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Homer Simpson Named Greatest TV Character 142

Posted by samzenpus
from the all-my-life-I've-had-one-dream-to-achieve-my-many-goals dept.
A survey by Entertainment Weekly has named Homer Simpson the greatest character created for television or film in the past 20 years. Everyone's favorite beer-swilling, donut-eating dad beat out Harry Potter and Buffy the Vampire Slayer for the top spot. From the article: "'People can relate to Homer because we're all secretly propelled by desires we can't admit to,' Groening was quoted as telling Entertainment Weekly. 'Homer is launching himself head-first into every single impulsive thought that occurs to him. His love of whatever ... is a joy to witness.'"

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Homer Simpson Named Greatest TV Character

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  • Apropos (Score:3, Funny)

    by MonsterTrimble (1205334) <monstertrimbleNO@SPAMhotmail.com> on Wednesday June 02, 2010 @01:05PM (#32434892)
    That Harry Potter & Buffy yelled 'Doh!'
  • by oldhack (1037484) on Wednesday June 02, 2010 @01:08PM (#32434948)

    Weird, strange, sick, twisted, eerie, godless, evil stuff.

    And I want in.

  • Greatest? (Score:5, Funny)

    by HeckRuler (1369601) on Wednesday June 02, 2010 @01:09PM (#32434966)
    If by "great" you mean "iconic", sure. And in TV land the two are probably synonymous. But back in my day, you had to conquer Asia-Minor to be considered "great".
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by geekoid (135745)

      So going into space isn't great? travelling through dimensions? I mean, he's no inanimate carbon rod, but who is?

      Besides, even Homer isn't stupid enough to get into a land war in Asia.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by UnknowingFool (672806)
      Especially if you did it without a flag.
    • by thomst (1640045)

      If by "great" you mean "iconic", sure. And in TV land the two are probably synonymous. But back in my day, you had to conquer Asia-Minor to be considered "great".

      Your day was 2300-some-odd years ago?

      Dude, you're old!

      • by Kozz (7764) on Wednesday June 02, 2010 @03:58PM (#32437220)

        If by "great" you mean "iconic", sure. And in TV land the two are probably synonymous. But back in my day, you had to conquer Asia-Minor to be considered "great".

        Your day was 2300-some-odd years ago?

        Dude, you're old!

        Indeed. Get out of his hanging gardens!

    • HAHAHA- why I laugh?
    • Well, those of you who think Alexander [imdb.com] was such a great movie are lone voices in the wilderness, I am afraid.
    • by palndrumm (416336) *

      Maybe it was great as in large or immense? Did they use it in the pejorative sense...?

    • by Linknoid (46137)

      Of course he's Homer the Great [wikipedia.org], haven't you see season 6 episode 12?

  • woo hoo take that 60 minutes

  • Homer: Uh, I'm somewhere where I don't know where I am.
    Marge: Do you see towels? If you see towels, you're probably in the linen closet again.
    Homer: Just a second...no, it's a place I've never been before.
    Selma: Hmm. The shower. [laughs]
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by eln (21727)
      Actually he was created in 1987 for the Tracey Ullman Show, which makes this choice just that much more ridiculous.
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by oddTodd123 (1806894)
      That's the least of their problems. Number 2 (Harry Potter) was created for a book. Number 5 (Joker) was created for comics in the 1960s. Numbers 8 (Hannibal Lecter) and 9 (Carrie Bradshaw) were originally created for books as well. So this is really the list of the top characters appearing in television or film in the last 20 years.
      • Just sayin'. Otherwise, you're spot-on.
      • Re: (Score:1, Troll)

        by geekoid (135745)

        television or film.

        Learn to read.

      • by Rary (566291) on Wednesday June 02, 2010 @01:39PM (#32435428)

        That's the least of their problems. Number 2 (Harry Potter) was created for a book. Number 5 (Joker) was created for comics in the 1960s. Numbers 8 (Hannibal Lecter) and 9 (Carrie Bradshaw) were originally created for books as well. So this is really the list of the top characters appearing in television or film in the last 20 years.

