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HDCP Master Key Revealed 747

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the wow-that's-a-big-one dept.
solafide writes "The HDCP Master Key has allegedly been revealed. If true, this information will allow anyone to create their own source or sink keys, essentially making HDCP useless for content protection permanently. No word yet on how it was obtained, but if true, this is a great day for content freedom around the world!"
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HDCP Master Key Revealed

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  • Hooray for freedom (Score:5, Insightful)

    by fnj (64210) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:02AM (#33572454)

    And hooray for common sense. You knew it was hopeless.

    • by bieber (998013) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:15AM (#33572614)
      I wouldn't say hooray for freedom. If this is a win for freedom, it's only in the sense of breaking out of jail for as long as it takes them to catch you and toss you back in. The answer isn't to keep cracking these "protection" schemes, it's to stop buying into them at all until the companies behind them realize that customers are tired of paying for hardware that actively works against their interests. There seems to be a really dominant mentality among people in the know about these things that it's alright to keep supporting this nonsense monetarily because we'll always find a way to break it. That's all fine and dandy for now, but what happens when they start to get really serious about "protecting their content," and start introducing devices that can't be so easily broken?
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by captainpanic (1173915)

        The more permanent freedom is a matter of time. At some point, lawmakers will be from the generation that also posts on forums, that downloaded mp3's when they were younger (or still do), and that watched 2 or 3 movies illegally when they were students.

        The current lawmakers and judges are of a different generation altogether. they paid the equivalent of a good night out (bar / club) for just 10 songs on a piece of plastic that wouldn't last for more than 10 years of you use it frequently.

        So, anything that p

        • by jamesh (87723) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:38AM (#33572924)

          he more permanent freedom is a matter of time. At some point, lawmakers will be from the generation that also posts on forums, that downloaded mp3's when they were younger (or still do), and that watched 2 or 3 movies illegally when they were students.

          I'm from that generation, more or less, and still think it's pretty rude to download stuff that you didn't pay for. I'm against supporting broken business models that don't let you store the media in the format that's most useful to you (eg on a media center) but that still doesn't mean that you get to download stuff illegally.

          The smart thing to do would be to concentrate less on prevention - people are always going to copy stuff no matter what - and focus more on detection. Find the people who are downloading your stuff and get them, rather than making stuff harder for the rest of us.

          And it doesn't matter what generation you are from. There will always be someone who's willing to take the media empires money to tow their agenda through the lawmaking process.

          • by icebraining (1313345) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @11:06AM (#33574238) Homepage

            The smart thing to do would be to concentrate less on prevention - people are always going to copy stuff no matter what - and focus more on detection. Find the people who are downloading your stuff and get them, rather than making stuff harder for the rest of us.

            And how do you propose to implement such "protection" without the constant privacy violations (ISP-wide deep packet inspection, loss of anonymity, etc) we've been hearing about?

            While I can perfectly understand that it's "rude to download stuff that you didn't pay for", I don't see any means of prevention/detection that don't violate more important rights.

        • by ArsenneLupin (766289) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:39AM (#33572930)

          At some point, lawmakers will be from the generation that also posts on forums, that downloaded mp3's when they were younger (or still do), and that watched 2 or 3 movies illegally when they were students.

          Current lawmakers all smoked dope when they were students. That doesn't mean that they are all in favor of legalizing marihuana.

          • by c0lo (1497653) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:55AM (#33573162)

            At some point, lawmakers will be from the generation that also posts on forums, that downloaded mp3's when they were younger (or still do), and that watched 2 or 3 movies illegally when they were students.

            Current lawmakers all smoked dope when they were students. That doesn't mean that they are all in favor of legalizing marihuana.

            And the "flower power" generation had, during 60-ies [wikipedia.org] - 70-ies [wikipedia.org], some pretty liberal idea [allmusicals.com] about sex ... FF 40 years (they should be in their 60 now) and... try singing that in public, you'll see it's almost as illegal as marijuana.

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            Not all of them, but enough of them that it is now legal medicinally in many states and California has legalization for recreational use on the ballot this November. This represents a massive shift in views in the electorate and made it acceptable for politicians to advance these bills.

