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Downloads of DoS Attack Tool LOIC Spike 267

Posted by timothy
from the should-come-on-by-default dept.
wiredmikey writes "As Anonymous initiated what it said will be the 'largest attack ever on government and music industry sites' in response to actions taken by the Justice Department against operators of file sharing site Megaupload.com, downloads of a popular DoS attack tool have spiked. While the Denial of Service tool known as the 'Low Orbit Ion Cannon' (LOIC) was developed by the 'good guys' to stress test websites, it has been a favorite tool of Anonymous to take its targets offline via denial of service attacks. Interactions seen on Twitter and IRC, made it clear that the action against MegaUpload has sparked many more individuals to get involved in the online protests and download the LOIC to take part in the attacks and has resulted in a massive spike in downloads according Slashdot sister site Sourceforge."
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Downloads of DoS Attack Tool LOIC Spike

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  • by Osgeld (1900440) on Friday January 20, 2012 @09:44PM (#38771162)

    have 2 new search terms to punch into google after the word download!

  • Umm... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday January 20, 2012 @09:47PM (#38771178)

    You're probably going to get caught if you don't know what you're doing.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      The whole point of LOIC and similar tools (including nmap, when used this way) is, that you never do is alone but always with so many others, that it becomes impossible to track them all down.
      Like a fish swarm of a million fish. The shark doesn't catch them, because it becomes impossible to focus on one. They're everywhere!

      If you do it alone, you're, of course, an idiot. Since even with the use of the famous seven proxies, it couldn't even get a single server down. Alone, the only way is to use a botnet. (E

    • Re:Umm... (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Hentes (2461350) on Saturday January 21, 2012 @07:01AM (#38773218)

      If you DoS from your own machine, you don't know what you are doing.

  • by wbr1 (2538558) on Friday January 20, 2012 @09:50PM (#38771198)
    Those now downloading LOIC are not Anonymous.

    Seriously.. their IP has been logged!
    • by wisnoskij (1206448) on Friday January 20, 2012 @10:02PM (#38771264) Homepage

      I wonder if it is all people from outside of the USA? and I wonder if America would have any luck extraditing thousands of people for a single crime.
      I don't imagine that anyone non anonymously doing this in America really has a chance to get off easily. Something like this they are likely going to classify as terrorism.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Lunoria (1496339)
      But, downloading LOIC is not a crime (Yet). Therefore why would Sourceforge hand over the IP requests if asked?
    • So what i they log half of the US? Concentration camps?

      • by AHuxley (892839)
        No, they might just watch your search logs for a few weeks and then sort you into a weapons, drugs, crime or porn raid.
        Camps get messy - too many smart people mixing, talking, making new friends, demanding lawyers, medical care, a few escapes with images, deaths, guards having fun...
        You will see camps when less than 1% of the population is protesting - a big number for the USA.
        Until then its very personal raids with courts or black sites.
        • by EdIII (1114411)

          No, they might just watch your search logs for a few weeks and then sort you into a weapons, drugs, crime or porn raid.

          Gee.. I wonder what the average choice will be?

    • by Anonymous Coward

      wget has got to be the Tourist tool of the century of all the Brobots in 4Chon.net's R9K1.

      Taking pictures and leaving footprints (Chuck Norris style).

      Nothing to see here, move along.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      So?

      Let's say, for arguments sake, 100,000 people download it in the US and use it against the websites currently being hit by Anon. in response to the MegaUpload takedown. Are the authorities really gonna charge 100,000 people with DDoS or whatever the equivalent crime on the books is, most likely kids mind you, and drag them into court? I would LOVE to see that happen, and the resulting reaction from the Internet community, and Anonymous. Please, law enforcement agencies, and DOJ. PLEASE, do that!

      They know

    • by symbolset (646467) * on Saturday January 21, 2012 @02:03AM (#38772268) Journal
      LOIC has a javascript implementation where you can load a seemingly innocent page and then go to bed. Your browser will then hammer the affected sites 100,000 times an hour - and it's not your fault - because you can't be expected to know that a simple page can do that.
    • by SeaFox (739806)

      Yeah. Instead, one person outside the U.S. should download it. Then, he should upload it to some webserver that has mega amounts of bandwidth so he can share it with all of them in a way the authorities can't track easily.

  • by DanTheManMS (1039636) on Friday January 20, 2012 @09:52PM (#38771210)
    After Operation Payback (the widespread use of LOIC against Bank of America, PayPal, and other entities that refused to process payments to Wikileaks), the FBI got involved. Raids were made. A freshman student at my own college was raided and had all his electronics taken away, and that was just for passively being an operator in an IRC channel that coordinated the attacks, not even running the tool himself.