        Actually, everyone is quoting TFA and TFS, but if you actually go to the source [ew.com], it doesn't actually use the words "created" or "TV". It's simply "The 100 Greatest Characters of the Last 20 Years". They specifically refer to the "100 greatest characters in pop-culture" and state "(w)hether the fictional women, men, ogres, muppets, babies, and cartoon rockers who made our list were initially created before 1990 didn’t matter so long as they made a lasting impact in the culture after 1990."

      • > So this is really the list of the top characters appearing in television or
        > film in the last 20 years.

        Well, sure. This is about tv and movies. Start demanding creativity and you'll have nothing.

      • by mattack2 (1165421)

        That's the least of their problems. Number 2 (Harry Potter) was created for a book. Number 5 (Joker) was created for comics in the 1960s.

        Others have pointed out the main flaw in your argument. Also, the Joker was in Batman #1 in 1940.

    • by rm999 (775449)

      Who cares when a character was created? The poll should be read as "the greatest character from the past 20 years who was created specifically for television/film".

  • by magusxxx (751600) <magusxxx_2000@[ ]oo.com ['yah' in gap]> on Wednesday June 02, 2010 @01:36PM (#32435362)
    I would have said Al Bundy. *shrug* Peg: Miss me? Al: With every bullet so far.
    • I agree with you, but ask any teenager today who Al Bundy was, and you will get a blank stare. Simpsons spans the generations.
      • by FreonTrip (694097)

        Married with Children is on syndication an awful lot... I'd expect most teenagers to be passingly familiar, but it was past its prime for years before it went off the air in 1997. The Simpsons spans the generations because it's been on the air for over a generation, and because its early and loyal fanbase have turned it into a nigh-immortal Great Wyrm of prime time television.

        On the bright side, Ed O'Neill finally stopped being typecast.

    • Re: (Score:1, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward
      I like Peg: So what I'm a stay home mom, let the men work its only going to kill them sooner
    • Seconded. Nothing beats Al Bundy.
      The amount of epic quotes and facial expressions alone is endless.
      (Sorry, I only saw the German version. So the translations may not be the exact ones you knew.)

      • They aren’t fat. They only have a cream filling!
      • Today a fat woman came to the shoe store. She was so fat, that three smaller women revolved around her!
      • Al: Son? What is the family credo? Bud: Hooters, hooters, yum, yum, yum! Al: No, the other one!
      • (Bud is in a Mexican shoe factory / sweat shop, and writes “
      • by Wovel (964431)

        Those quotes are interesting to someone who is a true fan of the show, but even combined they fail to have even a fraction of the impact on pop-culture of doh!. Homer Simpson gave life to a new television network and has remained popular enough for the past 20 years to continue to create new programs that people want to watch. People bring up a lot of great examples and all good have there place from 2 to 100. We could easily argue the order of 2 to 100 as well. Homer is in a class by himself.

  • Everyman (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Yungoe (415568) on Wednesday June 02, 2010 @01:43PM (#32435490)

    The reason Homer is so appealing to us is because he is Everyman, at his worst. Whenever he does something I either have done it, thought about doing it or know someone who did it.

    • Re:Everyman (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Abcd1234 (188840) on Wednesday June 02, 2010 @02:01PM (#32435762) Homepage

      Simultaneously, at least during the golden years of the series, Homer, while not very bright, was portrayed as being a loving father who wanted to do the right by his family, even if he didn't always know how to. "And Maggie Makes Three" is the absolute perfect example of this (and is one of my favorite episodes of the series as a consequence), but there are a many others.

      As such, we can related to him on multiple levels, as he exemplifies both the best and the worst of people.

