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30 Years of the Lego Minifig 167

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the you-should-get-that-head-bump-looked-at dept.
clikit writes "Today, the Lego Minifig turns 30 years old. Gizmodo is running a video contest with Lego, giving away Galaxy Explorer or the Yellow Castle sets and other unopened vintage sets. They also have an exclusive video from the factory, showing how the minifig is built. Check it out ... finding out how the little guys are made will make you smile." Scientists estimate that 98% of the minifigs created in the last three decades have lost a hand in a tragic vacuum accident, been melted by a magnifying glass, or been eaten by your dog.
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30 Years of the Lego Minifig

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  • Scientists estimate that 98% of the minifigs created in the last 3 decades have lost a hand in a tragic vacuum accident, been melted by a magnifying glass, or eaten by your dog.

    They forgot "blown apart by blasters, whips, and batrangs".

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      They forgot "blown apart by blasters, whips, and batrangs".

      And also BB guns, firecrackers, and gasoline.

  • by Teese (89081) <beezel AT gmail DOT com> on Monday August 25, 2008 @10:04AM (#24737195)
    For those who are curios about the arcane technical jargon in this post.
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by jacquesm (154384)

      aka as the beginning of the end of real lego.

    • by pavon (30274) on Monday August 25, 2008 @10:32AM (#24737589)

      And the reason for the name is because Lego also introduced larger figures [lugnet.com] at the same time (1974). This is actually the 30 year anniversary of articulated minifigs, as the originals didn't have movable arms or legs.

    • by Speare (84249) on Monday August 25, 2008 @10:40AM (#24737725) Homepage Journal

      My first minifigs were from the "Space" series in the mid-70s. Luckily, I didn't burn them in the back yard with kerosene or something, like I've seen other kids do. I've continued to buy a few sets a year since then. I'm not one of those guys who could build a piano out of his Lego and have enough left over for the stool, but I'm happy to hand down a nice collection to the next generation.

      Lego Nation [deviantart.com]

    • by eln (21727) on Monday August 25, 2008 @10:49AM (#24737835) Homepage

      For those who are curios

      I think the minifigs themselves would be more accurately labeled as curios, not the people wondering about them

    • by mgblst (80109)

      Yeah, really useful, what sort of idiot didn't know this!

      PS. I didn't know this.

  • by nimbius (983462) on Monday August 25, 2008 @10:06AM (#24737221) Homepage
    is 30 years of 2 am blood-curdling screams and blasphemous curses against our lord jesus when a parent happened to step on one of these things barefoot.

    lego: just because you didnt get candy at the supermarket,
    doesnt mean you cant punish mom for her insolence.
    • Gaaah! (Score:5, Funny)

      by Mr. Underbridge (666784) on Monday August 25, 2008 @10:18AM (#24737351)

      is 30 years of 2 am blood-curdling screams and blasphemous curses against our lord jesus when a parent happened to step on one of these things barefoot.

      You just gave me a 'Nam style flashback to pretty much every night this past week, and it wasn't fun. Good God, kid toys are awful. Stepping on Legos is bad - movement-sensitive toys that start a 15-minute sequence of annoying jabber because I walk within 5 feet of it when I get up to piss at night is the worst.

      I swear to God, the next one of my in-laws that buys our kid one of those demonic talking toys, I'm buying their kids a drum set or electric guitar. This shit is war.

      • Re:Gaaah! (Score:5, Funny)

        by Jason Levine (196982) on Monday August 25, 2008 @10:28AM (#24737503)

        When my son was little, his uncle bought him the Sesame Street Atom. It was the atom shaped device that rested on a stand. The child would spin it to hear music, sounds, and the voices of various Sesame Street characters. So far, so good. It was actually kind of cool. But when our son was tucked in his crib and we were in bed, we would hear the Atom starting the music/sound/voice sequence from the other room. Apparently, it would rock with the slightest movement and set off the routine. And THERE WAS NO OFF BUTTON! We finally figured out that removing it from the stand at night stopped the noise. (Thankfully, it wasn't connected to the stand in any fashion.) Now that uncle has a little girl of his own. Revenge shall be ours! (Once we find a suitably annoying toy.)

