Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Sci-Fi News The 2000 Beanies

The 2014 Hugo Awards 180

Posted by Soulskill
from the congratulations-to-all dept.
Dave Knott writes: WorldCon 2014 wrapped up in London this last weekend and this year's Hugo Award winners were announced. Notable award winners include:

Best Novel: Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie
Best Novelette: "The Lady Astronaut of Mars" by Mary Robinette Kowal
Best Novella: "Equoid" by Charles Stross
Best Short Story: "The Water That Falls on You from Nowhere" by John Chu
Best Graphic Story: "Time" by Randall Munroe
Best Dramatic Presentation (Long Form): Gravity written by Alfonso Cuarón & Jonás Cuarón, directed by Alfonso Cuarón
Best Dramatic Presentation (Short Form): Game of Thrones: "The Rains of Castamere" written by David Benioff & D.B. Weiss, directed by David Nutter

The results of this year's awards were awaited with some some trepidation in the SF community, due to well-documented attempts by some controversial authors to game the voting system. These tactics appear to have been largely unsuccessful, as this is the fourth major award for the Leckie novel, which had already won the 2013 BSFA, 2013 Nebula and 2014 Clarke awards.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

The 2014 Hugo Awards

Comments Filter:
  • I am disappointed that Asimov's didn't even run this year's short story winner. I feel like Sheila was out of it for the past couple issues.

    • I met a guy who gave me a lyft ride that had submitted a story to anthology. it was about a futuristic spider queen or something like that? I forget his name.
  • Time (Score:4, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday August 21, 2014 @09:28AM (#47720375)

    This is undoubtedly the first hugo award for a graphic story featuring stick figures.

  • Novel (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Ancillary Justice has its merits but read like an first novelist's smart attempt at crossing Alistair Reynolds with Iain M. Banks. Indeed, all three can/could do with good editors to tidy the worst longeurs. There's a little too much fashion sometimes; I rate Phillip Mann's The Disestablishment of Paradise as the strongest sf novel I've read in the past year, stylistically, structurally, thematically and in its characterisation and humour; it betters the Leckie IMO but only made one of the shortlists.

    [/. Me

    • Ancillary Justice has its merits but read like an first novelist's smart attempt at crossing Alistair Reynolds with Iain M. Banks. Indeed, all three can/could do with good editors to tidy the worst longeurs. There's a little too much fashion sometimes; I rate Phillip Mann's The Disestablishment of Paradise as the strongest sf novel I've read in the past year, stylistically, structurally, thematically and in its characterisation and humour; it betters the Leckie IMO but only made one of the shortlists.

      [/. Member, AC due to travel]

      Interesting, but as an annoying sidelight that is altogether too common:

      HOWEVER!! The Kindle version which I received was full of typos, missing letters and missing words. There were enough mistakes that it passed through annoying and actually affected my ability to follow the story. To their credit the publisher contacted me directly to apologise and asked for examples of mistakes. I've provided some examples but have not heard back, nor do I know how to verify that current versions of the Kindle book have been fixed.

      I hate that. How hard is it to copy something into a machine readable format that started out in machine readable format. What do they do, running through Slashdot's filters?

      • HOWEVER!! The Kindle version which I received was full of typos, missing letters and missing words. There were enough mistakes that it passed through annoying and actually affected my ability to follow the story. To their credit the publisher contacted me directly to apologise and asked for examples of mistakes. I've provided some examples but have not heard back, nor do I know how to verify that current versions of the Kindle book have been fixed.

        I don't recall any formatting issues in the version I read.
        In the past I bought a (self published, I think) Kindle book that was poorly formatted and Amazon refunded it immediately.

    • I enjoyed Ancillary Justice and am glad Ann Leckie won, but you could tell it's a first novel. Her next novel is out in the next couple of months and will be worth a look at.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    ...it's an attempt to protest the forces of political correctness (represented by Wiscon's radical feminist faction) who are attempting to get people fired [fantasticalandrewfox.com] for not toeing the line.

