Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
DEAL: For $25 - Add A Second Phone Number To Your Smartphone for life! Use promo code SLASHDOT25. Also, Slashdot's Facebook page has a chat bot now. Message it for stories and more. Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 Internet speed test! ×
Movies Television Entertainment

Netflix Will Explore Mobile-Specific Cuts of Its Original Series (theverge.com) 80

An anonymous reader shares an article: Netflix chief product officer Neil Hunt said in a briefing today with journalists in San Francisco that the company plans to explore streaming mobile-specific cuts of its original movies and TV shows, to satisfy what he said was a growing audience of mobile Netflix watchers. "It's not inconceivable that you could take a master [copy] and make a different cut for mobile," Hunt said. To date, Netflix hasn't been delivering different cuts for different viewing platforms, Hunt said, but "it's something we will explore over the next few years." The idea would be to create a version of the content with scenes or shots that are more easily visible or immersive on a mobile phone, since certain shots can be hard to see or can appear diminished on a relatively small phone screen.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Netflix Will Explore Mobile-Specific Cuts of Its Original Series

Comments Filter:
  • Do not want (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday March 16, 2017 @11:23AM (#54051085)

    Do you want to lose subscribers? Because that's how you lose subscribers.

    • by sims 2 ( 994794 )

      I hate this idea but at the same time it would be really nice if you could pick which edition of the movie you wanted to watch like the 1989 version or the 2017 remastered 1989 version or just between the rated and unrated versions.

      That and things like commentary are some of the only features i'm still looking for with netflix.

      I like watching really good movies a second time with the commentary on but I won't mess with discs and the pre-roll ads anymore for the privilege.

      Oh and keep like the last 1-10 minu

    • I think the people that object to this are going to prefer to watch on a decent sized screen.
    • Except there's no mention of it being inescapable forced onto mobile users. The sky isn't falling here.

  • Opt out option (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday March 16, 2017 @11:26AM (#54051107)

    They better have a opt out option!

  • This is a stupid idea that makes little sense. Netflix, you are not a video game, trying to cater to different platforms to make more money. Sure, getting new viewers by making it easy to use whatever platform the audience prefers, is a very intelligent and well rounded concept that has long since shown to be effective. However, this idea seems to stand in opposition to that sentiment, creating unnecessary virtual barriers to content. I shouldn't have to have a smart phone or be forced to watch content on s
    • by sims 2 ( 994794 )

      Not yet Netflix basic features are still included with the sub.
      If it were owned by EA the netflix app would be $2.99 and if you want to watch HD on mobile that would be an extra $10 "HD VIDEO DLC" in addition to the monthly subscription fee.

    • Re:Dumb.... (Score:4, Insightful)

      by DontBeAMoran ( 4843879 ) on Thursday March 16, 2017 @11:46AM (#54051271)

      I agree. Imagine if Amazon removed paragraphs from the eBook versions to make it easier/faster to read? Different cuts of TV shows and movies that depends on the viewing device is a bad idea.

      However, if all they're talking about is different cropping for smaller devices, i.e. to make it easier to see details/action/characters on the small screen, then it's not really that different from a 16:9 movie cropped to 4:3. Sure you're missing parts of the image, but it's not a different cut.

      I'm 40 and the only time I've noticed cropping removed important information was the ending scene of The Fifth Element, where you see the moon in the 16:9 version but not in the 4:3 version. The implied information was that our current moon was another evil sphere that was stopped thousands of years ago and the new now-also-dead evil sphere became a second moon. Removing that bit of information kind of ruined the ending for those who watched in 4:3.

      • by Maritz ( 1829006 )

        Imagine if Amazon removed paragraphs from the eBook versions to make it easier/faster to read?

        I believe that would have the opposite effect. Paragraphs are not designed to impede reading.

        • by WallyL ( 4154209 )

          I believe that would have the opposite effect. Paragraphs are not designed to impede reading.

          Ever read Les Misérables?

          • Then perhaps Hugo's Les Misérables might benefit from an approach akin to that of Julio Cortázar's novel Hopscotch [wikipedia.org]: the main story at the front, with the rest relegated to appendices. Readers could then choose to read the main story first or read with the appendices inserted before each related chapter.

          • Yes, my favorite chapter was the Intestine of the Leviathan... because it didn't involve any character that was part of the story but instead went about describing the sewers of Paris based off the tales from various real figures.

        • I didn't mean paragraphs as in formatting, I meant removing whole paragraphs - i.e. remove text - from pages.

      • by nasch ( 598556 )

        In Mission: Impossible, Hunt had his back to the camera and was doing his sleight of hand trick with the disc*. In 4:3 his hands were not visible so you couldn't tell what he was doing. Not that it ruined the movie or anything but probably made the scene a little more confusing for someone who hadn't seen it before.