        • Re:Gaaah! (Score:5, Funny)

          by JeanCroix (99825) on Monday August 25, 2008 @10:31AM (#24737567) Journal
          All noisy battery-powered toys have off buttons - some of them just require hammers to find.
        • Re:Gaaah! (Score:5, Funny)

          by Lumpy (12016) on Monday August 25, 2008 @11:36AM (#24738475) Homepage

          Best toy revenge.

          Being an EE I took apart some toys we bought for my brothers kids... I added an extra amplifier and upgraded the speaker to make it loud as hell.

          I also disabled the on/off switch and added a tiny ballbearing/contact switch to make it trigger on movement.

          Nothing like a furby that screams... MEE EEK OOKA LIKE YOU.... FURBY WANT BRAINS... and is triggered incredibly easy.

          Bonus points if you install lithium longest life batteries and superglue the battery door shut.

          • Re:Gaaah! (Score:4, Funny)

            by Lisandro (799651) on Monday August 25, 2008 @12:50PM (#24739523)
            You have an eye patch and a white, fluffy, menacing cat, do you?
            • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

              by Lumpy (12016)

              No I gave up the evil part.. One toy before that I gave it an internal battery supply and made it randomly trigger from a PIC inside waiting from 10 minutes to 10 hours to trigger the music start.

              My joy of knowing they took the batteries out of the thing and it was STILL PLAYING THE MUSIC.

              That one was completely over the top evil. I got hell one easter Sunday about the possessed musical ball that would play music after the batteries were removed.

          • by Zordak (123132) on Monday August 25, 2008 @12:59PM (#24739637) Homepage Journal
            Didn't you have the first year EE seminar where they made you swear a solemn oath to only use your powers for good?
          • Re:Gaaah! (Score:5, Funny)

            by Mr. Underbridge (666784) on Monday August 25, 2008 @01:38PM (#24740211)

            Best toy revenge. Being an EE I took apart some toys we bought for my brothers kids... I added an extra amplifier and upgraded the speaker to make it loud as hell. I also disabled the on/off switch and added a tiny ballbearing/contact switch to make it trigger on movement. Nothing like a furby that screams... MEE EEK OOKA LIKE YOU.... FURBY WANT BRAINS... and is triggered incredibly easy. Bonus points if you install lithium longest life batteries and superglue the battery door shut.

            Oh holy shit, that's going nuclear. What the hell did your brother DO to you?

            All I can say is if anyone in the family did that to me...well, as a chemist, I'd make sure their holiday experience was not an enjoyable one, and involved many, many trips to the bathroom.

            There's a revenge heirarchy in the academic world, you know. Chemists don't screw with Biologists unless they want an exotic disease. Engineers don't mess with Chemists unless they want to be poisoned. Engineers don't screw with physicists unless they want to their house booby-trapped. Mathematicians don't screw with engineers unless they want...well, what you did to your brother.

            Poor mathematicians get no respect, only thing they have to threaten with is doing proofs during dinner.

            • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

              by svank (1301529)
              So pretty much, the better your revenge-making capacities are, the less pure [xkcd.com] you are? Makes sense.
        • by dwillden (521345)
          My Nephews grandfather(my wifes sisters hubbys dad), has the greatest nack for finding annoying toys. His best/worst so far is a toy Chainsaw, that does it's best to sound like a real one.

          Perfect for training the next generation of Chainsaw Murders.
      • Re:Gaaah! (Score:5, Interesting)

        by ProlificLurker (1349735) on Monday August 25, 2008 @10:48AM (#24737803)
        Nah, drum sets are only annoying some of the time. Try this [thinkgeek.com]
        • Yeah .. Try it.

          Its the first device I ever sent back to TG.

          3 of them actually.

          All of them had busted solder points on the battery holder when they arrived, and on #3 the battery was dead. (Verified by replacing battery and clamping the battery cradle to verify solder point problem.

          I finally got a working one last week.

          It should be "deployed" soon.
      • Re:Gaaah! (Score:5, Funny)

        by EvanED (569694) <evaned@gma[ ]com ['il.' in gap]> on Monday August 25, 2008 @10:48AM (#24737807)

        My aunt got one of my cousins a toy that had a steering wheel and such, and a button that when you pressed it would say, in an Elmo voice, "Me drive car!"