    As an above poster said, LOIC is not anonymous. I hope these script kiddies aren't so foolish as to make the same mistakes twice.
    • by subreality (157447) on Friday January 20, 2012 @10:43PM (#38771476)

      I hope these script kiddies aren't so foolish as to make the same mistakes twice.

      Fuck that. I hope they do. DOS attacks are the lamest, most degenerate hacktivism ever. It doesn't change anyone's minds, it doesn't help create a better system, and it just causes damage in the process. The only thing it accomplishes is sating some primal desire for revenge, so I hope they get filtered out of the pool so the rest of us can go back to creating instead of defending.

      You want to try to make things better but you're feeling disenfranchised? Subvert the system. Work on decentralized DNS replacements. Work on anonymity networks. Work on improving Bitcoin to make it a serious contender. Generate content and release it for free.

      Don't destroy. Create.

      • by MMORG (311325)

        My kingdom for a mod point. Great post!

      • by Anonymous Coward on Friday January 20, 2012 @11:18PM (#38771658)

        I do agree with you, DOS attacks are pointless; however, what options are left? You make a bunch of statements but truthfully, all of them have been tried.

        I just had to switch ISPs since my current one decided that SSL connections would be limited to 7kb/s (Yes, just slightly higher than modem speeds) and I work from home and have to use a VPN. There reasoning is simply that file sharers are using SSL and they can't deep packet inspect them so there solution is to rate limit all SSL connections to a barely acceptable speed.

        As for subverting the system, or building something new to solve a problem that shouldn't exist, how many times must we do this? How many protocols for file sharing have been created already? They just keep adding laws or abusing laws or trying to force others to do their work for them (ISP, website owners, etc).

        Look at megaupload (I'm not a fan and have never used any file service like this) but the simple fact is that that company is no different than any other company (e.g., Google). The fact is that it is (or was) illegal to hold one person legally responsible for the actions of others, but that is exactly what the "law" is doing by arresting the owners of megaupload. At this point of time we no longer have Law (for the people), and without Law their is nothing left. The simple fact is this "token" assault is a peaceful demonstration (aka Internet equivalent of marching in the streets) that should be taken seriously; but as you, and others make clear, it will do nothing and/or provide fodder for even more laws. So at which point does the message have to go from peaceful to non-peaceful? This is what I am scared of as I believe there is little or no chance of a peaceful settlement anymore :( So I will encourage as much of this peaceful demonstration as much as possible for the small glimmer of hope that the message will get across before the worse case occurs....

        Back a person (including you) into a corner and sooner or later you realize you have no choice but to attack. High unemployment, unbalanced laws, misappropriation of laws/legal/justice, economic enslavement, loss of hope, loss of freedom, loss of the "american dream", and ignoring the will of the masses are all, in my opinion, signs that the perverbial shit is about to hit the fan....

        But keep thinking it's just about some kids that want to have some fun....

        • by rtfa-troll (1340807) on Saturday January 21, 2012 @05:40AM (#38772992)

          The fact is that it is (or was) illegal to hold one person legally responsible for the actions of others

          I'm going to have to call bullshit on this. If you pay a hitman to kill someone, you also go down for a crime; sometimes murder; sometimes conspiracy. If you go along on a crime in the US (e.g. a housebreaking) where someone gets killed, even if you weren't directly involved, then they charge you with murder. If you are a mafia boss and they prove you ordered a drugs transport, they do you as a drugs dealer.

          In this particular case, the police seem to have made very sure that they have evidence of inducement; there are tape recordings of the megaupload people discussing that they want to encourage copyright infringement. There is evidence of the people at megaupload using database searches for copyright material etc. etc. Now, I don't take what the police say at 100% face value, but you should be very aware that it's likely that they have deliberately made sure that they have proof of every stage needed to make you look very foolish. They have laid a trap and claiming that these people are innocent becuase they can't prove inducement to unlicensed copying is falling into that trap.

          The members of Megaupload are innocent for another reason. The majority of the copyrights broken belong to members of the MPAA or RIAA. These groups have been deliberately attempting to reduce the public domain. As such, they are acting contrary to the constitutional aim of copyright and their copyrights should be invalid. Given that they have had several chances to act against it and have failed in their constitutional duty, the members of the supreme court should be impeached for allowing this kind of situation to continue. Unfortunately judicial immunity makes that a bit difficult.

          Don't confuse "you can't prove it" which is a simple factual matter with "this should be allowed" which is a moral matter. Also don't confuse that with "this is legal" which is often decided in practice by judges who don't understand the issue in the first place. By mixing these things up you give arguments to your enemies.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Don't destroy. Create.

