Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Toys

Rubik's Cube: 40 Years Old and Never Meant To Be a Toy 105

Posted by samzenpus
from the don't-peel-the-stickers dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The greatest geek toy ever invented turns 40 today and to celebrate there's an interactive Google Doodle, and the Telegraph has a short history of the toy. 'There are only a handful of toys that last more than a generation. But the Rubik's cube, which celebrates its 40th birthday, now joins the likes of Barbie, Play-Doh, Lego and the Slinky, as one of the great survivors in the toy cupboard. What makes its success all the remarkable is that it did not start out as a toy. The Rubik's cube was invented in 1974 by Erno Rubik, a Hungarian architect, who wanted a working model to help explain three-dimensional geometry.'"
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Rubik's Cube: 40 Years Old and Never Meant To Be a Toy

Comments Filter:
  • Did it survive? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by wisnoskij (1206448) on Monday May 19, 2014 @09:08AM (#47037455) Homepage

    You used to see them everywhere, not really the case for the last decade or two.

    You cannot compare the Rubik's cube to Barbie or Play-Doh on that front.

  • Hmm (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Richy_T (111409) on Monday May 19, 2014 @10:30AM (#47038057) Homepage

    The Rubik's cube was invented in 1974 by Erno Rubik, a Hungarian architect, who wanted a working model to help explain three-dimensional geometry.

    I've heard this before but it makes no sense to me that the cube would in any way help to explain three dimensional geometry (any more than would a static cube of wood). Can anyone elucidate on this?

    Not that I'm complaining. Love to play with one myself.

  • by rossdee (243626) on Monday May 19, 2014 @11:29AM (#47038531)

    'There are only a handful of toys that last more than a generation.

    Oh, come on, there are many 'toys' that have been around for more than a century
    Like the 'stick with the horses head handle, the bicycle and tricycle, the spinning top, the soccer ball, the oval football, the bucket and spade (sandcastles) the swimming pool, the Y shaped catapult, dolls (and toy soldiers for boys) chalk, crayons and other drawing stuff, the seesaw (aka teeter tottor) slides, playing cards (the classical 4 suits kind) dice (6 sided, not the crappy company that owns slashdot, the skipping rope, the kaleidoscope, the boomerang, model trains, cars and boats, and the box that the toys came in

We don't know one millionth of one percent about anything.

Working...