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The Informant Is Back At Work 155

Posted by kdawson
from the supermarket-to-the-world dept.
theodp writes "Fortune catches up with former ADM exec and whistleblower Mark Whitacre, who talks about watching his life on screen in the dark comedy, The Informant!. Among other things, Whitacre apologizes to Fortune for duping the magazine in a 1995 interview when his bipolar-fueled compulsive lying was in its full glory. Thanks to a Ph.D. he earned from Cornell in nutritional biochemistry, and an understanding CEO who was involved in prison ministry, Whitacre is now COO of Cypress Systems, where he's been working since spending nine years in prison for embezzlement. And yes, his wife really did stand by him through the wild ride."
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The Informant Is Back At Work

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  • by Trepidity (597) <(gro.hsikcah) (ta) (todhsals-muiriled)> on Sunday September 27, 2009 @08:59PM (#29561525)

    Glad to see that someone who stole $9 million is able to once again serve as a corporate executive.

    • well.. the system works from THEIR point of view. What more do you want?

    • by Anpheus (908711)

      11.5 million. Wait, err... ;)

    • Your point? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by bazald (886779) <bazald@NOsPaM.zenipex.com> on Sunday September 27, 2009 @09:15PM (#29561611) Homepage

      He helped the FBI to expose the price-fixing scheme of his company and served his time. Assuming someone is inspecting his work, what more do you want from the guy?

      • Re: (Score:1, Flamebait)

        He helped the FBI to expose the price-fixing scheme of his company and served his time. Assuming someone is inspecting his work, what more do you want from the guy?

        I'd like to know why he was in prison if he was so benevolent to the FBI and so harmful to the evil-doers in his company. Most criminals only tend to become remorseful after they've been caught. I'd also like to know how he could afford to get a Phd. I'd also like to know how he could have gotten job references from the company that he squealed about. I've got dozens of other unanswered questions.

        • by dave_d (22165)

          Well some of your questions could easily be answered - have you read the book/seen the movie/listened to the This American Life show? The TAL goes in pretty good detail about how he ended up in prison - haven't read the book/seen the movie, but based on what I've heard of both, the events are detailed there too..

          • by skine (1524819)

            I can't be bothered to even RTFA. How do you expect me to watch movies or watch television?

        • I'd like to know why he was in prison if he was so benevolent to the FBI and so harmful to the evil-doers in his company.

          He didn't come clean right away with the feds, and when he did he put their entire multi year investigation at stake since he would of been the lone witness as to the date/time and people in the recordings. He also starting going a little crazy when his lawyer suggested he take a 2 year plea bargain. Started thinking everyone was out to get him, and he leveled some pretty wild accusations against one of the feds he workedc closely with during the investigation.

          In the end they got one of the Japanese guys

        • by nomadic (141991)
          I'd like to know why he was in prison if he was so benevolent to the FBI and so harmful to the evil-doers in his company.

          Because in addition to helping the FBI, he was also committing crimes.

          I'd also like to know how he could afford to get a Phd.

          That question doesn't make any sense. I would assume he did it the same way most PhD students pay for it, through a combination of grants, work, maybe savings...I don't know. Why are you even asking this? Are you under the impression he got it while in p
      • Re: (Score:1, Troll)

        by syousef (465911)

        He helped the FBI to expose the price-fixing scheme of his company and served his time. Assuming someone is inspecting his work, what more do you want from the guy?

        Maybe repay the people he ripped off? I know. Completely unreasonable isn't it.

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by interkin3tic (1469267)

          Maybe repay the people he ripped off? I know. Completely unreasonable isn't it.

          I say start pestering him for that 9 million right after ADM pays the taxpayers back their billions and billions of dollars. [wikipedia.org]

          ...and no, the fact that what Whitacre did was against the laws but what ADM is doing isn't really doesn't matter much to me.

      • by Tumbleweed (3706)

        He helped the FBI to expose the price-fixing scheme of his company and served his time. Assuming someone is inspecting his work, what more do you want from the guy?

        A better movie about his story?

        Just joking - I haven't seen it, and Soderbergh is a cinematic god.

        • by Darinbob (1142669)
          I haven't seen it, but I listed to the public radio story that interviewed him and some FBI agents (This American Life). It was one of those "you just can't make this stuff up" kind of story.
      • by Xest (935314)

        I'll admit I don't know the details of this case or US laws particularly well, but in general investigation into people like him, his arrest, and the court case, as well as the prison sentence cost money. A lot of money. Money that wont be repaid by anyone other than the tax payer. So it's not unreasonable for the tax paying public to somewhat appalled if someone is making an absolute fortune based on his contacts in a similar important position of trust in which he will be making a fortune.