  • Sad Puppy Slate (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Daetrin (576516) on Thursday August 21, 2014 @10:01AM (#47720673)
    "Largely unsuccessful" is a bit of an understatement. Those who follow such things have been rejoicing that the "Sad Puppy Slate" ended up last in all the author categories, and that the novella by Vox Day, the guy with very... questionable political and personal views, actually ended up below "No Award". I think it's interesting that despite the outcries and rage and threats about "No Awarding" the entire slate, the only nominee to actually meet such a fate was the one that almost everyone agreed was literarily a piece of garbage.

    One does have to wonder how the "Sad Puppy Slate" would have done if it hadn't weighed itself down with a nominee that was simultaneously so objectionable and so poorly written.

    http://whatever.scalzi.com/201... [scalzi.com]
    http://whatever.scalzi.com/201... [scalzi.com]
    • by halivar (535827)

      So the Hugo awards are a popularity contest.

      • Re:Sad Puppy Slate (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Daetrin (576516) on Thursday August 21, 2014 @10:30AM (#47720935)
        Yes, they are. Anyone who thinks otherwise hasn't been paying attention. The Nebula awards are a popularity contest as judged by people in the industry (authors and possibly editors and publishers as well, i forget the specifics,) while the Hugo awards are a popularity contest as judged by the public.

        In theory in both contests the popularity is supposed to be based on the quality of the work. That rule is probably more closely observed for the Nebulas than the Hugos, but in both cases it is impossible to eliminate all personal biases.

        I voted in the Hugos and personally found the Vox Day work to be junk, while the other works from the "Sad Puppy Slate" were decent, though not anything i would have considered worth nominating myself. Obviously i agree with the results, but obviously i am also biased like every other human being.

        So yes, the Hugos are a popularity contest, as are the Nebulas, the Oscars, the Grammys, and every other reward for artistic achievement that you can think of.
    • by pavon (30274)

      Thanks for posting a link that actually mostly explains the issue. Much more helpful than the summary that posted a link to a huge list of links, and of the ones I clicked, half weren't applicable to the issue, and the other half were just opinion pieces that assumed you were already familiar with the controversy. Horrible editing.

  • This is an aside to TFS, and more of a rant.

    At my local library they have folded the Sci-Fi section in with the general fiction books. Which means I can no longer browse just Sci-Fi books. I am not sure why they did it, but what irks me a bit is that the Mystery section still remain separate.

    • by Zero__Kelvin (151819) on Thursday August 21, 2014 @10:33AM (#47720963) Homepage

      "At my local library they have folded the Sci-Fi section in with the general fiction books. Which means I can no longer browse just Sci-Fi books. I am not sure why they did it, but what irks me a bit is that the Mystery section still remain separate."

      That sounds mysterious. You should investigate.

      • "At my local library they have folded the Sci-Fi section in with the general fiction books. Which means I can no longer browse just Sci-Fi books. I am not sure why they did it, but what irks me a bit is that the Mystery section still remain separate."

        That sounds mysterious. You should investigate.

        It's probably the fault of some old guy who dresses as a monster or ghost and who'll get away with it if us meddling kids don't stop him.

        I'll grab the Scooby Snacks.

  • Sad thing. After Paolo Bacigalupi won all the awards below he discovered that you make much writing SF, and now writes Young Adult novels

    The Windup Girl is a biopunk science fiction novel, written by Paolo Bacigalupi and published by Night Shade Books on September 1, 2009. The novel was named as the ninth best fiction book of 2009 by TIME magazine,[1] and as the best science fiction book of the year in the Reference and User Services Association's 2010 Reading List.[2] This book is a 2010 Nebula Award[3] a

    • It's different. Although one of the things that's a little annoying is that while he implies that a lot of the damage to the world's food supplies may be deliberate and ongoing, he never has anyone actually say that or even grumble, accuse or try and fight back. The closest approximation is where Thailand isolates itself and does internal purges.

      The kink-spring concept is original, but nobody seems to have a clue about other renewable energy sources. He apparently never saw the YouTube video where someone t

    • by M1FCJ (586251)

      YA SF/F novels are still SF/F novels. I fully approve any writer who can write good YA stuff. Just because it's for youngsters doesn't mean it has to be bad.

  • How can one properly determine the difference between a novel, a novelette and a novella?

  • I was there. Didn't bother to attend the Hugos.

    BTW. They were two ceremonies. Check out http://loncon3.org

EARTH smog | bricks AIR -- mud -- FIRE soda water | tequila WATER

Working...