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What If They Turned Off the Internet? 511

Posted by timothy
from the very-funny-now-where-is-slashdot dept.
theodp writes "It's the not-too-distant future. They've turned off the Internet. After the riots have settled down and the withdrawal symptoms have faded, how would you cope? Cracked.com asked readers to Photoshop what life would be like in an Internet-addicted society learning to cope without it. Better hope it never happens, or be prepared for dry-erase message boards, carrier pigeon-powered Twitter, block-long lines to get into adult video shops, door-to-door Rickrolling, Lolcats on Broadway, and $199.99 CDs."
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What If They Turned Off the Internet?

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 24, 2009 @09:51PM (#29861413)

    If it gets Idle off /., it wouldn't be a complete loss.

  • Uhm... wrong site. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by nametaken (610866) on Saturday October 24, 2009 @09:52PM (#29861419)

    What is this, digg? Cracked joke pages don't belong here.

    • by wizardforce (1005805) on Saturday October 24, 2009 @10:11PM (#29861535) Journal

      Idle and Slashdot 2.0 don't belong on Slashdot either. Unfortunately, someone behind the scenes thought that the best way to lure new users was to emulate Digg instead of doing what Slashdot did best; allow nerds and geeks to discuss interesting articles and thus provide intellectual entertainment. I think that they'll find that the whole charm of Slashdot was the discussion after the article and it is what made Slashdot worth returning to on a daily basis.

      • by eln (21727)
        It's been all downhill since the Politics section...that's when they turned the corner from Geek Street to Whatever Brings in the Most Page Hits Boulevard.
        • I agree. THe sad part is that it could have gone better than it did. Slashdot could have stimulated some very interesting discussions in terms of politics however, as you said, it turned out to be just another way to stir up trouble and thus page views.

    • by altek (119814) on Saturday October 24, 2009 @10:40PM (#29861709) Homepage

      +1000

      I have been on /. since it launched (yeah, back then we nerds were quite resistant to ever creating logins for sites, hence my non-low account ID). And it seems in the last 6 months or so it's been going this way - I have gone to reading it in Google Reader and also have Gizmodo and Engadget in there as well. It seems like at least a third of the posts lately are just regurgitated from Giz and Engadget, a day or so later.

      My thought is that the internet has grown so huge, that /. can't compete with sites that have pageviews hundreds of times higher, and this is their way of sucking in some extra pageviews.

      The content on here has definitely changed. I still find some engaging comment threads, but it just seems like the truly geeky content has gotten watered down with posts about new products, jokes, etc.

      Part of it may just be that the tech world as a whole has transformed from what it was in the mid-nineties. Back then, everything was awe-inspiring and amazing in the tech world, and now it's all pretty pedestrian, we've become quite jaded.

      And, our attention spans have gotten so short, that spending a half hour reading an article about a distributed network cracking the latest encryption algorithm gets pushed under the three posts about new cell phones. And a simple yet brilliant idea is no longer brilliant, it's just expected from middle management in the outsourced development sweatshops.

      • The content on here has definitely changed. I still find some engaging comment threads, but it just seems like the truly geeky content has gotten watered down with posts about new products, jokes, etc.

        Exactly. And since both nature and my cat abhor vacuums, where the hell are the good geek new sites now?

        I currently have to settle for reading mildly interesting arguments about IPv6 on NANOG.

        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by JWSmythe (446288)

          I can tell I've been up just a little too long. I spun through an amazing variety of imagery in my head. It was just enough to make me fall out of my chair.

          Cat in a plexiglass box, with a pump pulling 22 in/hg vacuum.

          Cat in an upright bagless vacuum cleaner. (even in my imagination, it's a tight fit)

          Cat in an airlock on the ISS. Explosive decompression follows.

          Cat in an airlock on the ISS. Slow decompression follows, slowly.

        • by MichaelSmith (789609) on Sunday October 25, 2009 @12:25AM (#29862217) Homepage Journal

          The content on here has definitely changed. I still find some engaging comment threads, but it just seems like the truly geeky content has gotten watered down with posts about new products, jokes, etc.

          Exactly. And since both nature and my cat abhor vacuums, where the hell are the good geek new sites now?

          I used to enjoy Technocrat. I wish Bruce had shown an interest in letting the community move off his server.