        Fair enough, you

    • I guess they really have managed to get the prison system to be more about "reforming" inmates, as opposed to simply "incarcerating" them. He goes from being a convicted (for of all things..embezzlement) felon, to Chief "Operating" Officer. Almost makes me want to get busted for assault with a deadly weapon, extortion, and sodomy. Then I could be "reformed" into "CEO"-material!

      -Oz
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      Glad to see that someone who stole $9 million is able to once again serve as a corporate executive.

      Well, he's an executive at a small company that sells selenium as a treatment for cancer, which is a treatment of very dubious efficiacy. ("dubious" in that the actual clinical trials didn't show any improvement.)

    • by mkell85 (1387519)
      Wait..... I thought it was $11 million. Was it $9 million or $11 million Mark?
    • by Coda A27 (704451) on Sunday September 27, 2009 @09:35PM (#29561725)

      Glad to see that someone who stole $9 million is able to once again serve as a corporate executive.

      He served eight years in prison and, after finishing his sentence, found gainful employment with an open-minded employer with the skillset he possesses. I don't see anything wrong with that.

      • by palegray.net (1195047) <philip.paradis@p ... t ['ay.' in gap]> on Sunday September 27, 2009 @09:40PM (#29561757) Homepage Journal
        There isn't anything wrong with that. The man served his time, and he's a productive member of society again. The comments for this story are, unfortunately, going to be spearheaded by individuals who don't have the talents to serve as an effective executive in the first place. Thus, we get to read a hundred different spins on the "but he committed a crime" theme, all fueled by basic jealousy. Interestingly, this is the same crowd that seems to have no problem celebrating Kevin Mitnick's turnaround and subsequent success.
        • Re: (Score:1, Troll)

          by timeOday (582209)
          You are projecting your envy of rich people, whom you consider superior to yourself, onto others. Some people think our system is flawed because reaching the top requires a callous disregard for others. Even if you don't seriously consider the idea of them being right, you should at least seriously consider the idea that people who say this genuinely believe it.
          • You are projecting your envy of rich people, whom you consider superior to yourself, onto others.

            That would be an interesting point, if it had any validity to it whatsoever. Did you somehow miss the entire point of my post? Envy (or jealousy) of "rich people" is absurd. I earn a healthy salary, and I'm quite comfortable with my station in life.

        • by Trepidity (597)

          This man clearly did not have "the talents to serve as an effective executive in the first place" either, since one of the very basic skills required in order to serve effectively in that position is not stealing from your company. His performance in his position was worse than leaving the position empty.

          • Did you even bother to read the available information on the man's history (perhaps starting with the article)? Had you investigated the matter properly and applied a little critical thinking, I sincerely doubt your reply would have been the same.
          • by Darinbob (1142669)
            He was also stealing from thieves in some sense. Ie, his company was doing something highly illegal, and he was helping the FBI investigate that. Along the way he decided to steal some for himself too. What may make him unqualified as a CEO though is that he wasn't very good at stealing.
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by timmarhy (659436)
          kiven's situation is vastly different.

          this guy STOLE 11.5 million from his employer, then went on to accuse the FBI of all kinds of bullshit. he's a border line nut job as well as a rotten theif.

          kevin on the other hand never stole a cent from anyone, just hacked a bunch of company's system to see how they worked. his only crime was making them and the FBI look like idiots.

        • by cawpin (875453)

          Interestingly, this is the same crowd that seems to have no problem celebrating Kevin Mitnick's turnaround and subsequent success.

          You seem to be forgetting that Mitnick never actually broke any laws. He also never had any nefarious intentions, unlike this guy. Personally, I think time served is time served and he should be left alone, as long as he returned the money.

        • by mama1two (1645659)

          Famous over night

          it took time for anyone to realize that he was a liar and a snitch.
          Seen an interview and mark seemed more happy that he was known than being out of prison

        • The man served his time, and he's a productive member of society again.

          Since this logic does not apply to sex offenders, why should it apply to anyone else?

        • by V!NCENT (1105021)

          Interestingly, this is the same crowd that seems to have no problem celebrating Kevin Mitnick's turnaround and subsequent success.

