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Television Businesses Technology

Millennials Unearth an Amazing Hack to Get Free TV: the Antenna (wsj.com) 564

From a report on WSJ: Dan Sisco has discovered a technology that allows him to access half a dozen major TV channels, completely free. "I was just kind of surprised that this is technology that exists (alternative source)," says Mr. Sisco, 28 years old. "It's been awesome. It doesn't log out and it doesn't skip." Let's hear a round of applause for TV antennas, often called "rabbit ears," a technology invented roughly seven decades ago, long before there was even a cord to be cut, which had been consigned to the technology trash can along with cassette tapes and VCRs. The antenna is mounting a quiet comeback, propelled by a generation that never knew life before cable television, and who primarily watch Netflix , Hulu and HBO via the internet. Antenna sales in the U.S. are projected to rise 7 percent in 2017 to nearly 8 million units, according to the Consumer Technology Association, a trade group. Mr. Sisco, an M.B.A. student in Provo, Utah, made his discovery after inviting friends over to watch the Super Bowl in 2014. The online stream he found to watch the game didn't have regular commercials -- disappointing half of his guests who were only interested in the ads. "An antenna was not even on my radar," he says. He went online and discovered he could buy one for $20 and watch major networks like ABC, NBC, Fox and CBS free.
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Millennials Unearth an Amazing Hack to Get Free TV: the Antenna

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  • by thinkwaitfast ( 4150389 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @11:45AM (#54926427)
    green marker, it greatly improves the picture quality.
  • Paywalled (Score:4, Insightful)

    by nicholasjay ( 921044 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @11:46AM (#54926431)

    Article is Paywalled. Alternate Source?

    I grew up using an antenna for all of my TV needs. Now I have a TiVo Roamio OTA with a lifetime subscription (which I got a for a couple hundred dollars) for all of my DVR and app (Netflix, Hulu, etc) needs.

    • I grew up using an antenna for all of my TV needs. Now I have a TiVo Roamio OTA with a lifetime subscription (which I got a for a couple hundred dollars) for all of my DVR and app (Netflix, Hulu, etc) needs.

      Same here, although I found the Tivo interface with Amazon Prime, Netflix somewhat clunky and sloooooww.

      I only use the Tivo OTA Roamio to DVR my over the air stations, and I also have Tivo Minis that connect to it for each room with a TV.

      I use an Amazon FireTV for my streaming....much better for Netf

    • by cashman73 ( 855518 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @12:11PM (#54926687) Journal
      Next up, Millennials will "discover" an amazing hack to reading the news -- buying a printed newspaper from a newspaper stand! More at 11!
      • Next up, Millennials will "discover" an amazing hack to reading the news -- buying a printed newspaper from a newspaper stand! More at 11!

        "There's no batteries to run out!", they exclaimed.

        • by clovis ( 4684 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @01:47PM (#54927673)

          Next up, Millennials will "discover" an amazing hack to reading the news -- buying a printed newspaper from a newspaper stand! More at 11!

          "There's no batteries to run out!", they exclaimed.

          Oh, no no no, not printed newspapers.

          Those things can catch fire.
          Just try it. Spread one out on the floor or sofa and just light one corner of the thing. See what happens. You'll want to be able to put it out, so be sure to have a full bladder before you begin.

          When I was a kid, all we had to play with was fire. And we were glad to have it.

      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Okay, found news stand, bought newspaper, I've been tapping and swiping it for half an hour now and it still shows the same page. Halp!

      • by bestweasel ( 773758 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @12:33PM (#54926905)

        I tried one of those. Fairly low resolution but huge screen size for a portable; manual zoom and the other controls are basic but work well, though not when it's windy for some reason. Easy to read in bright sunlight but sadly there's no backlight. Water resistance is poor though I saw someone using one as a makeshift hat in a downpour! Annotations can be made with an ink or graphite stylus. Cut and Paste works but is messy and Copy is quite slow. I've had mine for several weeks and as far as I can tell, it never needs recharging. I can't get the updates to work though.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    What the fuck.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @11:49AM (#54926469)

      For real.