        A couple weeks later she comes home to an answering message that said "me drive car!" over and over again then my uncle saying "just wanted to know what we've been listening to for the last two weeks"

      • by blueZ3 (744446)

        When my wife and I were first married (and childless) I used to give these kinds of gifts to my nieces and nephews.

        My favorite was "DJ Johnny Bot" and extremely annoying remote controlled robot/music player that was about 18" tall. It had this feature where if you played with it and then let it sit for a few minutes, it would "say" something to get your attention again (The best of all was this annoying robotic voice saying "I put the FUN in Funky!")

        Now that I have a two-year-old daughter, and another on th

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by R2.0 (532027)

        Someone gave my daughter a light sensitive doll that made noise when the lights were turned on and off. Problem was that I think someone slipped the soundtrack from "The Exorcist" into the sampling lab - it was the creepiest doll laugh ever heard. One too many incidents where I turned on the light and immediately started looking for Chuckie and I pulled that bitch's batteries for good.

      • Re:Gaaah! (Score:5, Insightful)

        by d3ac0n (715594) on Monday August 25, 2008 @11:07AM (#24738077)

        I swear to God, the next one of my in-laws that buys our kid one of those demonic talking toys, I'm buying their kids a drum set or electric guitar. This shit is war.

        Just do what I do:

        1) Grandparents give child noisy annoying toy.

        2) Allow child to play with said toy until grandparents go home.

        3) Take toy away from child and REMOVE BATTERIES.

        4) Give toy back to child and watch him/her lose interest in toy very rapidly.

        5) Put batteries back in toy and donate to Salvation Army (Alternately, if you have a gift receipt, just return it to the store.)

        6) While out donating (or returning) annoying toy, buy child quiet, quality toy such as LEGOS, a ball, an "action figure", a dolly, a stuffed animal, ect.

        7) Tell grandparents (later) the toy broke on the first day, and that next time they should get child something more durable and less gimmicky.

        I did this for the first 5 years of each child. Eventually, the GP's got the message. Now my kids get fun and educational toys, or sports/activity related toys. For my son's 6th birthday just last month my parents gave him a 16 foot Trampoline with safety net. Both kids (6 and 7) love it and play on it every day. No annoying noisy crap toys sit around the house, and people know not to bother wasting money buying those toys for our kids.

        Of course, they all think my kids are incredibly rough with their toys, but if it keeps the crap out of my home, it's worth a little bending of the truth. (actually, the gimmicky toys wouldn't last much more than a month anyway. I just shortcut the breakage process by ensuring they "break" on the first day.)

        • While out donating (or returning) annoying toy, buy child quiet, quality toy such as LEGOS

          ...And with that, our lovely off-topic thread arcs back toward the original subject... Legos...

        • by Belial6 (794905)
          I don't get all the hate over noisy toys. Being noisy is part of being a kid.

          I don't know if you all should love me or hate me. Given that I welcome noisy toys for my 4 year old son, either I give people an outlet to buy cool toys that they don't want in their own house (because they are noisy, or they don't have kids), or I confirm to them that noisy toys are not inherently evil.
      • Re:Gaaah! (Score:4, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 25, 2008 @11:35AM (#24738463)

        I swear to God, the next one of my in-laws that buys our kid one of those demonic talking toys, I'm buying their kids a drum set or electric guitar. This shit is war.

        One of my old coworkers used to say, "If you buy my child something that makes noise, I will buy your child something that is ALIVE!"

        I think the threat of ending up with pets you don't want is a pretty good deterrent to buying a noise-making toy.

    • by CogDissident (951207) on Monday August 25, 2008 @10:23AM (#24737415)
      I still remember being like 6 years old, and looking all over for a 6inch by 6inch (rather big, for legos) space ship i built out of legos. I looked for like 2 hours, until I had an idea. I asked my friend's (exceedingly obese) mother to stand up, and she stalwartly refused and told me to go run along and play. So I sulked for an hour, and eventually found a way to make her get up (don't remember, it was a LONG time ago).

