed an automatic label printer at every fridge. You pressed a button, and a label would print out with an expiration date. Anything past expiration or without a label was tossed daily.

          How did the printer know what the expiry date should be? Or was it always just one week hence or the like?

      • by stefanlasiewski (63134) <slashdot&stefanco,com> on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @02:27PM (#27942273) Homepage Journal

        If it has a name but no date, LEAVE IT ON THEIR DESK ON FRIDAY at 5:00PM.

        If it has a name and an old date, LEAVE IT ON THEIR DESK ON FRIDAY at 5:00PM.

        Every month or so, check if anyone is on a 3 week vacation, then send out an e-mail saying "Everything in the fridge gets LEFT ON THE VACATIONERS DESK", and then do it.

  • by Gat0r30y (957941) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @01:32PM (#27941363) Homepage Journal

    28 people to need treatment for vomiting and nausea.

    There is no justice.

    Authorities said the worker who cleaned the fridge didn't need treatment â" she can't smell because of allergies.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by geekoid (135745)

      Sounds like 28 people made shit up to go home early and take a couple of days.

  • I have just finish cleaning my fridge, no kidding! Creepy.
  • ...I don't know what it is.
    Food I can't recogni-i-ize...

  • by Anonymous Coward
    That was my lunch you assholes. I was saving that......
    • That was my lunch you assholes. I was saving that......

      "Someone has disposed of all our blue, furry food!"

  • There's always some bozo who has to go and throw away my lunch. Who are they to judge the malodoressness of my victuals??
  • Aha! (Score:2, Funny)

    by AngryK9 (1553903)
    So it's true. AT&T really does stink.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    If someone opened my fridge right now....I'd be charged with chemical or biological warfare...it's horrendous.

    The lower compartments I haven't opened in several months and I know whatever is growing down there is alive...

    Food goes to its grave in my fridge.

  • by Root Down (208740) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @01:38PM (#27941479) Homepage

    Note that if you read the sentence carefully, there is nothing that said the fridge itself was the cause of the odor!

    "AN OFFICE WORKER cleaning a fridge full of rotten food CREATED A SMELL so noxious that it sent seven co-workers to the hospital..."

    I'm pretty sure every office has one of those guys...

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Migraineman (632203)
      About a decade ago, I worked with a Vietnamese guy. His very-traditional Vietnamese wife would prepare his lunch for him every day. Wednesdays were ... the dreaded "dead fish" sandwich. Folks learned to avoid the beak room, as he would put this fish-goop sandwich into the microwave and ... OH GOD, THE HORRID STENCH ! I'M HAVING A FLASHBACK !!! KILL ME NOW.

      I don't know what it was, but it had the power to clear the second-floor break room in about 30 seconds.
  • by bughunter (10093) <.ten.knilhtrae. .ta. .retnuhgub.> on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @01:39PM (#27941491) Journal
    For a second, I thought it was Friday on Slashdot.
  • by AB3A (192265) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @01:40PM (#27941515) Homepage Journal

    --of course I have job sites on sewer pumping stations and waste-water treatment plants.

    Not only does it smell bad where I work, but it can kill you if you're not careful. People dump all sorts of things down the drain that they shouldn't. I've heard stories of entire tanker loads of gasoline getting dumped, Ether, Perc [epa.gov], Jet fuel, and some mysterious stuff that glowed blue coming from what used to be called the National Bureau of Standards (now NIST).

    During large thunderstorms, the sewer pipes often see huge flows that scour all the grease that people dump down the drain (DON'T DUMP GREASE DOWN THE DRAIN!) in to large globs the size of beach balls. These tend to block flow at the waste-water stations and cause sewer backup until someone can get down there and pitch-fork it apart.

    And Mike Rowe thinks HE does dirty jobs...

    • by Muad'Dave (255648) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @01:49PM (#27941681) Homepage
      Submit it to discovery.com/dirtyjobs - you might be famous!
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by AB3A (192265)

        The hard part is getting him there exactly when we have the first few thunderstorms of the season. That's when most of the grease from the previous fall and winter gets scoured from the pipe walls.

    • by smellsofbikes (890263) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @02:24PM (#27942237) Journal

      >During large thunderstorms, the sewer pipes often see huge flows that scour all the grease that people dump down the drain (DON'T DUMP GREASE DOWN THE DRAIN!) in to large globs the size of beach balls. These tend to block flow at the waste-water stations and cause sewer backup

      There's an easy solution to this problem: start dumping chips of plutonium down the all the drains. Whenever there's a stop-up, they'll collect in a mass and that'll fix the blockage.

      You may observe that there are some collateral problems with dumping lots of plutonium down the drain. I have an answer for that, too: we train gorillas to go into the sewers and collect all the plutonium chips that haven't been used. Then once winter comes...

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by AB3A (192265)

        Radioactive Gorillas? That's almost as good as Sharks with Frickin' lasers!

  • by InfoHighwayRoadkill (454730) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @01:46PM (#27941645) Homepage

    My brother used to work in an office that was (badly) converted from an old bakery about 10 years previously. There was the usual large store/junk room around the back where stuff was just piled up until they ran out of room. Eventually they had to clear it out. Right at the back of the room buried under a huge pile of stuff was quite a large chest freezer. It wasn't turned on but it was locked shut.