      "We interviewed some dumbshit kid and he said some dumbshit things! Millenails are turning society on it's head!"

      • by hey! ( 33014 )

        Boomer here. You sound like a Gen X'er who's having a little difficulty with the generational succession thing; let me help you out.

        On the plus side, your're older and wiser now. Congratulations. That's something you should feel proud of.

        On the minus side you are no longer cool. You are the opposite of cool. It happens almost overnight. Yesterday you and your cohort were on top of the world, the center of attention, the apple of the media's eye; but when you woke up to day you didn't realize it, but yo

        • by JohnFen ( 1641097 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @05:21PM (#54929353)

          You are the opposite of cool. It happens almost overnight.

          Indeed. I remember the day it happened to me!

          I am amused by all this millennial hate. The generational wars have always been with us and will always be with us, and they're always stupid.

          As a wise (older and deeply uncool) man once told me: every generation thinks:

          1) That they invented sex
          2) That the generation before them are corrupt idiots
          3) That the generation after them are lazy idiots
          4) That their generation is the last reasonable one before the collapse of civilization

          All of those things are just as true now as they were a thousand years ago. Which is to say, not even a little bit true. But it amuses me to see the tradition carrying on.

    • But it's about those wacky millenials!

  • by scourfish ( 573542 ) <scourfish@yah o o . com> on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @11:46AM (#54926437)
    And they said that MBA's were useless. Sure showed them.
  • by clonehappy ( 655530 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @11:46AM (#54926439)

    Or are people really stupid enough to not know about broadcast fucking TV?

    an M.B.A student

    Oh, nevermind.

    • by SeattleLawGuy ( 4561077 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @11:52AM (#54926509)

      Or are people really stupid enough to not know about broadcast [expletive] TV?

      It's quite easy to not know about a technology from before your time. It's not like kids are born knowing how to wash clothes on a washboard either. Some of them don't even know how to wash clothes with modern technology by the time they go to college. I've known brilliant people who didn't know how to use a mop because nobody had ever taught them.

      • Re:Is this sarcasm? (Score:5, Interesting)

        by clonehappy ( 655530 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @11:57AM (#54926559)

        I get it, but this guy isn't that much younger than me. Maybe if it was a 15 year old kid or something...I know what a telegraph is even though I've never even seen a telegram let alone used the equipment!

      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        It's quite easy to not know about a technology from before your time.

        In this day and age, with information literally at one's fingertips, there is no excuse for not being informed on a multitude of subjects. If you don't know something, you look it up.

        There are many things I didn't know how to do, but guess what, I learned on my own, either by asking someone who was doing the thing I wanted to know, or read a book (pre internet) or now, DuckDuckGo it.

        Perhaps if people such as the one in the a
      • by JeffOwl ( 2858633 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @12:25PM (#54926811)
        This isn't "before" anybody's time. Broadcast TV has been available continuously for the guy's entire life.
      • A few years ago, an acquaintance was between jobs, controlling his budget, and had dropped his cable subscription. He knew about broadcast TV, but the thought of getting an exterior antenna (more money), mounting it on a roof, wiring it, aiming, etc. was daunting. I told him that where I lived, a plain old FM dipole antenna was sufficient to pull in all of the major local channels, since FM radio is close to TV channel 6. I could get sufficient signal for testing a new TV, say, just by pinning the dipole

        • Or you can get a prepackaged flat antenna for around $15 that you can stick on the wall with a command strip...

      • by Solandri ( 704621 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @01:52PM (#54927721)
        When I was moving to my new house, my millennial cousin came with me to the moving van rental store. It was a hot day, so on the drive home he complained that the van didn't have air conditioning. I told him to open the window. He fiddled around with his door for a minute, then declared "The windows in this van don't open." I had to explain how to roll down the window with the hand crank. He'd never been in a car without power windows.
    • Re:Is this sarcasm? (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Anubis IV ( 1279820 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @12:17PM (#54926729)

      Or are people really stupid enough to not know about broadcast fucking TV?

      Sadly, this is a real phenomenon, and it isn't limited to Millennials.