      • by Brian Gordon (987471) on Saturday October 24, 2009 @10:53PM (#29861793)

        I have been on /. since it launched (yeah, back then we nerds were quite resistant to ever creating logins for sites, hence my non-low account ID).

        Uhhh yeah me too

      • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 24, 2009 @11:14PM (#29861917)

        While much of you may lament the current days of slashdot, when I started visiting it ~4-6 years ago it was filled with memes (I havn't seen a soviet russia joke in quite some time), first post jokes (GNAA) and dupes. Now it seems like most days most of the memes have rightfully left for reddit/digg. So while the comments have gotten better, the articles have probably gotten worse. What slashdot needs to do is evaluate the story submission process and the mods currently in control to emphasize less bullshit and more tech.

      • by ZipprHead (106133) on Sunday October 25, 2009 @01:15AM (#29862417) Homepage

        Being a long time reader myself, I'll have to say /. does have some strong competition of late with Engadget scooping stories first and BoingBoings editorial staff. But what makes this site awesome, is the commenting, moderation and user community. To this day, I often get what I need to know from the article and summaries. Engadget and other sites can not hold a candle to this community.

        Kudos to us all!

      • by mikael (484) on Sunday October 25, 2009 @01:59AM (#29862589)

        Back then, everything was awe-inspiring and amazing in the tech world

        That era was when Nvida/3dfx were first founded - the first texture mapping graphics cards came out, then full transformation and lighting in hardware, Quake, then wide screen resolutions. 450 MHz Pentium III processors seemed super-zippy fast. Microsoft introduced 'sockets' to Windows and announced that Windows NT had made UNIX legacy. SGI wanted to prove that a software based OpenGL would be as fast as custom game rendering code. ADSL broadband was becoming available in some apartments. Previously low-key student houses who just happened to have broadband connections found themselves the most popular destinations for new students. The battle between Internet Explorer and Netscape Navigator had begun. Cell phones still had a long antennae coming out the top.

        Just before in 1994, having a 56K modem was a major advancement, Windows 3.1 was still the main development target. Reading USENET, text based discussion boards and subscribing to mailing lists was the main method of getting news. Viewing images would require using ftp manually or using uuencode/decode to get a server to fetch a 640x480 image, encode it as ASCII, slice the file up and send it to you in chunks, which you could then reassemble manually.

        Now, if your cable provider goes from 50 Mbits to 70 Mbits, that isn't noticable, though laptop screen have shrunk a bit, and everyone uses LCD monitors now. Just about every mobile phone seems to look like a touchpad PDA or has a little keyboard and allows the user to play movies and music. MP3 players are the size of credit cards. USB Keychains now store more information than a DVD let alone a 1996 hard disk drive. What could just about be done on supercomputer in 1996, can now be done on a graphics card.

      • by DoninIN (115418) <don.middendorf@gmail.com> on Sunday October 25, 2009 @09:11AM (#29863955) Homepage
        I used to hit this empty domain, three times a day, before there was ever a slashdot. I hoped someday there's be a website here, and it would be about technology news, and news in the new era. Before that I sent postcards to slash dot oregon, that just said First Post!
    • by AlpineR (32307)

      What is this, digg? Cracked joke pages don't belong here.

      So you're saying that an idea should rejected because of its source, regardless of the value of the idea itself?

      I think the title of the Cracked article is indeed interesting: What would happen if the Internet disappeared? Many of the Slashdot commenters here are responding with insight and information. And many of the doctored photos are insightful themselves: garage sales and newspapers would regain importance, brick-and-mortar stores would regain p

  • by Shadow Wrought (586631) * <shadow...wrought@@@gmail...com> on Saturday October 24, 2009 @09:53PM (#29861429) Homepage Journal
    Isn't this what the Mayan's prophisied for 2012?
  • It's not so bad. (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Ralph Spoilsport (673134) on Saturday October 24, 2009 @09:54PM (#29861439) Journal
    I remember an age before the internet. It was harder to find information and other data, but it wasn't so bad. The things you did have access to you took a bit more seriously. I spent more time at the library then. And I had an extensive cassette tape collection... No Internet != no computers, so rather than DL music, I suspect I would spend more time at LAN parties, which are always fun.
    • I mis-remember it (Score:4, Interesting)

      by Jay L (74152) * <jay+slash@NoSPam.jay.fm> on Saturday October 24, 2009 @10:22PM (#29861605) Homepage

      I'm always struck by my pre-Internet memories, because I have no recollection of how I learned timely, geek-related facts. I was a huge Trek fan in high school, and I knew all about conventions and movie plans and whatnot. I'm sure I got some of it from BBS's, and I must have subscribed to some 'zines, but how did I ever find those without - not just without the Internet, but without ubiquitous search?