            These things take time. 40 years of telling people that marijuana will make you jump out of a window after stabbing someone in your crazy drug-induced rage backfired when pretty much everyone has either been high or seen en

            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              by Mikkeles (698461)

              '... whereas legal marijuana doesn't directly effect any large legitimate financial group negatively.'

              Well, not legitimate, but organised crime is heavily dependent financially on drugs being illegal, so they would probably try and finance resistance to legalisation.
              Also, police like having drugs be illegal as it helps prop up their power structure.

              • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @10:58AM (#33574120)

                Also, police like having drugs be illegal as it helps prop up their power structure.

                I'm not sure how far you are talking about when you say power structure, but it goes much further than just the people employed by pig forces all over the place.

                Politicians get a very useful bogeyman with (some) drugs being illegal. The military have something to fight, keeping them busy (ever noticed how one of the biggest welfare systems in many countries is the military? There are places all over the western world where there are next to no jobs available, but the military. Threaten to take away the military, and these people will be as upset as perceived "dole scroungers". The biggest irony is that those who support the existence and use of monstrous militaries often are opposed to any forms of social security!).

                The legal system and industry is one of the biggest beneficiary of the prohibition of some drugs. Lawyers write laws against substances, lawyers prosecute those breaking the rules, lawyers defend those breaking the rules, lawyers judge if you have broken the rules or not. And good luck trying to understand the law if you aren't in their club. The legal industry is one of the biggest rackets in the world! You can't call yourself a lawyer or solicitor unless you have a law degree and belong to a bar society, and the gate keepers to both what is a good law degree and who gets into bar societies are all lawyers. I don't see any accountability to the people when it comes to lawyers, yet we have to deal with them if we want to be in anyway successful in this world. And we have to deal with them if we are destined to be unsuccessful (by the usual social-success yard sticks).

                Throw in other factors, like for-profit prisons, the legal drug industries (tobacco, drink, caffeinated products, medicine[1]), a press who's business is driven by shouting about the downfall of society, and the pressure to keep some drugs illegal becomes pretty big!

                [1] If people could legally grow a plant in their garden that could be used for many, maybe even a majority, of minor ailments the market for paracetamol/Tylenol would shrink massively.

              • by mikeabbott420 (744514) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @11:10AM (#33574316) Journal
                Americas vast prison system is also a huge industry with a vested interest in marijuana hysteria.
                I suspect the alcohol industry may see it as a threat as well. In my experience people who smoke weed abuse alcohol less and that could cause a loss of revenue. Thus the alcohol industry will feed hysteria because they know it is false.
          • Ya (Score:3, Insightful)

            by Sycraft-fu (314770)

            I think some forget how hypocritical people can be. This is even easier when you are talking old people being hypocritical with regards to what they did in youth. For one, we tend to remember the past through rose colored glasses. Not only does this mean we think things were better back then, but we kinda white wash our own histories. We forget some of the shit we did, the positions we held, and remember a more idealized version of ourselves. So "I smoked pot daily and loved it," may morph in to "I tried po

          • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

            Current lawmakers all smoked dope when they were students.

            Probably not. But many did.

            That doesn't mean that they are all in favor of legalizing marihuana.

            Probably not. But many are.
        • by The Grassy Knoll (112931) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:41AM (#33572974) Homepage

          At some point, lawmakers will be from the generation that []

          Is this why marijuana is now legal in most western countries, the lawmakers being from the generation that first started widely using it...?

          .

        • by IndustrialComplex (975015) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:52AM (#33573122)

          At some point, lawmakers will be from the generation that also posts on forums,

          Same generation, different culture.

          The Democrat looks at the Republican and wonders how he could believe that. The New Yorker takes a look at the rural farmer and wonders why he would subject himself to that sort of life. The rural citizen wonders how anyone could deal with so much noise. And DC elects Marion Barry. Again.

          But if you want the real reason: The people who care about a subject will get their way. Just because some people would vote for/against an issue doesn't mean that they actually care enough about that issue to do anything about it.

        • by flink (18449) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @10:02AM (#33573280)

          The more permanent freedom is a matter of time. At some point, lawmakers will be from the generation that also posts on forums, that downloaded mp3's when they were younger (or still do), and that watched 2 or 3 movies illegally when they were students.