      My folks had a couple in their mid-40s over for dinner a few years back (2014ish, I think). At some point during the conversation it came up that my parents used an antenna to watch TV, rather than subscribing to cable. The wife insisted that TV channels aren't available for free, so no matter what my parents called it, what they were really doing was stealing TV from the cable companies. It took my parents and her husband a good 20 minutes to convince her that it was not, in fact, a form of theft and that OTA TV is, in fact, freely available to anyone willing to put up an antenna.

      Mind you, this woman was old enough that she wouldn't have grown up with cable TV in her home, since it wasn't widely available during her childhood. The fact that she didn't remember that or know that it was still a thing was astounding.

      So yes, these sorts of people really exist, and it's not just MBAs.

  • by PhrostyMcByte ( 589271 ) <phrosty@gmail.com> on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @11:47AM (#54926449) Homepage

    Get a HDHomeRun [silicondust.com] and you can watch broadcast TV from pretty much any modern device. Each one has two tuners, and they can be split across devices. Want to record? Connect a cheap NAS. Want more than two channels at once? Just get another one -- they work in tandem.

    Been using these for about a decade now and couldn't be happier. The quality is even better than basic cable because you don't need to deal with their re-encoding antics.

    • by cayenne8 ( 626475 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @11:59AM (#54926569) Homepage Journal

      Get a HDHomeRun [silicondust.com] and you can watch broadcast TV from pretty much any modern device. Each one has two tuners, and they can be split across devices. Want to record? Connect a cheap NAS. Want more than two channels at once? Just get another one -- they work in tandem.

      I actually look into this, and found that the cost to buy a computer and put something like MythTV on it or whatever, to get DVR capability along with the HDHomerun (I used to use these awhile back)....was GREATER and more of a hassle than to just buy a Tivo OTA DVR/tuner unit...

      The Tivo comes with 4 tuners, 1TB DVR storage and lifetime "service"...for about $399.

      I set up one of these with Tivo mini units throughout the house for every TV I have...for my over the air needs. I used Amazon FireTV for streaming Playstation VUE, Netflx, etc....

      But do look into the Tivo OTA unit....it was plug and play, 4 tuners and less $$ than the DIY route with HDHomeRun.

      • by PhotoJim ( 813785 ) <jimNO@SPAMphotojim.ca> on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @12:03PM (#54926617) Homepage

        The advantage of the HDHomeRun solution, at least with Plex (if not with its own software) is that you get unencrypted feeds recorded on your hard disk. You can do what you want with them - you can generate DVDs or Blu-Ray discs from them, stream them, put them on a flash drive and share them... it's not trapped inside your box.

        • by cayenne8 ( 626475 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @12:08PM (#54926663) Homepage Journal

          The advantage of the HDHomeRun solution, at least with Plex (if not with its own software) is that you get unencrypted feeds recorded on your hard disk. You can do what you want with them - you can generate DVDs or Blu-Ray discs from them, stream them, put them on a flash drive and share them... it's not trapped inside your box.

          Very valid point!!

          I did like having that capability back when I was running HDHomerun with MythTV back in the day.

          I found, however, that I rarely if ever had any need or want to capture for keeping anything I got off of OTA TV.

          I'm gonna have to look more into PLEX. I'm not terribly familiar with it, other than my friend has a server set up that I hook into occasionally, but thought it was only for pre-recorded content.

          I was actually looking to maybe put my CD/Music collection that I have ripped into FLAC onto a PLEX server (they run on linux, right?) and use that to stream to my living room good stereo...from FireTV box over HDMI to the Marantz AV receiver, out....I'm thinking that would be a pretty darned good signal for my set up.

          Anyway..rambling....but I'll have to look into Plex more.

    • by TypoNAM ( 695420 )

      I've been using a HDHomeRun dual-tuner since 2007 with mythtv on my home linux server, a schedules direct subscription (since 2010) for guide information, and basically just using VLC and MPC-HC for playback via "Direct Download" URLs from mythweb interface. The setup has worked out very well for me.