        Don't destroy. Create.

        You need to be sending that message to the people sitting in government and industry, and NOT to a bunch of freedom loving, disenfranchised geeks.

        Unfortunately when you are dealing with a bully the only way to stop them is to fight back. The day of protest only delayed the inevitable. And all those things that you are talking about; bitcoin and proxies, can just as easily be destroyed by the copyright lobby as all those things proposed by SOPA and PIPA.

        Government and industry are so far being much more aggr

  • by TiggertheMad (556308) on Friday January 20, 2012 @10:02PM (#38771268) Homepage Journal
    I recently had an insight about Anon's activities. The reason hactivisim is gaining strength as a movement is because people are disenfranchised with society and seen conventional avenues of affecting change as a waste of time. The 'man' has a tight grip on the media, politicians and the police are being increasingly militarized for use on peaceful protesters.

    People are unhappy with the status quo. Unless change starts happening now and fast, I predict Anon's numbers and targets to grow substantially in the coming years.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday January 20, 2012 @10:26PM (#38771406)

      The reason hactivisim is gaining strength as a movement is because people are disenfranchised with society and seen conventional avenues of affecting change as a waste of time.

      Well, hear, hear. Obviously conventional avenues of effecting change are a waste of time; they have proven not to work. A bunch of nerds, techies, and assorted sending e-mails and letters to a representative? You get a standard text back. Bla-di-bla protect interests of creators bla-di-bla thousands of jobs.

      Now with Wikipedia and Google blacking out and providing the masses with uncensored information about SOPA and the obvious reaction, that it something that worked. That is why Dodd (MPAA) wants to meet in camera with the tech industry giants to see if they together can't work something out. The public again off the game board. And what are they going to do? Vote Democratic? You get what you have now: ACTA, SOPA/PIPA, etc. Vote Republican? Who knows what you would have gotten. Left or right, you lose.

      The only thing Dodd is scared about is a mainstream medium that is not part of the Entertainment Industry. A side-channel. What if that medium tasks itself to educating the public regarding copyrights and how ridiculous it is that a recording made in 1935 won't enter the Public Domain until 2067. What if it starts calling people to action? That is way more effective that DDOSing a few irrelevant sites.

      • a recording made in 1935 won't enter the Public Domain until 2067

        I'd say that's extremely optimistic considering that US life expectancy is now 76 years. I guess it was lower in 1935 though.

        • by dgatwood (11270)

          Living for 62 years after making a recording isn't really all that optimistic. It's probably less than one standard deviation above the norm even if someone made the recording in his/her mid-twenties.

      • by guttentag (313541) on Saturday January 21, 2012 @12:17AM (#38771882) Journal

        What if that medium tasks itself to educating the public regarding copyrights and how ridiculous it is that a recording made in 1935 won't enter the Public Domain until 2067.

        My favorite example of the ridiculousness of copyright abuse by the content industry is still Happy Birthday To You [wikipedia.org]. The tune was first published in 1858... three years before Abraham Lincoln took office! Martin Van Buren, the country's 8th president, was still alive! Mark Twain wouldn't publish Tom Sawyer for another two decades! Yet this song was published in a few different forms over the next 80 years or so, and now the copyright on it does not expire until 2030... 172 years after it was first published. Think this is just some obscure case that no one takes seriously? Warner Music Group bought the rights to it in 1998, and as recently as 2008 they reported earning $5000 a day in royalties. Ever wonder why restaurant employees will embarrass you on your birthday but won't really sing Happy Birthday? Because it would be a public performance of a copyrighted work and they would be liable!

      • by andydread (758754)

        Obviously conventional avenues of effecting change are a waste of time;

        That depends on what the obvious conventional avenues are. From what I see current conventional avenues for affecting change is purchasing legislation from corrupt congress and senate. So if you really want to effect change you do what the MPAA/RIAA/BSA and other lobby groups do. You pay for legislation. Now whether the multitudes want to band together to lobby congress on the digital rights of the people rather than big media is another story altogether. I try to give to The EFF when I can but that

    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday January 20, 2012 @10:53PM (#38771532)

      Taking a stand for MegaUpload? This is a perfect example of when anonymous gives itself a bad name.
      Kim DotCom is a greedy ruthlessly conniving pig of a man that makes wall street executives look noble in comparison. His success is based on the exploitation and stealing of others. [wsj.com]

      This isnt fighting oppression, this is being a crybaby because you cant download your latest call of duty game in a few clicks

      • by bky1701 (979071) on Saturday January 21, 2012 @02:39AM (#38772416) Homepage
        He was targeted because he offended the copyright industry. He is accused of doing something he did not, and should not be illegal anyway. That is why there was retaliation. If you valued freedom, you'd be calling for more. Instead, you cower and claim they "look bad" for standing up. You are despicable.
        • by geniice (1336589)

          No he's logical. When you are campaigning you pick and chose your cases. Rosa Parks was selected as the person to campaign over because she had a pretty respectable background. You want to demonise drugs? Ignore the deaths on sink estates and focus on any deaths of pretty middle class girls (Leah Betts).