    • by eln (21727) on Saturday October 24, 2009 @10:26PM (#29861631) Homepage
      True, life was just fine before the Internet. Now, though, the Internet has infiltrated almost every aspect of our daily lives. Given that, if the Internet were to be shut off permanently, we would have to do without a lot of conveniences we've become accustomed to, which would make it a lot more painful than life before the Internet was. To throw in the requisite car analogy, life without cars probably wasn't all that horrible (at least, not due to the lack of cars specifically). However, now that cars are a major part of the fabric of our everyday lives, it would be substantially more painful to give them up completely now.

      Add to all this the fact that a large percentage of us would have to find something else to do for a living, and many of us would have to emerge from the basements we've been in since 1987, and you have a real problem.
      • Re:It's not so bad. (Score:5, Interesting)

        by Ralph Spoilsport (673134) on Saturday October 24, 2009 @10:34PM (#29861679) Journal
        Yeah - the transition would suck.

        In counterpoint, a friend of mine survived the "special times" in Cuba (basically, a massive powerdown) and said that the first six months pretty much sucked ass. But then you started to smile again, because the water was still warm and inviting, and you still had your friends, and you began to have fun. Only no one drove cars, and you invented things to do that didn't require money, electricity, or petroleum. A year after - you're fine. Different and less comfortable, but fine.

        RS

      • by macshit (157376)

        now that cars are a major part of the fabric of our everyday lives, it would be substantially more painful to give them up completely now.

        This is only true in places where the physical infrastructure was designed or substantially altered to suit cars -- e.g., new-style suburbs or spread-out rural areas. Many places which developed in an earlier era, or have a more enlightened attitude towards planning, would cope pretty well. [A much bigger problem would be the lack of delivery trucks!] The USA would take a disproportionately large hit because it's engaged in pro-car planning so furiously.

        So, the question is: has the underlying fabric of

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by Planesdragon (210349)

          So, the question is: has the underlying fabric of mainstream society changed since pre-internet days, to such a great extent that society would fall apart without the internet? I'd say no way.

          Open up your wallet.

          EVERYTHING but the cash is linked to the internet in some way or another for its vital function.

          Driver's License? The police officer checks it over the internet against records that essentially only exist digitally on the internet.

          Checkbook? When you write a check, the payee deposits it in his bank, who gives her funds drawn from the federal reserve over the internet, then sends an image of the check to your central bank over the internet, which then contacts your branch and updates yo

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by evilviper (135110)

        However, now that cars are a major part of the fabric of our everyday lives, it would be substantially more painful to give them up completely now.

        It wouldn't be too bad. Bicycles work as well now as they ever did. Without cars filling up the streets, we'd have plenty of open road to bike to/from work, stores, etc.

        Supply and demand would kick in, and in short order, instead of mega shopping malls on the edge of cities, there would be a large number of smaller stores throughout each town. Instead of peopl

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by TubeSteak (669689)

      I remember an age before the internet.

      Me too. For-profit copyright infringement was a bigger problem back in the days of dial-up.
      Bittorrent and iTunes took the wind from their sails.
      If the internet was turned off, I imagine that commercial copyright infringers will return with a vengence.

    • by antdude (79039)

      For me, it was bulletin board system (BBS) days. Good stuff.

    • by Molochi (555357) on Sunday October 25, 2009 @12:03AM (#29862143)

      I started out on a BBS in the mid 80s and later BBS networks like fido and WWIV. Back then I paid for longdistance. The main allure of the internet, that came along later, was being able to access a computer outside of my area code without a per minute fee or paying the BBS's longdistance fee. Bandwidth of the internet then wasn't all that special. Pirate BBSs were common. Porn BBSs were common. "EMail" and messageboards and turn based games on BBSs were common. Of course you had CompuServe as well. All of that folded their tents when almost anyone could set up a server to the internet and talk to anyone else on the internet.