        * he was in the safe house with Claire, Krieger and Luther after the heist

  • So are they going to consider the Roku and Amazon Fire and similar devices to be "mobile devices"? Because a lot of people use these devices to output via HDMI to their TVs. That doesn't seem right to give these users different content just because they're not using a computer as their primary output device.
    • by zifn4b ( 1040588 )

      So are they going to consider the Roku and Amazon Fire and similar devices to be "mobile devices"? Because a lot of people use these devices to output via HDMI to their TVs. That doesn't seem right to give these users different content just because they're not using a computer as their primary output device.

      If you actually RTFA, you would see the very first thing in the article is a picture of handheld devices. In the article at the very bottom it even says:

      “mobile screens are the majority consumption device.”

      "mobile screen" != HDMI output

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday March 16, 2017 @11:41AM (#54051221)

    My TV is on the other side of the room. My cell phone I hold close to my head when watching TV. Guess which fills more of my vision?

  • Make it optional and go for it. I don't mind. And separate completely making a scene visible on a mobile screen versus making it "more immersive" on a mobile device. You pop some x-ray type shit up in my face and I will cancel my account.
  • My gut feeling tells me recutting for mobile will lead to no good.
    However; how is this any different from movies cut to 4:3 a few decades ago, and (re-)cut to 16:9 somewhat more recent?

  • Out of context? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by macwhiz ( 134202 ) on Thursday March 16, 2017 @12:01PM (#54051389)

    Buried in the original article is a mention that these statements were made during a two-day event Netflix held together with Dolby Laboratories, centered around High Dynamic Range video (e.g., Dolby Vision).

    Maybe these out-of-context statements really mean "If we're filming a show in Dolby Vision and it has a lot of really dark scenes, maybe we should make a mobile version that brightens up the shadows a bit so that it's not a murky mess on a glossy mobile-phone screen under who-knows-what lighting conditions?" The Dolby Vision spec can adjust the dynamic range to meet the capabilities of the viewing device... if the device has a Dolby-manufactured ASIC. It sounds like Netflix is considering how to offer mobile users the option of a server-side tweak to do something similar.

    That would actually be a good thing, especially if the user had the option to select "normal" or "mobile optimized" versions.

    I have a Dolby Vision-equipped TV. Netflix has several shows filmed in Dolby Vision. Many, like Daredevil, have very dark cinematography. It looks incredible on a Dolby Vision TV under controlled lighting... but you're definitely missing stuff on an iPhone under commercial lighting. Bumping the darks up a notch or two to compensate would not be a terrible thing.

    • Hey, this is /., you're supposed to just crap on ideas, regardless of their actual merits. Also, no fair reading the article. 2 demerits!

  • Yes! If you watch a streaming version of a movie on Netflix, it is usually different than the same movie on DVD or Blu-ray. That is because the streaming version has been cropped to 16:9, while the disc version may have been 2.35:1 or something different. It's one reason I usually opt for discs on recent movies, instead of streaming.
    • by nasch ( 598556 )

      This isn't talking about a different format on Netflix vs. Blu-ray. If you even read the headline, let alone the summary or article, you could see it is talking about Netflix on a TV vs. Netflix on a phone.

    • I haven't bought many movies from iTunes - not since Requiem went away - but those I did buy generally kept the original aspect ratio. So a movie shot as 2.35:1, purchased from Apple, would be letterboxed on my widescreen television.

  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com]

    Seriously anyone here claiming that watching a movie or TV show on your mobile device is better than a good sized TV screen with quality audio is insane.
    • by nasch ( 598556 )

      Depends what "better" means. On a phone, I can watch a show in bed before I go to sleep without bothering the spousal unit. If I watch on the TV when I'm done I have to turn everything off and get up and go to bed. So there are advantages and disadvantages.

  • This is suicide. I need to be watching the same thing as friends or people in online forums, or how am I going to discuss things with them? And the less I can discuss, the less I am immersed. Stupid idea.

  • I like netflix, have been a subscriber for a very long time.

    But I hate trying to find something to watch on Netlix streaming.

    I *really* don't want to wade through 800 old TV shows. Or the 100 or so Netflix Originals.

    I'm primarily interested in movies. Or, rather, when I do want to watch old TV show or Netflix Original, there's already pre-defined Menus for those: "Netflix Originals" and "TV Shows" (although the latter tends to include all of the former too). I have watched several Netflix Original series an

    • by nasch ( 598556 )

      I went to a genre and got all movies, no TV shows. That isn't what happens for you?

  • Just because I am watching Netflix on my Phone does not mean I am looking at it on its 6" screen. I might have it plugged into the HDMI port on the TV in my hotel room. Do that a lot actually.

    I am cool with this but only if there is a way to select the standard version.

When it is incorrect, it is, at least *authoritatively* incorrect. -- Hitchiker's Guide To The Galaxy

Working...