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Wal-Mart Jumps Into Video Streaming 150

Posted by Soulskill
from the timing-is-everything dept.
Endoflow2010 writes "Today Wal-Mart has added streaming video to their website. What better time to compete with Netflix, now that they have raised their prices? On Wal-Mart's website, the movies will be available the same day the DVDs go on sale in stores. Walmart.com general manager Steve Nave said the retailer is following its customers as they increasingly embrace digital movie rentals and purchases. 'We know customers are starting to shift their behavior, in terms of how they consume their media,' Nave said, adding, 'As as customers make that change, we don't want to lose that customer as they shift to digital.' Wal-Mart, long the nation's leading seller of DVDs, signaled its intent to double down on digital movie distribution in February 2010, when it spent a reported $100 million to acquire Vudu, a Silicon Valley start-up that was gradually being added to home entertainment devices."
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Wal-Mart Jumps Into Video Streaming

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  • Great Idea (Score:5, Funny)

    by Sloppy (14984) on Tuesday July 26, 2011 @07:52PM (#36889700) Homepage Journal

    Bandwidth caps should be taken away during those times when usage is low, similar to cell phone plans with free unlimited nights and weekends. Then you could schedule your movie downloads for the wee hours and watch them the next day.

    That is just too fucking awesome: people want to time-shift streaming to make it cheaper, more efficient, and less painfully laggy. Don't get me wrong: it is a good idea. I sincerely like it. Who wants to stream when the network is at its busiest?

    Then, next, all you need to do is have multiple recipients for each stream (no problem getting people to synchronous their receipt, since they're time-shifting anyway; this is a job for a computer!), so that you can reap the advantages of broadcast or multicast. For a popular TV show with n viewers, this would lead an an up-to-n-fold increase in efficiency on some segments of the network. For large values of n that is truly a no-brainer.

    And then you will have invented something new and patent worthy. Call it "cable television combined with DVR." It would be awesome tech, similar to what people will be using in the year 2000.

  • by 93 Escort Wagon (326346) on Tuesday July 26, 2011 @07:54PM (#36889714)

    Newsflash: DVDs are digital, have been since they came out.

    Please stop calling each new wave of technology "switching to digital" -- practically everything is digital already; I know it's hard, but you'll just have to bite the bullet and get half a clue what you're talking about so you can describe it. In this particular case, "internet", "on-line", "streaming", and/or "not a big truck" may be useful.

    Over the past few weeks I'd grown concerned that some horrific accident had decimated the ranks of overly-pedantic Slashdot users - I'm glad to find out you're okay!

  • Re:Useless (Score:4, Funny)

    by alostpacket (1972110) on Tuesday July 26, 2011 @10:44PM (#36890680) Homepage

    Excellent! I think they should add another layer. Say like when I know what I want to watch 2-14 Buisiness days (M-F) from now, I could tell them and they'd send it to me on some type of disc and I could watch it whenever I got it and send it back when I was done. ;)

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