          Which leads me to the conclusion that you conclusions about other people appear to be the wrong conclusions...

          I liked the part where the OP tried to be a smartass.

        • by dkleinsc (563838)

          don't have the talents to serve as an effective executive in the first place

          You're absolutely right: I lack the "talent" to ruin people's careers, casually rip off customers, embezzle, not give a rat's behind about anyone but myself, and deny reality whenever that reality would be bad for me. Yes, there are executives who don't engage in that sort of behavior, but far more that do (especially at larger firms like ADM).

          • Yes, there are executives who don't engage in that sort of behavior, but far more that do (especially at larger firms like ADM).

            Please present hard evidence to back that claim up. While some executives are certainly bad apples, they are most assuredly in the minority. I'm not getting the sense that you have much experience in this matter.

            • There are a number of sources [imdb.com] of evidence [amazon.com] that many top executives today have little scruples and perhaps less intelligence.

              You don't think the recent worldwide financial collapse began from the bottom up do you?
              • The worldwide financial collapse had a lot to do with a large number of idiots deciding to buy homes they knew they couldn't afford, which is pretty much an extension of the widespread practice of running credit cards up to ridiculous levels. Unemployment sure hurts a lot more if you've got $40K in unsecured debt. That's pretty much the definition of "from the bottom up." Personal responsibility is sorely lacking in society these days.

                Again, you've failed to prove your point. Exactly how many executives
                • by dkleinsc (563838)

                  The worldwide financial collapse had a lot to do with a large number of idiots deciding to buy homes they knew they couldn't afford

                  Most of the people buying the homes they couldn't afford didn't know they couldn't afford them. In fact, their mortgage broker almost definitely told them they could afford those homes, because the mortgage broker would collect a commission if the buyer could afford the home, and wouldn't if the buyer couldn't. A responsible banker, by contrast, would never have given these folks loans and would have made sure to explain that the home they wanted could not be reasonably purchased with the income and savings

                  • Where, exactly, is the personal responsibility in your version of the events that led up to the housing collapse? Reference my earlier post refuting your view [slashdot.org].

                    Ignorance is absolutely no excuse. People simply didn't read the papers they were signing, and if they did and didn't understand the terms, weren't responsible enough to get independent advice on the matter. There was a time when no sane person would buy a home or make any other large investment without consulting numerous people for assurances; th
                    • by dkleinsc (563838)

                      Ignorance is absolutely no excuse.

                      Why not?

                      Assume you were born poor. With a single parent who was so busy working she rarely had time to teach you anything. Your education consisted of Sesame Street and similar television before you were 5, and inner-city public school after that. You probably get fair-to-middling grades in school, somewhere in the B-C range, and graduate from a voc tech high school specializing in cooking (putting you ahead of a significant percentage of your peers).

                      Where in that education did you learn anything about inte

                • by Darinbob (1142669)
                  If these are "idiots" then it's completely plausible that they did not know they couldn't afford the homes. Getting a mortgage is a complex thing, and many people just want to know "how much to I pay every month?" If they get a monthly figure that seems affordable, then they think the entire thing is affordable, blissfully unaware of time bombs. Doesn't help if the mortgage seller is acting like a used car salesperson and hand-waving away any "but what if..." questions.

                  Actually I think most of these peop
                  • if only the financial world's fantasy that the housing market can only go up had been true

                    This much is true, but the underlying factors have a lot more to do with people being idiots in a "gotta have it all" sense, as opposed to possessing the basic intelligence required to understand the risk. In other words, these people might have been idiots, but they weren't stupid. Folks used to be raised with a completely different attitude toward money. I'm only 28, but my parents and grandparents taught me differently.

                    Anyone who believes any market can "only go up" has it coming, so to speak. At the

      • criminal - - officer - - criminal - - officer - - criminal - - officer

        I don't know. It just doesn't have the proper ring. Let's try again.

        felon - - officer - - felon - - officer - - felon - - officer

        Maybe it's just me, but I can't get it to sound right. Maybe we should get West Point and Annapolis to start recruiting from Sing Sing, and see how it works. Maybe in the future, maybe the military can hold courts martial, and sentence the convicted to serving as officers.

      • He served eight years in prison and, after finishing his sentence, found gainful employment with an open-minded employer with the skillset he possesses. I don't see anything wrong with that.