      Turns out, she just thought our couch was really uncomfortable. And, gave me a good reason to watch my weight all these years. Because, really, who wants to loose an entire spaceship in your gigantic ass?
    • Not even *half* as bad as a now-discontinued LEGO piece: the detachable wheels. Round wheels, 2x2 size, rubber tire around the rim, with a steel pin sticking out, that stuck into a matching internal-bearing block. The wheels always ended up falling pin-up, just like caltrops. Those little metal pins could go through a thin-soled shoe, and certainly could go through skin.
      They were great for making LEGO cars that coasted well but they were terrible for parents.

  • you insenstive clod!
  • I'm pretty sure if my dog had swallowed 98% of the minifigs produced in 30 years he'd be feeling pretty sick. Plus, I'd have noticed. So I doubt that claim.
  • by jollyreaper (513215) on Monday August 25, 2008 @10:11AM (#24737269)

    Scientists estimate that 98% of the minifigs created in the last 3 decades have lost a hand in a tragic vacuum accident, been melted by a magnifying glass, or eaten by your dog.

    Or how about a kid using a lighter to heat up a paperclip cherry-red so that he could reenact the ventilation shaft scene from Empire Strikes Back with his lego dudes?

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by need4mospd (1146215)
      Luke: OWW! Why'd you slice off my hand

      Vader: Its imperative you understand

      Obi Wan would never bother

      Telling you about your father

      Luke: He told me enough - he told me you killed him

      Vader: Then there's something I must reveal him

      I'm your father

      I'm your father

      I'm your father

      I'm your father

      I'm your father

      I'm your father

      I'm your father

      I'm your father

    • by hob42 (41735)

      When I was a kid, I lost a grand total of one minifig hand. (Subsequently, I melted the end the poor guy's arm so that there wasn't a gaping hole, but rather a stump. But anyway.)

      Fast forward 15 years. My 4-year-old likes to re-enact that infamous scene, but just pulls one hand out of the arm of whomever he decides is Luke. And then promptly loses the hand. So next time he uses another minifig, removing its hand and losing it as well. Then he uses another minifig...

      Nearly all of the dozens upon dozens of mi

    • by dohnut (189348)

      Dude, you could have just pulled the hand off.

      Though I guess your method better captures the original spirit of the scene.

  • Lego Bulletin Board? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Jason Levine (196982) on Monday August 25, 2008 @10:12AM (#24737279)

    Am I the only one who saw those Lego heads on that big board and thought "It'd be cool to have a Lego bulletin board in my office"? Put some big Lego sheets on the wall and then have special Lego bricks with clips to hold papers that connect to the wall sheets. Perhaps some Lego bricks with magnets embedded in them so you could stick magnetic items to part of the wall.

    • by RyoShin (610051)

      then have special Lego bricks

      Why? I'm sure you can build something yourself out of available Lego pieces. That's the point of Legos, after all, to use your imagination instead of one super-huge pre-fab piece like Megablocks.

      Step 1) Order Lego platforms in bulk
      Step 2) Superglue/duct tape to wall
      Step 3) ???
      Step 4) Painful feet!

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Jason Levine (196982)

        Looking on Lego's website, it actually looks like it would be easy to build. First I'd buy a Large Green Baseplate (10"x10") for $4.99 ( http://shop.lego.com/ByCategory/Product.aspx?p=626&cn=146&d=203 [lego.com] ). Then I would buy 2x2 flat tiles in various colors for $0.08 each and possibly some round 2x2 flat tiles for $0.11 each. (Sorry, no direct link. But you can search for "Flat Tile 2x2" on http://shop.lego.com/Product/Factory/PickABrick/PickABrick.aspx?cn=26 [lego.com] ) Assuming I buy 20 square flat tiles a

        • by RyoShin (610051)

          Lego actually has magnetic parts. They were mostly prevalent in the Aquanauts set, IIRC. I think I still see them from time to time. Unfortunately their shopping site does not seem to carry them.

          Lego also has a variety of hooking and locking parts, not to mention joints. I'm sure you could do something with out magnets (you'd still need the glue, though), especially if you look into Technic pieces.