          Right, because all those hippies from the baby boomer generation that are in power now have shutdown the military, ended the war on drugs, and prevented racial discrimination in all its forms. Or more likely, 99% of those who make it into power had to sell most of their ideals to the highest bidder or never had any in the first place.

          The law makers we have in 20 years will be the same assholes we have now with different faces. Real change comes when the people force the government to take action, not the other way around.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by srussia (884021)

          The more permanent freedom is a matter of time. At some point, lawmakers will be from the generation that also posts on forums, that downloaded mp3's when they were younger (or still do), and that watched 2 or 3 movies illegally when they were students.

          Let's run through that last phrase a couple more times: "watched 2 or 3 movies illegally... watched 2 or 3 movies illegally".

          It sounds strangely archaic (or dystopian) when said with a straight face like that.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        And when you stop buing them they start blaming piracy instead...

      • by supersloshy (1273442) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:42AM (#33572986)

        The answer isn't to keep cracking these "protection" schemes, it's to stop buying into them at all until the companies behind them realize that customers are tired of paying for hardware that actively works against their interests.

        I agree with your post except for this sentence. The problem with that argument is that most people, quite frankly and quite unfortunately, don't care whether or not something has "DRM or GPL or whatever crap you're trying to convince me to have or not have" (in the paraphrased words of everyone else). Most people don't care about region-lockout, SecuROM-style DRM, HDCP or any of that so long as it "works" for the time being. Most people, instead of caring whether or not their media will play on some out-there FOSS player, just buy whatever player can so they can watch it right then without caring or even thinking about whether or not that DRM will be around long enough for them to not have to re-buy all of their media. I'm almost as anti-DRM as you can get, and it's the depressing truth from what I've found.

        • by jedidiah (1196) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @10:00AM (#33573238) Homepage

          > or any of that so long as it "works" for the time being

          Well. That's the problem with all of this nonsense.

          IT DOESN'T and it's only getting worse.

          The n00bs won't care why something breaks. They will just get upset when it
          does and blame the most convenient target available. This may be the studios
          or the hardware vendor depending on the individual.

          However, they won't need to understand the situation to lay blame.

          Although Big Content might get lucky and get away with stuff like Microsoft did.

          No. DRM makes it much more likely that it won't "just work".

          The whole "need to patch BD player to play new movie" nonsense is one of the reasons I won't touch that technology yet.

          As geeky as I am, I just don't believe that a consumer appliance should be in constant need of patches.

      • by Kjella (173770) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:58AM (#33573204) Homepage

        People want content, the hardware is just a means to that end. As long as the copyright holder can exclusively decide what DRM will be applied you have no possibility to vote with your wallet short of doing completely without it. Also it's practically impossible to avoid DRM-capable hardware, 99% of all computers today have a DVD drive and thus pay a CSS license and thus support DRM. All graphics cards from Intel, AMD and nVidia support HDCP. Same with any modern TV or monitor.

        The only way people win is when DRM is broken, but they are committed to continue selling it. That is the only reason you can still buy DVDs, otherwise they would have moved to DVD 2.0 with new and better DRM long ago. I just hope the combined mass of cable boxes, TVs, recievers, graphics cards, monitors and so on now is big enough they will not be able to implement a new standard. That is how DRM dies, not trying to make them go for a DRM free platform. That we already know they won't.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Bert64 (520050)

        The problem is a lack of user education, the average end user doesn't understand how their freedoms are being restricted by such products...
        The only way to educate those users, is through the mass media, and unfortunately that mass media is controlled by the very people who are trying to enforce restrictions upon them.

        I would much rather media companies work on more competitive pricing and superior products, rather than actively spending their time and money to make their product inferior to the pirate copi

    • This is premature (Score:3, Interesting)

      by gr8_phk (621180)
      HDCP has not really become widespread enough for this to be a good thing - in fact it's a bad thing at this time. People don't complain about it yet and with it broken, the manufacturers will simply do something different - and possibly worse. So next time you break an encryption system, please keep quiet until it becomes a widespread problem for people ;-)
  • Odd (Score:3, Interesting)

    by DavidR1991 (1047748) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:02AM (#33572470) Homepage

    On twitter, the original link to the pastebin is from 'IntelGlobalPR'. Is that a fake account, hacked, or is this actually a publicity stunt from Intel for something?