        Interesting how people (almost) always label me as socially dysfunctional because I don't lie (or cheat and steal). Interesting also how people don't think that there is anything wrong with a person who abuses his position of authority and profits from that abuse and is later rewarded with a job, and people like you claim there is nothing wrong. I've been turned down jobs because I didn't have any good references. Employers don't like me because I tend to want to follow the rules (in a chemical plant I work

        • by jdpars (1480913)
          You're really building yourself up to be this honorable but persecuted person, but you're really not. You've created an excessive moral code that is outside social norms just like someone who could never tell the truth. The inability to function well in society is just as morally wrong as telling small lies. While I thank you for not dumping chemicals down the drain, there is certainly a better way to respond than "No, I won't do it." Perhaps, "This is not SOP. We're going to do it the right way." And then
          • So far most of the replies to my comments are people making things up about me like this;

            You're really building yourself up to be this honorable but persecuted person, but you're really not.

            I never claimed to be honourable, not here nor in the workforce. I figured here (on Slashdot) some people may appreciate my comments (in the workforce I've learned to keep quiet except to say "I agree", and "yes boss" and "how high"). I have never claimed to be persecuted either. In terms of honourable and persecuted, I remember one time in grade six many people in the class room were harassing somebody, and the teacher

        • by iiiears (987462)
          @unlametheweak Your ethos has likely brought you inner calm when others have sought narrower selfish goals of praise with little depth or true worth,They have reaped the empty wind. After all, wealth is transitory and fleeting in a lifetime one may be poor then rich then poor again. The items purchased with it worn and discarded before inner calm returns and the internal compass is only steadied after worthwhile truths are learned. Those things gained by "shortcuts" the sacrifice of love, family, communi
    • He spent NINE freakin YEARS in a prison! Ask yourself this one question: How many years of your life equal $9 million? When would you consider it being forgiven?

      To me personally, one single year of my life is worth more than those 9 million.

      Additionally, physical reality has no concept called "guilt". It's just cause and effect. So what causes made this happen? And what causes made that happen? And so on, until the beginning of all time. Should we therefore punish the big bang, because we did not look furth

    • If there was ever a comment deserving of a Troll mod, it's the parent.

      All with mod points; Read more about the guy than you have heard from the media. This is not a simple issue, with opinions to be based upon hype and paper-selling hyperbole.
  • To Be Human (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 27, 2009 @09:26PM (#29561663)
    I've lived around bipolar people my entire life. I myself suffer from moderate OCD / ADHD, so when I run into a relative or friend who is in the manic phase, it's sort of like oil and water. I'm over-cautious, and they're just three sheets to the wind, mentally speaking. I remember finally learning about bipolar when I was 21, and wondering why nobody told me to brace myself when I was around these people. But the average person, I think, didn't know much about it until very recently.

    I remember the one who broke into his high school to change his grades (almost as some sort of graduation present for a new detective on the force), the 60-year-old neocon woman who bought a very expensive car on a secretary's salary, then ditched it in a parking lot and rode cross-country with a friend to start a rock band, and the one who stopped taking his meds and switched to a "natural" cure that had him taking 40 vitamin pills every day, just to get "trace minerals" that ended up doing nothing for him but keeping him in bed all day, depressed. Or the one who submitted some INCREDIBLY Jackass-like videos to America's Funniest Videos back before Jackass was on TV. Those poor screeners must have been mortified, lol.

    On the other hand, I've had some amazing moments with bipolar people. Just being there for them when they are bummed out, when they're sleeping on the couch all day with their boss calling every half hour, or their mom calling, freaking out that they're going to commit suicide like their dad did.

    I am in awe of people who work in the mental health industry. I'm an illustrator/designer by trade, and among those who have used the services of mental health professionals are artists like Norman Rockwell, Georges Remi, Otto Preminger, etc. These are people who needed clarity and direction, among other things, just to get out of bed in the morning or start the next project.
    • Thank you for that.
    • Great comment, and you mention "I am in awe of people who work in the mental health industry". From seeing the movie and reading the article, I'm also in awe of his wife. From the article:

      "I learned my family was the most important thing in my life. My wife moved to every state I was located and came every Friday, Saturday, and Sunday for eight and a half years. Basically, Monday through Thursday I'd be waiting for Friday night, and she'd come all day Saturday and all day Sunday. And I don't mean for an h

  • Thanks to a Ph.D. he earned from Cornell in nutritional biochemistry, and an understanding CEO who was involved in prison ministry, Whitacre is now COO of Cypress Systems, where he's been working since spending nine years in prison for embezzlement.