    • We actually did this on a recent project, but with Duplo rather than Lego for better visibility. We used a series of green Duplo baseplates attached to a whiteboard as the base, and set up a burndown chart slash completion "thermometer" with colour coded Duplo blocks representing system features, and how we did, time-wise, on implementing each (green = on time, yellow = late, red = Viet Nam).
  • by gasmonso (929871) on Monday August 25, 2008 @10:15AM (#24737327) Homepage
    I'd love to see someone top the infamous Lego Beer Song: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ATBl4qH9I54 [youtube.com]
  • I thought the description "Yellow Castle" sounded like a set I owned when I was a kid. Looking at the picture; the Galaxy Explorer was the first Lego set I ever had.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      the Galaxy Explorer was the first Lego set I ever had.

      Not my first (that one goes to the Coast Guard Station one), but pretty darn close. Man that thing was cool!

      The one thing that bothered me with the space minifigs is you could see their smiling faces with the helmets. But I knew (as only an elementary schooler can) that you couldn't see the astronauts faces through the visors. So I would turn their heads around so all you could see was the yellow through the helmet.
  • by mlwmohawk (801821) on Monday August 25, 2008 @10:24AM (#24737425)

    My generation didn't have any lego people, hell we only had rectangles. No curves. I remember "clear" legos being introduced and wanting them.

    These days, the lego's are barely what I remember. Specially shaped parts, windshields, wheels!

    We had to PRETEND our model cars with square wheels could role. Thee days, kids don't have to imagine anything!!!

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by extirpater (132500)

      My generation didn't have any lego people, hell we only had rectangles. No curves. I remember "clear" legos being introduced and wanting them.

      These days, the lego's are barely what I remember. Specially shaped parts, windshields, wheels!

      We had to PRETEND our model cars with square wheels could role. Thee days, kids don't have to imagine anything!!!

      http://www.plaidstallions.com/legoman.jpg i can imagine you

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by DarkHorseman (1150085)

      Thee days, kids don't have to imagine anything!!!

      I beg to differ. I grew up with these lego sets and to me, the coolest thing was not just assembling the set the way it was meant to be, but disassembling it and finding out how to create something completely unorthodox by mixing two, or three, or my entire collection of lego's.

      I definately remember using my imagination when I built a fleet of small 4 pc. ships and one large, and elegant ship and battled them in a epic space battle all over the house against my brothers team:P

      Aah... the fun!

      • by mlwmohawk (801821)

        grew up with these lego sets and to me, the coolest thing was not just assembling the set the way it was meant to be

        In my day there was no "meant to be" it was just a tub of blocks. We built airplanes, subs, buildings, and cars with square wheels.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by Moofie (22272)

          You know, most of the grognards who cry about how lego "used to be" haven't played with some of the more recent kits. There's some seriously clever design in some of them, and I find it inspiring to see how other people do things to incorporate them into my own design.

          I think that cleverness acts as a force multiplier for the big tub o' bricks.

          • by mlwmohawk (801821)

            You know, most of the grognards who cry about how lego "used to be" haven't played with some of the more recent kits. There's some seriously clever design in some of them, and I find it inspiring to see how other people do things to incorporate them into my own design.

            I disagree. My son, who is 17 didn't find them nearly as interesting as I did as a kid.

            When you have a blank slate from which to start, anything you make is interesting. If you set up a previous expectation of how something should be built, th

            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              by Moofie (22272)

              Or, maybe, your son is different from you.

              Seems to me that the instructions in the mindstorms kits are just like the instructions in the regular kits: Good places to start.

              Good ideas create other good ideas. Creativity doesn't happen in a vacuum, and other peoples' cleverness can be a good catalyst for one's own.

          • by geek2k5 (882748)

            While I remember the old sets, I have a number of the new sets too. (Yeah, I still play with toys, especially those that allow you to build things.)

            I've always loved the modular design work that goes into Lego blocks and have often thought that areas like architecture and software design need to do a better job of working in a similar manner. While some efforts have been made, they are rather anemic.

      • by GTRacer (234395)

        My favorite "invention": I combined a novelty hat/visor thing that was lined with blinkenlights with a box o' Lego bricks. I had several of the Space sets and I was really into Sci-Fi thatnks to Star Wars and the like.

        So I built a bar, complete with tables, stools, a bar, and flashing dance lights. I achieved this by ripping the LEDs and battery from the hat and pushing the LEDs into a Technic beam (they fit perfectly)). I even made a battery compartment.