          For copyright you want to stick to cases involving respectable parents doing things that are borderline fair use in any case.

          Leave Kim DotCom to the lawyers. He can afford them.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      The reason hactivisim is gaining strength as a movement is because people are disenfranchised with society and seen conventional avenues of affecting change as a waste of time.

      and this is somehow novel to this generation. I was 16 once and an anarchist then i grew up got a job and learned how society and the world really works.

      Real change comes from within. Vote, run for politics, discuss politics with your peers and elders. Somehow everyone decided discussing politics was a dirty evil topic and society went to hell as everyone started caring more about what the Kardashians are doing than whats going on with the world around them.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by MMORG (311325)

      Well, let's see. We just got done with a well-constructed, well-reasoned, well-executed protest against SOPA and PIPA, and we killed those bills dead as a *direct result*. When was the last time a DDoS did *anything* other than harden the resolve of the party being attacked? How do they think the MPAA et al will react? "Oh my goodness, some script kiddies are DDoSing our web site. Quick, release the MegaUpload people from jail and turn their servers back on! It's our only hope!"

      • by dissy (172727) on Saturday January 21, 2012 @05:09AM (#38772870)

        We just got done with a well-constructed, well-reasoned, well-executed protest against SOPA and PIPA, and we killed those bills dead as a *direct result*.

        That simply has not happened.

        The sponsor of SOPA has recently also pushed new anti-childpornography [loc.gov] laws through the house and congress, in preparation for attaching SOPA as a rider.

        He has already admitted the ONLY problem with the last SOPA was that he let the public know about it [theverge.com], giving them time to express their dislike, and has stated he learned from that mistake.

        As in, the damaging effects, the destruction it will cause, and the fact people are against it, he doesn't see any of that as a problem. Only that the public had time to counter it.

        This time next year, SOPA *WILL* be law.

        * Note I am not arguing in favor of DDoS either. You are quite right in that such attacks have not helped anything one bit, and are not part of any functioning solution.

    • by flyingsquid (813711) on Friday January 20, 2012 @11:14PM (#38771646)

      I recently had an insight about Anon's activities. The reason hactivisim is gaining strength as a movement is because people are disenfranchised with society and seen conventional avenues of affecting change as a waste of time. The 'man' has a tight grip on the media, politicians and the police are being increasingly militarized for use on peaceful protesters. People are unhappy with the status quo. Unless change starts happening now and fast, I predict Anon's numbers and targets to grow substantially in the coming years.

      And these people are protesting what, exactly? That they might have to pay $8 in a theater to see the latest, oppressively stupid instalment of the "Transformers" franchise instead of getting to download it for free? Yeah, these guys are real crusaders for social justice.

      There's a right way and a wrong way to do online activism. Google and Wikipedia showed the right way to do it with their protests of SOPA. Their protests made a powerful statement about online freedom without attacking anyone, and it was amazing to see how quickly Congress retreated. By comparison, the Anonymous attacks just seem like a vindictive act of petty vandalism, by a bunch of kids who are angry because their parents have taken their toys away from them. It's not helping anything, if anything it's destructive. People are going to think "if this is what they mean by freedom of speech, then maybe I'm in favor of a little censorship".

      • And these people are protesting what, exactly? That they might have to pay $8 in a theater to see the latest, oppressively stupid instalment of the "Transformers" franchise instead of getting to download it for free? Yeah, these guys are real crusaders for social justice.

        Just because their method of displaying their discord isn't particularly proactive, doesn't mean that they don't have a legitimate complaint. While specific individuals might have varying motives, I get the impression that Anon's objecti
  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday January 20, 2012 @10:59PM (#38771560)

    ... easily dispersed should you strike the shepherd.

    Politicians, DoJ, even the RIAA and MPAA, these are mere sheep. Willing scapegoats, but immortal. You cannot destroy them. You must strike at the human minds behind.

    Take away the anonymity of the directors of the copyright owning corporations behind this. Expose their secrets. Illuminate their crimes. Dissolve their privacy, pull back the veil behind which they destroy human rights. Ruin their lives. Then tell them why. Tell the world why. Let them be a lesson.