    • by darkain ( 749283 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @12:20PM (#54926759) Homepage

      I picked up one of these tuners about a year ago, but without the added option of recording. Nobody in my house cares enough about TV to record, so it wasn't an issue. Most of our content is either PBS or available on Amazon Prime or some other streaming service. We mainly wanted it for live broadcasts (such as local sports or news)

      With a rooftop mounded antenna, surprisingly, my house is currently picking up 56 stations. The absolute minimum cost for cable in my neighborhood right now is $20/mo, which is exactly the same channels as the broadcast list, except we get a few extra international and religious stations, and are missing some government stations.

      The HDHomeRun was around $80, plus another $20 or so for the antenna, and another $20ish for wiring. That is the same as about 6 months of wired service from the cheapest local option for nearly identical content. This was simply a no-brainer!

  • Yes, if you want to sit through 18 minutes of advertisements (average) per 60 minutes of programming, sure, use broadcast television. If you work out the amount of television / streaming content the average person consumes versus the cost of fully-paid streaming, then your "savings" put the value of your time at far less than that of a fourth-world sweatshop worker. But whatever floats your boat.

    • It's 2017. Who watches anything in real time?

      I skip the ads, and I usually speed up the playback to 1.5X, so a "60 minute" program usually takes well under 30 minutes to watch.

    • You do know that those breaks are good times to go to the bathroom, wash the dishes, make the bed, start a load of laundry, etc.

      Also that a PVR works with it.

    • by slack_justyb ( 862874 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @12:10PM (#54926675)

      There's nothing wrong with streaming per se. I love Netflix, big Stranger Things fan, but the argument that I'm "saving" something by skipping ads I feel is quite silly to me. It was time that I originally planned to be non-productive. I planned on that time to yield nothing. So getting back the 18 minutes that I would have spent in ads still yields me $0 since that's the value I placed on that time originally. I just don't get this notion that every second of someone's life has some dollar and cents attached to it. We're not 100% productive beings, in fact that's very much the core reason we've invented things to increase our productivity.

      If putting a price on every second someone is alive is your kind of thing, then more power to you. I'm not calling you wrong in any sense of the word because I just feel that this isn't one of those things that has a "correct" answer. It's just a matter of how one values their time. I'm sure there's pros and cons to either perspective, but I vote with my dollars based on how much I enjoy the content, not the lack or presence of ads.

    • by darkain ( 749283 )

      "Commercials" are called "Designated Piss Breaks" - learn to use your time more effectively!

    • I 100% agree on time savings, but many of us don't use the antenna for watching the commercial-laden network TV shows (I pay for Hulu Plus for the no commercial versions for the 2 or 3 network shows I actually watch).

      The antenna is just great for picking up network stations for local news broadcasts, the local PBS stations for the kids and occasional documentary (Frontline, etc.), and the occasional surfing across the nostalgia channels (MeTV, Heroes, JusticeTV, etc.) And for that rare, can't miss broadca
  • The only problem with OTA HDTV in Silicon Valley is that all the clear channels are in foreign languages. English channels are whitewashed in static.
  • In the UK, "digital terrestrial broadcasting" still requires the use of an antenna, which is usually mounted somewhere on the roof. Although it's called "Freeview", you still have to pay an annual TV license (and almost all non-BBC channels have adverts). You get a selection of HD channels and even more SD channels, but if it's even more free channels you're after, something like a sat dish is probably the way to go in the UK.

  • Enjoy the ads, which take up half your viewing time and assume you are an idiot. I would not say I am "grateful" for our online marketing overlords, per se, but at least there's a slim chance that streaming ads are relevant.
    • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

      Enjoy the ads, which take up half your viewing time and assume you are an idiot. I would not say I am "grateful" for our online marketing overlords, per se, but at least there's a slim chance that streaming ads are relevant.

      They make OTA DVRs, you know, so you can record your programming and watch it afterwards, skipping through the ads.

  • by Waffle Iron ( 339739 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @11:52AM (#54926507)

    I count 36 OTA channels in my current lineup. That's about as many as I got on my first cable service in the 1980s. Admittedly, most of the channels are crap, but so are most of the channels on cable.