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by bsDaemon (87307)

      Some one had made a similarly named account with regards to BP during the height of the oil spill issue and used it to basically be a dick about various things, or so I heard on NPR. I quit using twitter months ago. I would expect its a fake account name. That doesn't sound like the sort of name that the "official" Intel twitter account would use.

  • Man (Score:4, Funny)

    by The MAZZTer (911996) <megazzt@@@gmail...com> on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:03AM (#33572472) Homepage
    I can't wait for THIS number to be turned into a song!
  • by ihatewinXP (638000) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:06AM (#33572502)

    How will this actually become practical?

    From my understanding this breaks the HDMI cable protection, more than anything re-opening 'the analog hole' except with full digital goodness if someone hacks the firmware on a player they can then use the signal freely. Expect many more downloads from 'the usual sources' of HD content....

    Will be interesting to see how the industry reacts to this. As all these machines today have upgradeable firmwares and internet connection that wont be able to totally close this break in the hardware spec itself but may cause problems for those seeking to exploit this leak. As we know these companies are more than used to harassing customers for their own interests.

    I for one welcome the new freedoms that come with this. Too many devices out now based on the standard for the industry to change overnight - the cat is out of the proverbial bag.

    • by jeffmeden (135043) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:16AM (#33572638) Homepage Journal

      There are plenty of picture-perfect copies of digital media out there already, that's the bitterly ironic thing about DRM as it sits today; the people just trying to play by the rules are getting stuck buying more expensive, less compatible equipment while the pirates use software techniques to get whatever content they want, however they want it, with relative ease.

      If HDCP didn't exist, there would still be legal battles over what kind of hardware was legal to sell (like bluray copiers, "open" DVRs, etc). If it were to go away tomorrow, the possible upside would be more software tools available to do things like media backups, software DVR of "protected" content, and more choices when it comes to what kind of TV/monitor you can use with a media source like a bluray player or cable box. Again, ironically, I wouldn't expect genuine piracy to be helped at all by this, and by and large people buying gear off the shelf at Best Buy will never know what happened.

    • by Coopjust (872796) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:25AM (#33572748)
      From what I understand,the leak makes revocation useless:

      "The master key allows you to recover every other key in the system and lets you decrypt [HDCP video content], impersonate a device, or create new displays and start selling HDCP compatible devices."

      While [Intel and content providers] are spending millions on HDCP, he says, they will be denied the benefits of research that can help fix the technology. Ferguson predicts that a year from now, someone will post a HDCP master key on the Internet, and the money spent on the system will be wasted.

      Upgrading the firmware of players to disable HDMI altogether isn't possible at this point. I'm not sure of the exact process, but since you can make new displays, you can create a device that just makes up a random one if it doesn't handshake in five seconds. Also, you can impersonate any existing device- and blocking every existing monitor on the market isn't feasible either.

    • by Vertana (1094987) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:31AM (#33572812) Homepage

      If you hooked your HTPC to your non-HDCP compliant display, you could possibly modify your device driver to decode the HDCP encryption and be able to view content at full 1080p on your non-HDCP compliant display. Alternatively, someone might be able to implement it in hardware and provide a cheap device to lay in between your device and non-HDCP display to decode the stream on the fly. All of this... just so people can watch content at full HD on the monitor they legally paid for.

  • yup (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Pojut (1027544) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:08AM (#33572520) Homepage

    Further proof that DRM is, for all intents and purposes, completely useless other than pissing off "honest" consumers.

    • by Blue Stone (582566) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @10:05AM (#33573320) Homepage Journal

      It has other uses too: dissuading casual pirates from ever jumping ship and buying into the medium.

      A friend of mine couldn't play a couple of Blu Ray discs he'd bought because of various compatibilty issues to do with updated keys or whatever. It convinced me that Blu Ray just wasn't ready for the living room. Why would I want to give these fools my money when it results in a crapshoot? No Blu Ray player for me, no discs either. I decided to spend my money on something that's not so flaky.

