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Sci-Fi Science

CERN Scientists Looking for the Force 284

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the yes-that-force dept.
An anonymous reader writes "National Geographic has a fascinating article on the God Particle, which can help explain the Standard Model and get us closer to explain the Grand Unified Theory. The obligatory Star Wars-angle summary is even better: 'CERN's scientists, the fine people who brought us the W and Z particles, anti-hydrogen atoms and hyperlinked porn web pages, are now hard at work building the Large Hadron Collider to discover something even cooler: the Force. Yes, that Force. Or like physicists call it, the Higgs boson, a particle that carries a field which interacts with every living or inert matter.'"
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CERN Scientists Looking for the Force

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  • Obligatory (Score:5, Funny)

    by drunken_boxer777 (985820) on Friday February 22, 2008 @05:45PM (#22520958)
    "Use the Large Hadron Collider, Luke."
  • by The Ancients (626689) on Friday February 22, 2008 @05:48PM (#22520992) Homepage

    ...but shouldn't they be focusing on something much more worthwhile?

    Like a working model of a lightsabre. Now that'd be really cool...

  • The keeps of the force will use the force to stop it form being know and the MIB, SGC, HWS, CIA, NSA, FBI, MI6, M12 and others will cover it up.
  • Atheism (Score:5, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday February 22, 2008 @05:50PM (#22521010)
    I don't believe in the God Particle. ...you knew that was coming.
  • by Trigun (685027)
    "...and hyperlinked porn web pages, are now hard at work building the Large Hadron Collider..."

    Hadron...

    Dammit, too much time on Slashdot
  • by The Ancients (626689) on Friday February 22, 2008 @05:55PM (#22521116) Homepage

    From a linked article:

    That's the essence of experimental particle physics: You smash stuff together and see what other stuff comes out.

    and you get to do it with really expensive, shiny toys :)

  • by Jedi Holocron (225191) on Friday February 22, 2008 @05:59PM (#22521186) Homepage Journal
    These are not the particles you are looking for.
  • hard at work, CERN's scientists are now
    the Large Hadron Collider, they are building
    brought us the W and Z particles, the fine people did
    anti-hydrogen atoms and hyperlinked porn web pages, they brought us as well, they did
    to discover something even cooler, they are
    the Force, it is
    that Force, yes, it is
    carries a field, it does, the particle
    interacts with every living or inert matter, it does
    the Higgs boson, it is
    call it so, physicists do
  • Grand Unified Theory (Score:5, Interesting)

    by should_be_linear (779431) on Friday February 22, 2008 @06:00PM (#22521204)
    If they are to find "Grand Unified Theory" I wander if it contains not only "The Function" that explains all interactions in universe but more importantly, why is function evaluated at all and how it is evaluated. Is it possible that any mathematical function can evaluate itself, and if not, is there any other explanation? That would be perhaps more interesting answer then The Function itself.
  • by Sonic McTails (700139) on Friday February 22, 2008 @06:02PM (#22521238)
    Argh, don't these guys watch TV?, the entire planet will be reduced to the size of a pea once the mass of the Higgs boson is known ....

    (for the mods, its a reference to the scifi show Lexx ...)
  • I want counts for each reasearcher. How strong are they in the Higgs Boson?
  • by petes_PoV (912422) on Friday February 22, 2008 @06:05PM (#22521276)
    The Force

    Oh dear. This is just increasing the number of people who thing that Star Trek is real. I realise that they're merely out to sell copy, but you'd hope that National Geographic would retain some sense of integrity.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by The Ancients (626689)

      Perhaps so. Another way of looking at it is that they're trying to explain the article in such a way that allows more individuals - and motivates more individuals - to actually take an interest in, and have a chance of understanding this.

      Also, from what I understand from reading the articles, technically they are correct (if a little simplistic). Both affect all particles, living or inert.

      • Who cares, I just want to see Spock and Yoda in a lightsaber battle.

        Not to be one to pick a nit (especially this geeky a nit), but Star Trek science is bad, but Star Wars science is non-existent. Popularizing science using Star Wars is like popularizing science using Pokemon.
        • Not a chance. At least if Lucas directs it, they'll probably start to engage in a battle of "wits" for half an hour, only to fall in love with each other afterwards.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Guy Harris (3803)

      but you'd hope that National Geographic would retain some sense of integrity.

      They did, as far as I can tell; I couldn't find any sign of references to "The Force" in their article [nationalgeographic.com]. That crap is from the Gizmodo article [gizmodo.com].

    • by Omestes (471991)
      Please hand in your geekcard at the door.

  • by DynaSoar (714234) on Friday February 22, 2008 @06:08PM (#22521318) Journal
    SciAm, Discover and Alan Boyle's Cosmic Log on MSNBC have all covered CERN's history and present project(s; there's two different Higgs experiments being built), and managed to do so without the silly-assed references to God particles, The Force and Star Wars. Is it too much to hope for that /. will someday stop putting out stuff written for adolescent mentalities and tastes? Probably so, since it's getting worse instead of better.
    • The Force and Star Wars. Is it too much to hope for that /. will someday stop putting out stuff written for adolescent mentalities and tastes? Probably so, since it's getting worse instead of better.
      Or maybe its because when we joined /. that we were (and likely still are) adolescents with mentalities and tastes?
      • Or maybe its because when we joined /. that we were (and likely still are) adolescents with mentalities and tastes?

        We go to Digg [digg.com] for that.
  • Or like physicists call it, the Higgs boson, a particle that carries a field which interacts with every living or inert matter.
    Pfft, physicists and they're obtuse vernacular can suck it. We all know from Episode 1 that they're called midichlorians!
    • by Trails (629752)
      Yes, I know, "their" not "they're". It's friday, it's 5:30 and I have to work this weekend, so grammar nazis can all go swing.
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heim_theory#Theory [wikipedia.org]

    Empirical confirmation of supersymmetry (for example detecting the hypothetical Lightest Supersymmetric Particle or any other particle predicted by the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model) would falsify all existing versions of Heim theory, which are mutually exclusive with supersymmetry. Also, it is not certain whether Heim theory would be able to accommodate the existence of the Higgs boson, the only undiscovered particle expected in the Standard Model, an

  • by exp(pi*sqrt(163)) (613870) on Friday February 22, 2008 @07:29PM (#22522350) Journal
    All matter is made from the same fundamental particles whether it's "living" or "inert". That is until we discover the lifeform field they use on Star Trek.
  • by dwater (72834) on Friday February 22, 2008 @08:39PM (#22522992)
    Written nicely in an entertaining way for the layman such as myself.

    I couldn't help noticing this statement though :

    "He has long, gray hair and a long, white beard and, with all due respect, looks as if he belongs on a mountaintop in Tibet."

    Those physical features are notably absent from the stereotypical mountain top Tibetan dweller - ie the Tibetan monk. Ah, using Google images shows a couple of people with long beards, but not typical, judging from the results.

    My guess is that he's talking about the Unix lab named "Tibet" at Berkeley University where you'll undoubtedly find many such specimens.

    Yes, I made that up - I've no idea if there's a Unix lab named "Tibet" at Berkeley.
  • by riceboy50 (631755) on Friday February 22, 2008 @11:02PM (#22523942)
    The large hardon is looking for Higg's bosoms? I can relate to that.

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