    My favorite way to set it up is to get one of those huge outdoor antennas and just throw it on top of the fiberglass in the attic, generally pointed at the transmitters. I've always gotten flawless reception that way (much better than rabbit ears), without having an ugly lightning magnet on the outside of the house.

  • I feel like this is an onion story that WSJ picked up accidentally.
  • The Wall Street Journal article still managed to screw it up. Antennas known as rabbit ears were for receiving UHF channels. The antennas that pick up network broadcasts were never called that.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by RadioD00d ( 714469 )
      Umm, no. Early televisions had dual telescoping antennas in a dipole configuration, for reception of VHF signals (channels 2-13). What you're thinking of is the 'bowtie' configuration that was used for UHF - that came later. The early dipoles were called 'rabbit ears' because you adjusted them at various angles to improve reception. Now, get off my lawn!
    • Close. Rabbit ears were for VHF, and that round / bow tie antenna was for UHF
    • by msauve ( 701917 )
      No, rabbit ears are VHF dipoles, made with 2 telescopic elements. Turn them to point them, adjust the length for the frequency.

      The corresponding UHF antenna is a "bow ties" (and often just a loop).

      Network broadcast stations were on both VHF and UHF.
  • In another 5 years (Score:5, Insightful)

    by drewsup ( 990717 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @11:59AM (#54926575)

    they will discover "radio" and forsake the AUX in jack they all live by...

  • by kqc7011 ( 525426 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @12:00PM (#54926581)
    I would switch to a over the air antenna, but I live where the nearest broadcast tower is over 60 miles away and line of sight to that tower is blocked by hills. A neighbor down the block had a antenna hooked up to a TV in his garage, three channels (one major network, one PBS and one off brand) were watchable and it worked fairly well most of the time. He ran cable and a receiver into the garage and took down the antenna. Now he can watch what he wants. The downsides of living away from a major metropolitan area still have not counteracted the upsides of not living in one.
  • You might be shocked about someone discovering OTA programming in the year 2017.

    I'm more shocked over the fact that he didn't know about a free product, which is a clear violation of the Millennial Manifesto.

  • I strongly recommend the bow-tie type of antenna. Works very well and doesn't break the bank (I think it's about $35 on amazon).

    If you get a smallish one, be sure to be aware of where your local broadcast towers are and point it towards those.

  • by dysmal ( 3361085 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @12:08PM (#54926657)

    My girlfriend is 42 and was raised with cable TV and she never knew about using an antenna until she met me. The commercials suck but that's what the mute button is for.

    The only down side I've found is that if you have spotty reception, it's choppy (kind of like buffering). Whereas pre-DTV spotty reception was static but tolerable.

  • Too bad the FCC just held an auction for a lot of the spectrum that these TV stations use. In many markets, half of the stations you can get over the air with "bunny ears" will go dark or cable-only within the next year. The spectrum is being sold off to the cell phone companies.

  • Yes, yes they are. When I first saw this ad I had to rewatch it several times because I couldn't believe what I was seeing. "Thanks to a federal government mandate, broadcasters must broadcast their shows... for free!" (I have a DVR - which doesn't always play nicely with antennae if you need to adjust them to get a signal! Which is why I naven't completely cut the cord from cable myself yet!) https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com]
  • Well at least millennials will get to experience the joys of constantly re-positioning an antenna to get a decent signal. The difference is they can tweet about it to the word instead of complaining about it to the people in the room.
  • by jandrese ( 485 ) <kensama@vt.edu> on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @12:20PM (#54926753) Homepage Journal
    OTA TV has gone through something of a resurgence after the switchover to digital. There are way more channels on the air today then there were 10 years ago. This happened at the same time cable started raising their prices unsustainably [huffingtonpost.com] so people are coming back and finding all sorts of channels that they would actually watch. Combine this with inexpensive online streaming options and Cable's $70+ monthly price point is a bad joke.

    In my area we have all of the big networks (ABC, NBC, CBS, Fox, CW, 7 PBS channels), plus Cozi, MeTV, Charge, Comet, TBI, Bounce, Justice, GetTV, Grit, Escape, MyTV, Movies, HgI, Retro, ion, ThisTV, and a ton of foreign channels. The only things I'm missing even a little are FX and AMC.
  • My favorite part of this story is that they're doing it so they can see the commercials. Cable company execs are probably losing their minds over this.