  • Who revealed it (Score:3, Insightful)

    by iONiUM (530420) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:10AM (#33572544) Homepage Journal

    There's just one key, and they never expected this to happen? "But.. but, well, we just never expected someone to give it out. It was umpossible."

    What kind of security is that? Quite frankly I hope corporations continue to be stupid, so we can continue to break their stupidity with our key mastering abilities.

    • Re:Who revealed it (Score:5, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:20AM (#33572674)

      Nobody had to give it out. The encryption is weak, and it has been known for a long time that it would be possible to derive the master key given data from a sufficient number of devices. I'm surprised it took this long for someone to actually do it.

    • Inside sources say that the CEO had it written down on a post-it stuck to his monitor.
  • Content Freedom? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by wilsone8 (471353) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:11AM (#33572556)

    Why is I when I read "content freedom", I have a feeling you mean your ability to copy movies from torrent and avoid having to pay anyone for the huge investment and hard work they put into making movies. Sure, that's not what everyone will use it for, but it seems like most will. That's not something to cheer about in my book, but to each his own.

    • by Cyberax (705495) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:15AM (#33572620)

      How come movie industry hasn't died after the invention of VHS tapes?

      • by ledow (319597) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:48AM (#33573068) Homepage

        Because, as in all things, most people are honest.

        If I want a movie, I buy it. That might mean buying it second-hand, or buying it from a friend, but I don't do the shady deals in pubs with strangers. Most people are like me, and most people actually pay for stuff. VCR's and DVD-R's are, of course, used for piracy - because they are recording devices. But if you didn't have those, people have camcorders, or webcams, or any one of a million and one recording devices.

        The recording device, or the technology built into any recorded media, does not stop anything, at all, ever, except genuine, honest customers doing something quite reasonable. Anyone who wants an illegal copy can get one in any one of a million different ways. Hell, the early DVD rippers basically screenshotted the screen of a DVD player so many times a second and recorded the audio. It's not hard at all, because of the "analog hole". But the only people who bother to go to that amount of effort are established pirates and those who genuinely believe they are doing something quite reasonable and should be allowed to do it.

        Despite popular opinion, that's NOT the majority of people.

  • by Bruce Perens (3872) <bruce@perens.com> on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:20AM (#33572680) Homepage Journal

    I paid for my home with my share of Pixar's IPO. And I'm an Open Source evangelist. So, I'm in both worlds where this is concerned.

    What I think is fair is for infringing redistribution of copyrighted content to be prosecuted as necessary. You really don't have the right to give all of the internet a copy of that Hannah Montana song. But when I have paid or done whatever is appropriate to gain the right to view that media on my LG TV, I should have the right to view it on my Linux system too.

    So, basically I am for content creators having the right to monetize their work and against having an electronic cop in my TV room. And I'm against having Free Software locked out of being a player.

    I hope the key is real and that it's really this simple. I am not equipped to test it today but I'm sure someone here is.

    • by guruevi (827432) <evi.smokingcube@be> on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:35AM (#33572878) Homepage

      It gets worse actually, with HDCP you cannot use signal splitters or other devices like scalers or converters that are frequently used in professional projection and scientific setups. If you do, you will get snow (not immediately, just sometime down the road when somebody has loaded HDCP protected content) on the whole display (not just the content) making those things useless. If you use a splitter for example, you have to go out of your way and buy another device ($80) to sit on the primary channel to make sure it can't negotiate the HDCP encryption. But HD content will still play even if you don't have an HDCP-compatible setup (as there is no content I know off yet that forcefully locks people out of their Chinese/Wal-Mart TV/Blu-Ray el-cheapo knockoff setup), it's just that if you do have an HDCP-compatible setup (and you paid good money for eg. Dual-DVI KVM, splitter, displays and projectors with high-res 120Hz signals for scientific research), it will malfunction.

    • by Sycraft-fu (314770) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:57AM (#33573192)

      As you say, there are two separate issues, the issue of respecting copyright and the issue of doing what you want with your devices. Well HDCP does nothing to stop copyright infringement. The pirates just nab a copy earlier in the chain, just rip the disc. Sometimes they do it later in the chain, just record a movie in a theater. Either way the fact that they can't nab a signal from the wire doesn't matter at all, they don't even try.