    Another example of how references and credit checks are worthless for proving reliability. Executive class criminals are in high demand by corporations because of their untrustworthiness. The game of life is won by winners like Richard Hatch [wikipedia.org]. Winners are very rarely nice people, although they have so much money that they smile a lot, so it at least appears as if they are friendly. Winners are very positive in their demeanor.

  • Spoilers (Score:5, Funny)

    by Arakageeta (671142) on Sunday September 27, 2009 @09:38PM (#29561743)

    Gee, thanks for the spoilers!

    • by Kozz (7764)

      Gee, thanks for the spoilers!

      That reminds me, I'd like to tell you about some other great movies I've seen, including The Passion of the Christ, Titanic, The Usual Suspects and The Sixth Sense.

      • Huh? Two of those four are hardly "spoiler-able" movies, while the other two are quite spoile-able.

      • That reminds me, I'd like to tell you about some other great movies I've seen, including The Passion of the Christ, Titanic, The Usual Suspects and The Sixth Sense.

        Jesus dies, check. The ship sinks, check. Common history stuff most people know.

        The Usual Suspects though? Sixth Sense? Did you really already know the endings to those?

        Just sayin'.

      • by pregister (443318)

        I see Verbal Kint (aka Keyser Soze) nailed to a cross which is sinking to the bottom of the ocean and about to become a dead person?

      • Guys guys (reffering to sibling comments)! You misunderstood this. He knows very well that two of those are the one side of the spoiler-able extreme, and the other two are the other extreme. That was kinda his point.

        So WHOOOSHHH to all of you! :D

        ___
        P.S.: No, I don't drive a Prius. Why?

      • I've never heard this guy's story before (being from the UK) and was actually looking forward to seeing this film. Now slashdot has managed to give the entire thing away. Thanks.
  • by Kozz (7764) on Sunday September 27, 2009 @09:42PM (#29561771)

    It's really a fascinating story. A full nine years before the film was created, Ira Glass and crew at This American Life did a podcast on the event. Have a listen. http://www.thislife.org/Radio_Episode.aspx?episode=168 [thislife.org]

    • Re: (Score:2, Troll)

      Amazing that there were podcasts NINE years ago.
      • by MBCook (132727)

        There weren't, at least not This American Life. They've had their podcast for a while now, although it was available from Audible before that.

        They just re-aired the episode last week (due the to movie, as Kozz said), so it's available for free right now. It was a really great story.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      I second listening to the podcast. It's a wonderful piece of storytelling and the stainless steel set this guy had blew my mind. Granted he was bipolar, but what he did was exceptional.

      I want to see the movie because of the podcast. It's that good.
    • by Joe Snipe (224958)

      Not for nothing, but movies take a long time to make. I'm sure the buzz for this movie was around in 2000, hell I'm sure the script was around then. Iyour goal was to suggest that Mr glass had some sort of edge on anyone you are surely mistaken, after all these things don't happen in a vacuum.

  • The guy is and has always been a compulsive liar and he is still getting an executive job on his way out of prison.

    Makes you think, doesn't it.

    • The guy is and has always been a compulsive liar and he is still getting an executive job on his way out of prison.

      Makes you think, doesn't it.

      For me, the much more thought provoking bit is that he first managed to get his PhD in biochemistry. In contrast to executives, I don't normally think of chemists as being greedy unethical liars

      • by nomadic (141991)
        For me, the much more thought provoking bit is that he first managed to get his PhD in biochemistry. In contrast to executives, I don't normally think of chemists as being greedy unethical liars

        There are many, many executives with PhDs, especially in the agricultural and pharmaceutical industries. Being a scientist doesn't put you on some higher moral ground.
        • Obviously not, I just said I don't normally THINK of them as being greedy unethical liars. Not anything about scientists and moral ground. Now that you mention it though, I would still trust my tax money more with a researcher at a university than an executive of a major international company.

    • Agree completely!

      However, my way of wording it is "The guy was suffering from bipolar disorder, causing him to latch onto any and all means of proving self worth at the expense of everything else. He was found out, put in prison, rehabilitated, and is now more in control of his neurological condition. He has found gainful employment by an employer who understands the issues fuelling his past behaviour, and has decided that the man's skillset is worth more than the risk (or the safeguards against) a repeat
      • His main skillset obviously being lying through his teeth about a product that doesn't actually work.

        Truly a fantastic example of rehabilitation in the corporate world of today!