  • Anyone who is 'disappointed' not to see commercials on TV needs to re-evaluate her/his life. Or is this a new 'millenial' hipster trend?
  • by shoor ( 33382 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @01:05PM (#54927277)

    All of my TV watching is OTA broadcast. I used to record analog with TV capture cards. I also used them to 'digitize' my old VHS tape recordings so I could get rid of the VHS tapes. (Digitizing preserved the recordings, and also allowed quicker access since I didn't have to fast forward to watch something recorded on the tail end of a 6 or 8 hour tape.)

    When the USA switched to digital by mandate, I had to adjust. It took some doing and maybe I can offer some useful tips. A lot of stuff is European which uses a different system than the USA which uses ATSC. So, if you're European, or if you're searching the 'net and come across some European software like say kaffeine, beware.

    MythTV gets a lot of attention. I never got it to work and it seems like overkill to me anyway. What I use is me-tv. That's an unfortunate name because if you google me-tv you get a lot of false hits.

    Me-tv doesn't work well with ubuntu (something about gui libraries.) It also doesn't work very well with pclinuxos. But it works very well with Mint and Devuan! It's not really good for watching 'live'. But, you can start it recording and then watch the recording while it's being recorded with vlc or mplayer or something like that, and, depending on when you start watching or how far you've skipped ahead, you may be only seconds behind the live broadcast. Also with those players you can pause, go back, whatever, while it's continuing to record the program.

    When you've installed me-tv and first start it up, you do a scan and it finds the local TV stations. Then edit the channels list it created. Also be sure to edit the preferences as the default settings can be pretty wrongheaded, like starting a recording 5 minutes in advance and continuing after you've specified it should stop. You can put it in your 'startup applications' with the invocation /usr/bin/me-tv -s -m. This way it will start up automatically in the background and quietly record programs you have specified. But, if you're using a USB stick that has custom firmware this might not work because the OS has to find and configure the USB before it starts me-tv. My pcHDTV hardware has no problem because it's hardware support is build into the kernel, but with my Hauppauge TV stick, I have to worry about timing.

    Some stations will broadcast several programs at once and you can record several at a time if they use the same base carrier signal. If the station is broadcasting in full HDTV you get a nice high res picture. If they multiplex several shows, which happens a lot for local community and religious stations, you'll get a lower res picture. But there's a lot out there. If you like some of the PBS programs like 'Nova', it's nice to get the high resolution videos of nature. (Just so you won't think I'm too much of a culture vulture, I also watch 'Supernatural', and see it in all its 1280 by 1024 glory.)

    If you use a hauppauge tv tuner stick you have to copy a small file to /lib/firmware to get it to work. For my particular hauppauge the file name is xc3028-v27.fw, but it probably varies dpending on whihc model you have. Besides hauppauge, I've used pcHDTV which works 'out of the box' on newer systems.

    I hope this saves some of you some of the pain I went through getting all of this to work.

  • Not worth the $20 (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Shotgun ( 30919 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @01:09PM (#54927333)

    In the Raleigh-Durham area of North Carolina, there is very little to see OTA, unless you want to watch reruns of 60's sit-coms (Green Acres, The Beverly Hillbillies, etc) or westerns, so interspersed with adds for senior citizens (literally: "I've fallen and I can't get up", walk in bath tubs, scooter chairs, etc.)

    I've watched a bit for nostalgia (that's what was on daytime TV when I was a kid), and the cheesiness was unsettling, but it is not something that I would call "entertainment".

  • by rickb928 ( 945187 ) on Wednesday August 02, 2017 @03:01PM (#54928335) Homepage Journal

    ...because Centurylink had a 36+ hour total outage in my area, starting Saturday night.

    To this day no explanation, no apology, no rebate or refund for service not delivered. When my 'contract', triggered by signing up for automatic pay, expires, they will see me gone. I would rather have DirecTV than Prism ever again.

    Ever. I just won't pay extra to leave.

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