      What this does do is prevent legit uses. I really want to build a HD DVR for my living room. I don't want the one the cable company sells. Not only do you pay a monthly charge, but I don't care for its features or its tiny drive. I want to build my own. The capture card I want is already on the market, the Blackmagic Intensity. Expensive, but worth it. ...

      Except HDCP stops all that from working.

      So I could go and just download the content online, any and every thing I could want is out there, free for the taking. I cannot legitimately just record it off my expensive ($80/month currently) cable TV connection.

      I'm very fed up with copy protection these days because this is what is happening. It isn't protecting anything, it is hurting normal users. It is so overbearing that it interferes with normal usage, and still it does nothing to stop infringement.

      Another thing, along those lines, is I can't play Blu-ray movies on my PC. I have a BD-RW drive, 1920x1200 monitor and HDMI soundcard out to a massive home theater system. Seems like the tech is there. However because of the way my system works, the display output is mirrored, one copy via DVI to the screen, the other via HDMI to the soundcard, since it need a video signal to get clock from to send its sound. All devices HDCP enabled, but Blu-ray disallows playback in the event of a mirrored screen.

      They've done a great job of protecting me from myself, but nothing to stop me from downloading a program and ripping and uploading their movies, if I so chose.

  • by goodmanj (234846) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:36AM (#33572888)

    In particular, read
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-bandwidth_Digital_Content_Protection [wikipedia.org]
    and
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blom's_scheme [wikipedia.org]

    Some key (heh) facts:
    * This key is not stored in high-def devices themselves, nor does any manufacturer possess it. This is the key used to *make* individual manufacturers' keys.
    * The generated manufacturers' keys are set up in a way that device A and B can communicate secretly without knowing each others' keys.
    * Because of the way this system works, if enough individual manufacturers' keys are known, one can figure out the master key. In this case, "enough" is 40.

    Important point: it's not like some random tech at Sony got fired and decided to blow the whole thing wide open. If it's a leak, it's a leak from just one or two specific keyholders at Intel, who developed the system. But it doesn't have to be: any random person with 40 different Blu-Ray players and a whole lot of cleverness could potentially figure this out.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by radtea (464814)

      This is the key used to *make* individual manufacturers' keys.

      I haven't paid much attention to the whole HDCP mess as I've seen that movie before, but this simple fact is the most astonishing thing in the whole account.

      There are only two possible outcomes to a set-up that depends on a single master key like this:

      1) the key gets out. For a technology that is supposed to be around for decades this is as near to inevitable as can be, even if it couldn't be reverse-engineered. Even if 99.99% of the attempts to find or leak it fail, only one has to succeed and the key is

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by goodmanj (234846)

        1) is clearly a problem, but I don't think you have to worry about 2) losing the master key.

        From a mathematical standpoint, if I understand the linear algebra right, the key-generating authority could ask each manufacturer to send back a copy of their individual key: it would be easy to construct a new master key matrix which is compatible with all the manufacturers' keys. It might not be exactly the same as the original, but it wouldn't matter.

        From a practical standpoint, bureaucracies are pretty good at

  • by tekrat (242117) on Tuesday September 14, 2010 @09:44AM (#33572998) Homepage Journal

    I predict Sony will announce Blu-Ray2 tomorrow, and now you have to dump all your existing HD equipment and buy their newfangled crap with a different master key. All your existing investment in HD crap must be tossed in the trash.

    Think of the boom to the economy if every American has to buy their movies ALL OVER AGAIN, for the 4th time, as well as replace their player, TV and the expensive cable between them.

    Oh yeah, firmware update to PS3's that prevent playing Blu-Ray. Sony changes tagline for PS3 commercials to "It only does nothing".

    Either that, or here comes Toshiba with HD-dvd-2... Div-X anyone?

    This could signal the end of physical media. My prediction is that media companies will start selling only executable packages that contain player-code, the movie itself, and rootkit, and the player program will erase the movie after it's been watched, leaving the rootkit installed, so they can monitor if the player program is altered by the user, or the movie is watched again.

    And then Orrin Hatch will allow Sony to blow up your computer if you tamper with their movie.

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