  • When I read the book a few years ago, the most striking thing was that the names Archer Daniels Midland and Dwayne Andreas didn't appear on the cover or liner notes, and I actually had to look pretty deep in the book to figure out what company he worked for.

    Now that ADM pleaded guilty and paid a $100 million fine, their lawyers have less to work with, but at the time the publisher was apparently pretty scared of them. The book is also exceedingly careful about alleging that the Andreases knew how their com

  • Missing Piece (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Killer Napkin (221026) on Sunday September 27, 2009 @10:44PM (#29562095)

    A lot of people wonder about the strange events in the life of Mark Whitacre. As I was reading through the Fortune article, I immediately noticed the fingerprints of the life of a Christian. So I looked it up and it seems that Christianity played a huge role in the story of Mark Whitacre. Obviously, you can't put that in modern films, but he covers it in other sources and talks freely about it in numerous interviews. You can Google and find plenty of references. I thought I'd mention it, not just because I'm a Christian, but because it answers a lot of questions: his claim that his wife was his "moral compass", why she didn't leave him, and his contrite apology at the end of the interview. I suspect it also has much to do with the CEO who was involved in "prison ministry" that later hired him up at Cypress.

    See? We're not all anti-evolutionist, racist, hate-mongers.* :-)

    * Some of us are just ex-conartist/embezzlers :-)

    • by bendodge (998616)

      You are correct. WORLD Magazine had a good writeup on him. http://www.worldmag.com/articles/15856 [worldmag.com] (It's likely behind a paywall.)

    • A lot of people wonder about the strange events in the life of Mark Whitacre. As I was reading through the Fortune article, I immediately noticed the fingerprints of the life of a Christian.

      Okay, so this risks starting a flamewar, but what the heck...

      Regarding the characteristics you noticed that made you think, "this guy's a Christian". Do some persons from other religions show such transformations as well?

      And if not, then how narrowly must one slice the definition of "Christian" in order to get the cluster of people having what you referred to as "fingerprints"? I.e., Protestants vs. non-Protestants? Are Mormons or Jehovah's Witnesses in or out?

      I'm asking because I've heard various Christ

      • It's terminology, and behavior which make up the "fingerprint." It's not so much that only Christianity can cause a significant change, but that when it is Christianity there are identifiable signs.

        I don't know if all religions do this. I do know that Mormons likewise have their own unique phrases and behaviors which come about after they change, which are distinctly different than Chrisitans. Alcoholics Anonymous, though not a religious institution per se, also has a signature.

        (Forgive any poor spelli
    • by dkleinsc (563838)

      Obviously, you can't put that in modern films

      Sure you can. They might not all be big Hollywood blockbusters, but to say that religion is necessarily disqualified from film is incorrect. For instance, Stanley Kubrick, hardly a Christian-oriented filmmaker, made Christianity a key part of the film A Clockwork Orange. And films about biblical events are regularly quite popular and successful, whether we're talking about The Passion of the Christ or Prince of Egypt.

      I'm not exactly sure though that Mark Whitacre's Christianity would be one I'd take for ins

    • by elrous0 (869638) *
      You should be grateful they didn't include it. If this is the kind of self-serving scumbag your religion produces, I wouldn't go around advertising it.
    • by gad_zuki! (70830)

      >See? We're not all anti-evolutionist

      Actually, if you watch the movie you'll find him make random comments about animals that shows an incredible lack of a basic understanding of natural selection. Im not sure where they came from (made up by the filmmaker, his own writings, his conversations, etc) but its interesting to see that Mr. Moral Middle American Christian is a really just a mentally-ill thief with no understanding of evolution.

      Personally, I dont think he's really all that crazy, perhaps mild bi

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by PPalmgren (1009823)
      Kind of off-topic, but one late night I was up watching boring TV and saw some awful hour-long show soleley trying to argue that the founding fathers of the US were Christian. I couldn't turn it off because it seemed so bizzare to me that someone would talk for an hour over something so pointless. I get the same vibe from your post. Why does it matter if someone is a Christian or not? I don't understand the logic of even bringing something up like this, since I see zero causation between his religion an
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by jeffasselin (566598)

        It matters to me. Someone who is clearly Christian automatically loses much credibility with me. If he's willing to believe there's some invisible guy listening when he mumbles to himself, what other absurdities is he going to be ready to believe?

  • He did his time, he should be allowed to go back to work.
  • The guy looks so much like Matt Damon it's creepy.

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