    They tried to shift it but it was too heavy and obviously full. This should have rung a few alarm bells but no. They busted the lock open with a crow bar and opened it up. Projectile vomiting all round the moment the lid was opened. 3 people taken to hospital. It required a very specialised hazmat / cleaning team to sort it out in the long term as it turned out the freezer had been used to store raw meat for pies and pasties and that meat had been in there for about 11 years or so. Did I mention the room got very hot in the summer...

    • I had a similar experience when one of my kids unplugged the deep freeze where we'd stored a quarter hog that we'd gotten as a present, and no one noticed for about 6 months. One day I wondered why there were so many flies around the back of the garage, opened the deep freeze, and instantly puked. It wasn't a matter of "being tough" or "strong stomached"; something raced from my olfactory nerves to the ancient, reptilian part of my brain which immediately issued the "purge upper GI tract" interrupt.

      It was horrible. I ended up painting my nose and upper lip with Vick's Vapor Rub, tying two bandanas and a sweatshirt around my face, and shoveling out the re-frozen pigslush with a snowshovel. Neighbors from down the block were coming outside to find the cause of the stench.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by catmistake (814204)

        It wasn't a matter of "being tough" or "strong stomached"; something raced from my olfactory nerves to the ancient, reptilian part of my brain which immediately issued the "purge upper GI tract" interrupt.

        awesome story... and told well, but...

        and shoveling out the re-frozen pigslush with a snowshovel.

        why would you do that? Did you keep the deepfreeze? God, man, why?

        • why would you do that? Did you keep the deepfreeze? God, man, why?

          Well, a younger and more naive me thought that I could just blast it out with a powerwasher. For those contemplating similar projects: give up. Seriously. It can't be done. If my wife and I can't scrub something clean, it's uncleanable.

          Thinks tried and abandoned:

          • Bleach (by the gallon)
          • The power washer
          • Comet
          • Brillo pads
          • Pounds of baking soda
          • Pounds of activated charcoal
          • Replacing the seals
          • Disassembly, cleaning, and reassembly

          We eventually resorted to selling it to my cheap friend Curtis. There's nothing he won't tolerate for a bargain.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by andyring (100627)

      Wusses....

      I went to New Orleans four times after Katrina doing relief work/cleanup. Same thing there, people's home fridges that had been obviously without power for months, were full of food and of course had been under water as well. We'd wrap them in duct tape, put it on a dolly and work them out to the curb, all the while the duct tape isn't holding and the contents are pouring all over our Tyvek suits.

      Granted, we had N95 masks, but those don't filter smells, just the mold and such. Sure, the smell w

  • by Qbertino (265505) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @01:47PM (#27941657)

    "Throwed up all over monitor."

    Thanks.

  • by azav (469988) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @01:55PM (#27941781) Homepage Journal

    I used to stock thermoses with rancid milk to clear out class at Catholic school. Just let them sit in the back of the class locker for 3 months and pop one when you need one less Religion class to deal with in your life.

  • What no Dirk? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by gmerideth (107286) <<moc.jnlcu> <ta> <htediremg>> on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @02:11PM (#27942021) Homepage

    I figured I would have been a Dirk Gently comment in here at some point. Something about a lurking refrigerator springing forth a Guilt God...

  • by cmowire (254489) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @02:21PM (#27942193) Homepage

    That's totally something for one's resume. It's a mark of distinction.

    I can picture it now:

    AT&T Research, San Jose (1999-2010)
      * Made things suck less
      * Shuffled papers
      * Almost got killed by rotten office fridge.

  • by thue (121682) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @02:41PM (#27942543) Homepage

    Has nobody else read Douglas Adams' The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul [wikipedia.org]? Don't mess with the god of guild living in the fridge...

  • by snspdaarf (1314399) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @02:53PM (#27942737)

    When I was in college, someone left a fridge on the third floor of the fraternity house with leftover pizza, a watermelon, and about a quart of turkey chili in it over the summer. Someone else, possessed by his own moral righteousness, or because he was a dick, unplugged it. About three weeks later, we had a plague of flies. I found the fridge in a pool of black spooge with maggots in the carpet.

    On discovering the fridge would fit through the window, I chained the ol' Jeep to the dumpster and drug it under the window. We then shoved the fridge, on it's back, out the window.

    And missed the dumpster

    The fridge struck an electrical box on the outside wall, and flipped, which caused it to hit the side of the dumpster, burst open, and land in our parking lot.

    Nobody went to the hospital, but it took days to get the smell off our hands.

  • by californication (1145791) on Wednesday May 13, 2009 @03:19PM (#27943153)
    At my office, you are banned from heating up fish in the microwave because of the smell. I don't mind the smell, but the people who do complained loud enough that an email was sent out stating that you could no longer heat it up in the microwave. I wish they would send out an email stating that you could no longer fart in your cubicle. The lady in the cube next to me rips some pretty nasty ones, and I'd take the smell of fish over the smell of an SBD any day.

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