      I guess if I woke up tomorrow and there was just no internet anymore, I'd set up a BBS network. I'd expect it to be really busy since long distance is so cheap and data is so bloated now. But it's really a ridiculous question unless it's specified what it is that no longer works. No DNS? That just requires ip addresses. Cumbersome, but doable. Go much further than that and nothing works, including phones and BBSs. In which case my basic engineering, practical fabrication, and hunting/looting skills should become useful.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 24, 2009 @09:55PM (#29861441)

    http://www.southparkstudios.com/episodes/166179/ [southparkstudios.com]

    They covered basically every topic in there

  • by ZiakII (829432) on Saturday October 24, 2009 @09:57PM (#29861453)
    Randy: And so what have we learned through this ordeal? The internet went away. It came back. But for how long, we do not know. We cannot take the internet for granted any longer. We, as a country, must stop over logging-on. We must use the internet only when we need it. It's easy for us to think we can just use up all the internet we want. But if we don't treat the internet with the RESPECT (pounds the podium with his fist)...that it deserves, it could one day be gone forever. So let us learn to live with the internet not for it. No more browsing for no apparent reason. No more mindlessly surfing on our laptops while watching television. And finally, we must learn to only use the internet for porn twice a day. Max
  • BBS (Score:5, Interesting)

    by lothos (10657) on Saturday October 24, 2009 @10:00PM (#29861479) Homepage

    we'd be using our 1200bps modems connecting to the local BBS and swapping email over fido.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Aoet_325 (1396661)

      "we'd be using our 1200bps modems connecting to the local BBS and swapping email over fido."

      exactly what I did in the old days. As long as computers are around, people will find a way to connect them and connect themselves to each other using them. I suspect that while dial up might not be answer people run to these days I could see people setting up wireless networks within their own neighborhoods, and extending them into WANs that cover a good part of their city.

      • Re:BBS (Score:5, Interesting)

        by causality (777677) on Saturday October 24, 2009 @10:43PM (#29861727)

        "we'd be using our 1200bps modems connecting to the local BBS and swapping email over fido."

        exactly what I did in the old days. As long as computers are around, people will find a way to connect them and connect themselves to each other using them. I suspect that while dial up might not be answer people run to these days I could see people setting up wireless networks within their own neighborhoods, and extending them into WANs that cover a good part of their city.

        This has already been worked out [wikipedia.org]. It has a tremendous advantage, too: it would be more difficult for a company or government to either shut it down or personally identify individual users.

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by Darkness404 (1287218)
          The downside with mesh networking is that it would be unfeasible to use for either political statements or file sharing for any practical use. Lets assume that everyone uses their standard equipment just with different firmware to use mesh networking (not unlikely if the internet was shut down for some odd reason) any router can only go between 2-3 houses on either side of a neighborhood max. That means that unless just about every other house in the city had the same networking going on, it would be just a
  • Work? (Score:5, Funny)

    by Ogive17 (691899) on Saturday October 24, 2009 @10:00PM (#29861481)
    I'd probably get some work done... though I'm not sure how since our data is stored in Colorado and I'm in Ohio.
  • What I would do? (Score:3, Interesting)

    by MindlessAutomata (1282944) on Saturday October 24, 2009 @10:06PM (#29861499)

    Let's face it, by then the shit will have hit the fan. Mankind will have been put under its own boot, with either one of two situations occuring: Men ruled by man or man ruled by men. Neither world is acceptable to me, not like this one is a model existence either.

    I'd put on my headband, boots, camo pants, and grab whatever black market guns I could find (by then guns will be outlawed so we can become more in-line with the more "progressive" nations) and maybe grenade or two. I'd light a cigarette to go with my 5 o'clock shadow, strap on a bullet belt, and teach any of the dogs responsible for this mess, including those that tried to stop me, what the inside of hell looks like, all while Foetus's Anything (Viva!) [www.last.fm] played in the background. Rule of law? I'll show you Newton's first law: my bullet will hit their heads which will cause their brains to spray out.

    There's no coping in my world. Only the blood of those responsible for this mess. Everywhere.

    • by tftp (111690)

      I'd light a cigarette to go with my 5 o'clock shadow, strap on a bullet belt, and teach any of the dogs responsible for this mess,

      And once you are well on your war path you will suddenly discover that bullets [eabco.com] in your bullet belt don't come with cartridge [eabco.com], primer [cabelas.com] and powder [eabco.com] charge. You'd have to throw them, real hard :-) or perhaps study ahead of time how this whole thing works.

