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Microsoft Music Entertainment

Microsoft Kills Off Zune Music Service (networkworld.com) 66

alphadogg writes: It's one of those "You mean it was still alive?" moments: Microsoft today officially has killed off its Zune music streaming and download service. The company notified users in September that Zune services would be retired on Nov. 15. Microsoft has been phasing out its Zune brand for some time now, with Zune music service being morphed into Xbox music and then Groove music. Devices were discontinued in 2011.
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Microsoft Kills Off Zune Music Service

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  • by grilled-cheese ( 889107 ) on Sunday November 15, 2015 @04:20PM (#50936097)
    "And we listen to al our music on the most wonderful device created; the Zune. Zune! Zune! Zune! [whenwillapple.com]" - The Simpsons S24E02 [simpsonswiki.com]
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday November 15, 2015 @04:32PM (#50936159)

    How can you trust these online services? One of the biggest IT related companies was behind this service, yet they pull the plug. This is not some service that you only use as long as you need it for your project. It is a service that replaces the old school 'buy a record, and keep forever' type of consumption goods. What when you want to throw a party with a couple of good friends within a decade or two and say "do you remember this song?" followed by a silence when you want to start that old song because the service no longer exists?

    For now iTunes seems to work. Steam seems to work. The cloud for files is only used as an online backup (in my case), so I'm safe there too. Steam is in fact a service that let many games evolve to newer and better platforms. Some old games didn't work anymore on newer operating systems, but I've found out that some of them now even work on Linux and Mac. But it is just a matter of time before they pull the plug.

    I still don't trust iTunes, although I only buy music through iTunes. It is just way too easy: What's this song, click buy, and you 'own' the song. I always sync the iTunes library to my main Linux desktop and hope I can safe my music collection this way, so I can throw a party when I'm 55, and do the shuffle on that old school drum'n bass tune I still have on iTunes in 2030 (and probably end up in hospital, in my mind I'm still 21 years old, but my body doesn't seem to follow my mind).

    • by phantomfive ( 622387 ) on Sunday November 15, 2015 @04:36PM (#50936197) Journal

      How can you trust these online services? One of the biggest IT related companies was behind this service, yet they pull the plug.

      You can't. Microsoft has already done this sort of thing before with "Plays For Sure." Storing your data on other people's servers ("The Cloud") is a way to lose it when you don't have some kind of backup.

      Buying music on iTunes (or other places without DRM) is fine, though.....if iTunes goes away, you can still play it.

      • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday November 15, 2015 @05:16PM (#50936419)

        I don't think this is any different than iTunes. This is mostly name and official support, my "Zune Pass" (I was grandfathered into the old 15$ version which gave me 10 credits for songs every month) has worked all along on the new Windows 8 Music apps and through the Xbox Music / Groove Music transitions. The email I got at the end of September just said my "Zune Pass" was now "Xbox Music Pass" and had dropped in price. I still have access to all the files I've bought in the past.

        My guess is that the DRM thing just means if you had Pass subscription files on a Zune, you're not going to be able to update the content licenses anymore: meaning, you won't be able to use Zune devices with anything but MP3s without content protection. It's basically the same as if you had Pass content and didn't sync for a month except now you can't update those licenses when you sync and thus will only be able to get that content through the new apps. I'd have to dig out my Zune to confirm but I'm pretty sure that it's only saying those particular devices won't be able to sync that type of content any more.

    • by PPH ( 736903 )

      "do you remember this song?"

      We can remember it for you wholesale.

  • by mTor ( 18585 ) on Sunday November 15, 2015 @05:00PM (#50936333)

    If you've been a honest customer and actually purchased music from the Zune Marketplace store, it most definitely has DRM. And after the service is shut down, your music collection will be rendered useless and you won't be able to play it again.

    From TFA:

    Note Content that was purchased with DRM may not play if the license canâ(TM)t be renewed.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday November 15, 2015 @05:13PM (#50936399)

      When Sony shut down their service, they recommended everyone burn the purchased songs to cds and rip them to have a drm-free copy as further use would be prevented in the case of a renewed license issue. I found this so interesting that I actually saved a copy of the web page. Within a few days Sony updated the information about the music service getting shut down and quietly removed the information about making cds and ripping them.

      Just showed me that their are real people that actually care working at these places and then the lawyers come into play.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      If you've been a honest customer and actually purchased music from the Zune Marketplace store, it most definitely has DRM. And after the service is shut down, your music collection will be rendered useless and you won't be able to play it again.

      From TFA:

      Note Content that was purchased with DRM may not play if the license canâ(TM)t be renewed.

      That is simply not true. The article must mean content that was rented. I have several MP3s that I purchased with the MP3 credits as a subscriber. They are ordinary MP3s. I just pulled one up from years ago and played it in VLC to verify. There was 0 network delay. VLC has no proprietary DRM plug-in. It's just an MP3.

    • by hawk ( 1151 )

      On the bright side, few Zune users will be affected:

      This little zune user went to market,
      and this little zune user stayed home.
      This little zune user ate roast beef,
      and . . . .

      awe, nuts. It's five *piggies*; there weren't that many zune users . .

      hawk

  • Said nobody, ever.
  • Zune died a long time ago. What Microsoft killed off was the walking dead.

    .
    I wonder how that dude with the Zune tattoo on his arm feels nowadays....

  • by Anonymous Coward

    The Zune software still works. Wish Microsoft would have made the windows 8 and 10 music player more like the Zune.
    I carry the Zune HD with me all the time. I always find it funny when people ask me what is that. I let them see it and the next words out of there mouth is this is so much nicer then the iPod I had/have.
    It was a same Microsoft can't seem to run a good advertisement for the Zune.
    I don't like using my phones battery to play music so I carry a Zune and my Note 4.

  • The Zune service was for the rental service, where you paid a monthly fee and could play that music for the month on your Zune PMP. You used Zune so you didn't HAVE to buy music. It was the only thing in its niche at the time.

    And, I am compelled to add: The brown Zune was actually lovely in person. If you hated it, you never held it.
  • PlaysForSuren't?

  • After selling only two Zunes since product launch it is way too early to tell if this is a flop or not. Microsoft needs to have more stamina and reevaluate products after they sold the first ten, so they should be in a much better position to make call in 2028.

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