      • That is actually a good and interesting point. That it was once about the struggle about a far from perfect man, to do the best he can... and even when it’s usually more a catastrophe that is then averted, I can still understand (it makes sense in the story universe) why Marge loves him. :)

    • by rwa2 (4391) *

      Yes! Bring on the ob. Simpsons references!

    • The reason Homer is so appealing to us is because he is Everyman, at his worst. Whenever he does something I either have done it, thought about doing it or know someone who did it.

      So appalling to us, I hope you mean. As a fat IT guy, I bore more than a passing resemblance to Michael Moore which I did not mind but I also looked a bit like Peter Griffin which I found disturbing. I like Moore's politics but hate Peter's stupidity. If there's any Family Guy character I'd rather be called similar to, it would be Brian! Getting told I looked like Peter was the final straw and I started going to the gym. Down 51 lbs now. Now I don't look like either of 'em. Now people say I look like the sl

    • by Hatta (162192)

      That was the case, back in the 90s. Then they ran out of normal stuff for Homer to do and sent him on all sorts of wacky adventures.

    • Yes, I too have often thought about climbing the Murderhorn and sledding down on the frozen body of the guy my Grandpa cannibalized. Gee, I thought it was just me...
    • The reason Homer is so appealing to us is because he is Everyman, at his worst.

      Yes exactly! I think also because although he does let his desires lead him, his love for his family conquers all.

    • So your point is, that you like him, because he shows you how much of an epic failure you are? ;)

      I haven’t done all that dumb stuff. I’m proud of it. And yes, that makes me better than Homer.
      (Now please keep down the crab mentality. It is not right to hate people who did not fail. Any you are not entitled to a part of their success. It’s right though, to hate people who want to take and not give something back. Like for example those who want others to give them something of their success

  • Upon haphazardly compiling a potential list for this I thought: "All right, brain, I don't like you and you don't like me - so let's just do this and I'll get back to killing you with beer."
  • Homer: Ohhhh! Why Me?
    Marge: Homey, it's a great accomplishment.
    Homer: Will I get donuts? mmmmmmm Donuts mmmmmmmmmm
    Marge: No, but you're more entertaining than Peter Griffen.
    Homer: Whoo Hoo!

  • I find Homer's character to be too two dimensional... He lacks depth.

    But seriously, I have mixed feelings about that choice. Let me say that I could see Homer being the tops of many notable lists; he is *a* great character. He's a little bit Everyman, and a little bit of satire of the "Everyotherman" (if I may be allowed to invent a word here... It's perfectly cromulent!)

    However, It just seems a bit superficial to me to say the greatest character of TV or Film in 20 years. There are so many great chara

  • I have tried to watch the Simpsons twice. It was so mind-numbingly stupid I couldn't stand to watch more then ten minutes combined. I am willing to admit that perhaps I chose the wrong ten minutes to watch, but one scene (back within the first 3 seasons) had Bart being rude in school, and the other had Homer chasing something (a doughnut??) through traffic.

    IMHO Bugs Bunny had more wit and style.

    What is the best episode to watch that might convince me it is worth the effort?

    • by Abcd1234 (188840)

      Depends greatly on your taste. I happen to think "And Maggie Makes Three", which is wonderfully touching, is one of the best episodes ever aired. "Bart Be Not Proud" is also excellent for similar reasons, and shows a whole other side to Bart.

      On the flipside, you have classic satirical episodes like "Marge vs The Monorail", "Homer the Great", and "Last Exit to Springfield". And then there's the utterly brilliant Treehouse of Horrors II, III, and IV (the sweet spot for the Treehouse episodes, IMHO).

  • Never play a game you can't win, son.

  • John Marshall, Charles Evans Hughes, Warren Burger.. Mmm, burger..
  • OK, if it was atleast even a real fictional character played by a real actor i could swallow it,
    but somehow, i am having a hard time with this one, maybe the fact that i have no duff beer to wash it down with....
    Seriously, he is a cartoon, this is why i would never read entertainment weekly, they are full of crap

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