      • by MindlessAutomata (1282944) on Saturday October 24, 2009 @10:19PM (#29861583)

        You are mistaken, sir, I plan to do it exactly like they do it in the movies. I even have the little "jumping out of an exploding train" sequence planned out in my head.

  • chans (Score:3, Funny)

    by Luke Wilson (1626541) on Saturday October 24, 2009 @10:06PM (#29861503)
    as for forums, obligatory comic: http://theurf.com/2008/07/offline-box-forums/ [theurf.com]
  • new poll (Score:5, Funny)

    by tloh (451585) on Saturday October 24, 2009 @10:11PM (#29861527)

    What would replace the internet?

    a)sneaker net
    b)ip over avian carriers
    c)johnny mnemonic
    d)radio killed the itunes store
    e)cowboy neal
    f)breasts (the live nude version on a real female)

  • They faked breaking the internet and people panicked and stampeded over each other. Even though it is a sitcom, this is probably accurate.

    If Al Gore invented the internet, it will probably be Crazy Ol' Uncle Joe (Biden) who breaks it.

  • Ignoring for the moment that I generally grab what I might want from the net in the future as I find it (too many sites go "poof"), the only context in which "they" would turn off the Internet would be one of dire civil war (e.g. worse than what recently happened in Iran).

    I doubt I'd actually be in a foxhole (that sort of implies you're fighting by the other side's rules), but I wouldn't take it laying down, nor would a lot of people like me.

    • > I doubt I'd actually be in a foxhole (that sort of implies you're fighting by
      > the other side's rules)...

      Having dirt between you and the bullets is good.

      • by causality (777677)

        > I doubt I'd actually be in a foxhole (that sort of implies you're fighting by > the other side's rules)...

        Having dirt between you and the bullets is good.

        "You may find me one day, dead in a ditch somewhere. But by God, you'll find me in a pile of brass."
        -- Trooper M. Padgett

      • Having dirt between you and the bullets is good.

        True enough, and it is best to remember the difference between cover and concealment ... but perhaps it's best (in this sort of thing) to be somewhere no one is shooting at. If you must shoot, then fire only once---very hard to tell where a supersonic bullet comes from due to the sonic boom it makes---and then "scoot".

  • Profit!!

  • Ad-Hoc Network (Score:2, Interesting)

    by richtopia (924742)
    Could the internet eventually be replaced with a mesh network? Maybe because I'm in student housing right now, but without the internet, we'd probably go about setting up an Ad-Hoc network in our building, then expand that to others we want to talk to (like a cantenna to the university buildings across the way). Sure, I wouldn't be able to post on Slashdot, but I could probably scrounge up enough movies to keep playing for a couple of years. Porn on the other hand, we'd have to get creative.
    • by Angostura (703910)

      What you are saying is that if The Internet was turned off, you'd start building an internet.

      I'm sure others would start doing the same too. You could peer with them.

    • by grcumb (781340)

      Could the internet eventually be replaced with a mesh network? Maybe because I'm in student housing right now, but without the internet, we'd probably go about setting up an Ad-Hoc network in our building, then expand that to others we want to talk to (like a cantenna to the university buildings across the way). Sure, I wouldn't be able to post on Slashdot, but I could probably scrounge up enough movies to keep playing for a couple of years. Porn on the other hand, we'd have to get creative.

      Congratulations! You just re-invented FidoNet.

  • After the riots have settled down and the withdrawal symptoms have faded

    I expect to see a geek in a riot about the same time BnL perfects the all-terrain hover chair.

  • Having lived most of my life without it, easily. I'd miss it, but I'd survive. I still remember how to do business via telephone and snail-mail. I still have most of my old reference books and the magazine publishers would spring back to life and bombard me with subscription offers. Bookstores would make a comeback.
    (And we'd revive the old dialup UUCP-based Usenet, of course.)

    Television, record stores, and movies would be revitalized, but that doesn't matter to me.

    A much more serious problem would be the

  • And once again, glory would be ours.

    - You'd dust off your old US Robotics modems.
    - People would set up BBS'es.
    - We'd WiFi honeypot each other...

  • by shadowbearer (554144) on Saturday October 24, 2009 @10:42PM (#29861723) Homepage Journal

      would cry out in terror... silently.

      Except for the calls to their ISPs...