    Do not be fooled into thinking your government is against you. Once educated, they will be your greatest ally. But they have been deceived. Strike at the heart of the corruption, not a symptom of it.

    • by Okian Warrior (537106) on Saturday January 21, 2012 @01:23AM (#38772156) Homepage Journal

      Yes, let's go back to working within the system because that has worked so well in the recent past.

      Have you been paying the slightest bit of attention?

      Do you honestly believe that educating the government will work when the entire SOPA blackout didn't?

      All attempts at working within the system have failed. It's time to try other avenues.

      Anonymous has chosen to promote change in their own way. It may work, it may not... but at least it has the *possibility* of working. We now know for certain that all the "right" ways will fail.

      Perhaps someone should come up with a system similar to kickstarter, where people can donate money to fund the opponent of congressmen they don't like.

      Lamar Smith introduced SOPA and is coming up for reelection this year (I think). Perhaps people should pledge money to a fund which will be given to his opponent, as a response.

      Perhaps someone should start a super-PAC org and take donations to air ads against him.

      There are lots of other things we could do - we just need some creativity.

  • by joocemann (1273720) on Friday January 20, 2012 @11:08PM (#38771618)

    I've got an idea, but I don't develop/code software.... someone please run with this....

    Make a plugin for browsers that denies or blocks access to sites for companies that are actively pushing to destroy net neutrality. Like most blacklists, they are maintained by a source that tries to keep up to date, and upon whom the subscribers bestow trust (that the sites are indeed pushing against net neutrality).

    A few ideas...

    1) Block site, and reference evidence as to why.
    2) Offer option to continue to the site (lets say you've got to pay your ATT bill online or something, but you like the filter for most other reasons but were forced to choose ATT for an ISP thanks to oligopoly).
    3) Link to donations for EFF or other pro-net-neutrality activism groups?

    Anyway.. I feel like something like this, if produced well, and promoted, would catch the eye of even the layman who may be interested, and want to be supportive, but may not actively follow the unfolding drama around the topic... The outcry against SOPA/PIPA clearly grabbed the attention of many who are politically inept or disinterested, and they motivated well. It would be nice to see a plugin like this spread with public support.

    • Honestly, I have a hard time imagining someone who doesn't know about net neutrality issues, but would still choose to install a plugin that actively detracts from their usage of the internet in order to support net neutrality. Seems that anyone who might be interested enough to download the plugin would probably be interested enough to do their own research.
    • Many people feel net neutrality is a government solution to a problem created by government generated barriers to entry in the first place. I haven't researched it myself so I don't know how much of a role the government plays in creating ISP monopolies, but I wouldn't assume more regulation is the answer.

  • by O('_')O_Bush (1162487) on Saturday January 21, 2012 @12:02AM (#38771832)
    LOIC can't bring down the gov't. The gov't doesn't see illegal attacks as civil disobedience. There is nothing that will push the gov't to crack down on these people like scaring them with a little anarchy.

    If you want to protest, do so legally and publicly. The Guy Fawkes mask protests were a great gimmick to get media attention and raise awareness. Chances are, elected officials will be more likely to act in your favor if they see their jobs and sweet money flow coming to an end.
  • by Bob9113 (14996) on Saturday January 21, 2012 @08:38AM (#38773472) Homepage

    The timing of the MegaUpload takedown seems extraordinarily coincidental. There has been talk of it being retaliation for killing SOPA, but that doesn't wash, because the DoJ does not rush into things like that (for good reason). They have said it was in the works for a long time, and the indictment indicates that.

    So look at it the other way. Why did they wait until immediately after SOPA died?

    Once you ask that question, I think it is hard to ignore the elephant in the room. They were holding off because they knew it would make SOPA look unnecessary. They were trying to get SOPA passed before they executed on existing law.

    Even assuming you think MU is guilty of the more apparently illegal stuff in the indictment (like I do), that doesn't seem right. "We're not going to execute the law, because we think we might be able to jam these mutts up harder when the new law goes through, and we don't want the public to know that existing laws already cover this." I dig how, in this case, waiting for SOPA to indict the MU leaders could be handled without triggering ex-post-facto, but it still seems like a dishonorable way to execute the law.

    Punk kids run LOIC because they think the system does not respect them, and therefore they have a duty to disrespect the system. However misguided those punks may be, behavior like the above displays the very disdain for the public that is causing them to feel disenfranchised.

    This is a chain reaction that is not going to stop unless one side decides to act in a mature fashion. Here is an inconvenient truth: It is not going to be the punk kids that decide to be the bigger man.

The bogosity meter just pegged.

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