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Why Amanda Palmer Left the Music 'Industry' For Crowdfunding (digitaltrends.com) 105

Amanda Palmer says abandoning the commercial music industry for a subscription model made it possible to take more chances, like a new album with psychedelia artist Edward Ka-Spel. An anonymous reader quotes Digital Trends: I spent my whole life in this music industry trying to figure out how to sell what I'm making. But I don't "sell" anymore -- I just have this magical net of supporters who are supporting me whether I choose to make a record with Edward or make a record with my dad, which I did last year... [S]ometimes, you absolutely want to do ridiculous, noncommercial stuff. The Patreon patrons have been a godsend in that sense. I've had to continually re-educate myself that this isn't about selling music. It's about making music. I got so used to those two being inseparable that it took a lot of psychological work to divorce the processes.
She says her supporters "haven't just promised; they've put down their credit card." And Neil Gaiman, her husband, also strongly endorses the freedom to experiment. "If, as an artist, you ever listen to your fans' demands, and their demands are always insisting you make the last thing they liked again, you would go nowhere."
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Why Amanda Palmer Left the Music 'Industry' For Crowdfunding

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday May 14, 2017 @12:26AM (#54412735)

    Not having financial worries kinda helps with the whole escaping the music industry thing.

    • by TWX ( 665546 ) on Sunday May 14, 2017 @01:04AM (#54412799)

      Regardless of who her husband is, she achieved a degree of commercial success prior to this change, which means that she has managed to build enough audience to make transitioning to crowdfunding easier. Obviously being a signed act isn't the only way to build that audience, but it certainly has its advantages.

      • by Shoten ( 260439 )

        Regardless of who her husband is, she achieved a degree of commercial success prior to this change, which means that she has managed to build enough audience to make transitioning to crowdfunding easier. Obviously being a signed act isn't the only way to build that audience, but it certainly has its advantages.

        I'm not sure how much success constitutes a "degree" to you, but I've never heard of her any my tastes in music range pretty far and wide. And as for ease of transitioning to crowdfunding...if she's terrible and can't keep a record deal, then trading on the coattails of her husband in a crowdfunding model (instead of having to demonstrate her own talents to a record company) would be a lot easier, indeed.

        • by PopeRatzo ( 965947 ) on Sunday May 14, 2017 @09:33AM (#54413687) Journal

          but I've never heard of her

          You can't possibly believe that there are no successful artists that you haven't heard of.

          • There are thousands of artists I never have heard of.
            Amanda Palma, I only know the name, for one particular reason: a female student in my Aikido Dojo has a crush on her. And she told me about her because I was talking about 'American Gods', a book of Neil.
            Actually I don't know how she looks like (neither do I know about Neil, nor can I remember his surname (Stevenson?) ), I don't know what kind of music she makes ... nor do I care.
            But I likely continue to by Neils books ... and perhaps I stumble over music

            • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

              by Anonymous Coward

              Thanks once again for reaffirming that your lack of knowledge on a given topic will not stop you from commenting. Keep up the good work!

            • by bmo ( 77928 )

              > I don't know what kind of music she makes ... nor do I care.

              I'm going to inform you anyway.

              If you want a Top40 reference, she is the lead singer of the Dresden Dolls.

              >don't know who Dresden Dolls are

              Unless you listen to only jazz and classical, I can't believe you got through the Oughts without hearing them.

              Coin Operated Boy:

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com]

              But then maybe you prefer something older:

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com]

              --
              BMO

              • by Gr8Apes ( 679165 )

                Considering my tastes, I can honestly tell you I had no clue who this was. I want to say I've heard of the Dresden Dolls, but I'd be lying. Goo Goo Dolls, certainly, After clicking your oh so helpful link, I can say I understand why, I'd rather be rickrolled.

                The only reason I even looked into this topic was because I was curious why someone I'd never even heard an inkling of was generating a front-page story. I guess we know who David likes.

              • Actually I don't listen to music anymore since years.
                Unless a band plays in my favourite pub ...
                Jazz is one of my preferred forms, yes.

                My CDs I gave to my father and my iTunes music I probably should delete, did not listen to any song since ages.

                Dresden Dolls, I heard about when I googled her name yesterday. She indeed has a strange idea about eye brows :D

                First song is funny, second one can not be played in Germany ... one of the reasons why I no longer bother with "music from the industry".

    • She had a successful music career in the Dresden Dolls before they were married.
  • Marillion was first (Score:5, Informative)

    by TheLongshot ( 919014 ) on Sunday May 14, 2017 @12:49AM (#54412769)
    Funny that they keep going back to Amanda Palmer for these stories, when the real pioneers in crowd-funded music is Marillion, who started doing it way back in 1996 for tours, and 2001 for albums. If you have a big enough fan base, you can probably can do something like this.
    • Marillion still existed in 1996? I thought they did four albums and disappeared in the 1980s.

    • Nothing funny about it. She just released an album, so the music press wants to interview her about it. Marillion's last album is long past the interview cycle, so the press isn't chasing them for interviews.

    • Well, it makes sense, considering she literally has been pushing for this kind of funding for the arts, and even has a Ted talk [ted.com] and book [amazon.com] about it.
  • I wonder how Hollywood and the music industry have been taken over by lawyers in the first place.

    • Just like cpl. Hicks has a nice solution for all systemd, Oracle, Microsoft and Apple problems, in this case let's listen to The Bard.

  • This is more like news for nouveau arty farty obscure musicians. Just because the words "crowd funding" is included, doesn't mean it has any technical or science connotation.
    • It's only news for nerds because her husband is a famous science fiction author, which again, puts everything else in a different context.
  • by 93 Escort Wagon ( 326346 ) on Sunday May 14, 2017 @03:10AM (#54412937)

    Your cousin Laura tried walking her own path, and ended up wrapped in plastic.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    The one who wanted people to work for nothing?

    http://kotaku.com/5943112/amanda-palmer-asks-musicians-to-play-for-free-pisses-off-musicians

  • by mrclevesque ( 1413593 ) on Sunday May 14, 2017 @08:47AM (#54413557)

    Fixed

  • "If, as an artist, you ever listen to your fans' demands, and their demands are always insisting you make the last thing they liked again, you would go nowhere."

    Hey, it worked for Status Quo.

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