    SB

  • by Hurricane78 (562437) <.gro.todhsals. .ta. .deteled.> on Saturday October 24, 2009 @10:50PM (#29861777)

    Because it would never happen.

    Why I'm so sure? Because there is no "they" in the Internet. Everybody can connect to his neighbors' wifi router, if needed. And the moment when no company on the planet is interested in using the now unused wires and cell phone towers, to sell services to customers, is the moment when humanity itself ceases to exist.

    I don't see a point in imagining not having the Internet. And I know how it would look anyway, since I already lived when there was no such thing. I even know how life in a monastery without electricity is. Or in a hut in the middle of nowhere.

    Now, that we know of the concept of a Internet, as long as there is a critical mass of humans exists, there will be such a network. :)

  • by Animats (122034) on Saturday October 24, 2009 @11:04PM (#29861857) Homepage

    All it would take is one really bad Windows Update to turn off 70% of the Internet.

    Question for Homeland Security: who has access to the master signing key for Windows Update? Who does the background check on those people?

  • Next Sunday, A.D.?

    • Slashdot is one of the few places where a future spent trapped on a satellite watching bad movies with sarcastic robots could be considered utopian.

  • Books will be read, assignments will be completed by students, TV will return to the entertainment center of the livingroom, people will not stay up all night, games will be payed on a board, you'll have to pick up a pen and write to people, or dust off your printer. (you do know that impact printers were cheaper to run and lasted longer than inkjets) I would welcome that future. There was data transfer before the 'net, BBS, forums, chat, can all work without the net, thus we may just find a different way t

  • DEAD.MP4 (Score:4, Funny)

    by SEWilco (27983) on Saturday October 24, 2009 @11:18PM (#29861937) Journal
    Death of the Internet predicted.
    MPEG at 11.
  • Sites like cracked.com (and tvtropes.org) need an explicit warning:

    "Caution: After clicking on this link you may lose all awareness of the passage of time. If you have anything that you need to do in the next 3-4 hours you probably don't want to go there"

  • in the force. It would be as if millions of voices cried out and instantly could find no more porn.
  • ... of doing a goddamn crossword again. My *shortcuts* have shortcuts to Google. How the hell am I supposed to resist the sum total of all human knowledge when I'm stuck with "42D: 1972 Red Sox shortstop (8 letters)" and all I've got is a tentative P crossing through the second space?

  • by Destoo (530123) <{destoo} {at} {gmail.com}> on Saturday October 24, 2009 @11:39PM (#29862055) Homepage Journal

    Doug Adams wrote about it ten years ago, and it still applies.
    http://www.douglasadams.com/dna/19990901-00-a.html [douglasadams.com]

    A couple of years or so ago I was a guest on Start The Week, and I was authoritatively informed by a very distinguished journalist that the whole Internet thing was just a silly fad like ham radio in the fifties, and that if I thought any different I was really a bit naïve. It is a very British trait – natural, perhaps, for a country which has lost an empire and found Mr Blobby – to be so suspicious of change.
    (...)
    I suppose earlier generations had to sit through all this huffing and puffing with the invention of television, the phone, cinema, radio, the car, the bicycle, printing, the wheel and so on, but you would think we would learn the way these things work, which is this:
    1) everything that’s already in the world when you’re born is just normal;
    2) anything that gets invented between then and before you turn thirty is incredibly exciting and creative and with any luck you can make a career out of it;
    3) anything that gets invented after you’re thirty is against the natural order of things and the beginning of the end of civilisation as we know it until it’s been around for about ten years when it gradually turns out to be alright really.
    Apply this list to movies, rock music, word processors and mobile phones to work out how old you are.

  • We could rebuild it. We have the technology.
  • I demand Cmdr Taco BUY MODEMS now just in case!
  • by genner (694963) on Sunday October 25, 2009 @12:28AM (#29862233)
    I remember the good old days before the internet was everywhere. We had ascii and RIP graphics, door games, and FIDOnet.

    If anyone needs me I'll be leveling my L.O.R.D. character.
  • The Future (Score:3, Funny)

    by BigBadBus (653823) on Sunday October 25, 2009 @09:23AM (#29864019) Homepage
    For goodness sake, don't let the Discovery Channel read this thread. There'll be weeks of interminable documentaries if they do....

A sheet of paper is an ink-lined plane. -- Willard Espy, "An Almanac of Words at Play"

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