        I set it up so the roof was removable for easy pl

      • by geek2k5 (882748)

        I beg to differ. I grew up with these lego sets and to me, the coolest thing was not just assembling the set the way it was meant to be, but disassembling it and finding out how to create something completely unorthodox by mixing two, or three, or my entire collection of lego's.

        Back in 1966 or so, the sets I had available were just boxes with a handful of specialty pieces like wheels, windows, doors and roof pieces, plus a handful of clear blocks. On the box were simple models of some of the things that could be done.

        They weren't the fancy ones that have barely enough pieces to build the fancy model on the box.

        You had to use your imagination, which I did.

    • by sm62704 (957197)

      My generation had erector sets and tinker toys. I remember a robot I built out of an erector set that would travel to the end of its extension cord and stop when the plug came out of the wall. It wouldn't do much else, though - I didn't have anough parts.

      But I played with legos with my two daughters, fifteen or twenty years ago. It was as much fun as an erector set, even though you needed no screwdriver.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 25, 2008 @10:51AM (#24737851)

      Ah, your generation had it easy.

      In mine, we only got the plastic beads. We had to melt them using the frictions of our hands and sculpt them using only a fork and spoon.

      Then we had to run outside finding roots, flowers and berries, to masticate and make colors so we could paint them.

    • by 74nova (737399)
      ok, ok, I'm not on your lawn anymore!
    • I think I can go one better than that: when I was quite young we had American Bricks. They were just like LEGO bricks only they were stamped out of wood. There were 2x4 and 2x2 bricks, in (painted) red and yellow, and 2x2 angle bricks, and that was all.
      Plus they didn't stick together, they just relied on gravity to hold them together.

      On the up-side, we had a whole lot of them so we could make entire castles out of them, and once we DID get LEGO bricks we built catapults, trebuchets, and ballistae and had

      • by geek2k5 (882748)

        The building bricks I had were a hard plastic that actually had little tabs that would allow them to hold together. I think they were American Bricks, circa 1964. (I remember doing a city using the bricks, plus a number of Kenner Building sets and a square log Lincoln Log set at around that time.)

    • by Belial6 (794905)
      Oddly enough, that is why I don't buy Lego for my kid. They are no longer generic building blocks. They are now poor resolution models. When I want him to do models, I will buy him models. For 'creative' building, there are still Lincoln Logs, Tinker Toys, and Playdough.
  • by Scott Lockwood (218839) * on Monday August 25, 2008 @10:25AM (#24737443) Homepage Journal

    I read the title as 30 Years of the Lego Milfing

    Boy was I surprised!

  • The faces... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Chysn (898420) on Monday August 25, 2008 @11:09AM (#24738103)

    Backinmyday, which was the Galaxy Explorer era, all the little figures had the same face. It was a 1970s-era smiley face. The only thing that changed was the headwear: space helmet, fireman hat, girl-hair.

    Now, my son has space lego sets. The guys in the Mars Mission sets have decidedly bad-ass faces. Bad-ass facial hair with the bad-ass grimace of a real bad-ass.

    Make no mistake about this: my 1970s astronauts did not lead pleasant lives. They fought brave battles, lost limbs, sometimes cracked (literally) under the pressure. Sometimes they even had that stupid smile wiped off their faces (again, literally).

    Why do today's miniature astronauts wear their emotions on their sleeves? What happened to the steel resolve of yesteryear? Why not, when under alien attack, smile?

    Kids these days.

  • by Ellis D. Tripp (755736) on Monday August 25, 2008 @11:37AM (#24738485) Homepage

    , relax, and twist up a fatty:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E66lier98PI [youtube.com]

  • Scientists estimate that 98% of the minifigs created in the last three decades have lost a hand in a tragic vacuum accident, been melted by a magnifying glass, or been eaten by your dog.

    That dog must rattle as it walks.

  • by Digital_Quartz (75366) on Monday August 25, 2008 @03:25PM (#24741853) Homepage

    I misread this as "30 years of Lego Mining". Brings to mind visions of people hard at work, in secret underground Danish mines, toiling to harvest bricks for the children of the world.

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